View Poll Results: What is the greatest piano quintet?

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  • Hummel, Quintet in E-flat for Piano, Violin, Viola, Cello and Double Bass, Opus 87

    3 2.27%
  • Schubert, "Trout" Quintet in A for Piano, Violin, Viola, Cello and Double Bass, D.667

    30 22.73%
  • Schumann, Quintet in E-flat for Piano & String Quartet, Opus 44

    21 15.91%
  • Brahms, Quintet in F minor for Piano & String Quartet, Opus 34

    30 22.73%
  • Dvorak, Quintet in A for Piano & String Quartet, Opus 87

    15 11.36%
  • Franck, Quintet in F minor for Piano & String Quartet

    3 2.27%
  • Shostakovich, Quintet in G minor for Piano & String Quartet, Opus 57

    12 9.09%
  • Other (please specify in comments)

    18 13.64%
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Thread: What is the greatest piano quintet?

  1. #16
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    I likes early Webern's piano quintet. One of good points to start with his music before diving into later stuff. One movement-work, about eleven minutes long in performance. Highly recommended by board chief crocodiles from the forest.

    I already mentioned Zarebski's Piano Quintet in other threads, it kicks all those famous quintets mentioned in this poll asses, it eats them for breakfast and isn't even fed at all.
    Head_case and Chrythes like this.

  2. #17
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    If you like the Piano Quintet form, here are some 19th century "Romantic" works worth looking into. Quintets by Herzogenberg, Raff, Eduard Franck, and Ludwig Thuille. All of them have many fine moments.

  3. #18
    Senior Member joen_cph's Avatar
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    Most listened to over the years have probably been the Schubert, Brahms, Schumann, Franck and Shostakovich quintets. Brahms in particular is a mood piece - is one in the mood for it or not, since the ongoings can be a bit heavy. Haven´t heard the Schmitt yet, even though I own it. Was initially startled by Gubaidulina´s some time ago, but now I find it much less interesting. The Faures have also caught my attention less than his piano quartets, but perhaps more appreciation will come. Recently esteemed ones are especially Rochberg´s (but perhaps it can be critisized as being too effectful), also Kokkonen´s, Martucci´s and Wuorinen´s.
    But will vote for "other", meaning probably Schnittke, Rochberg, or at least a more contemporary one.
    Last edited by joen_cph; Sep-08-2010 at 22:02.
    Kevin Pearson likes this.

  4. #19
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    The Piano Quintets of Faure take a while to find their beauties. If you like the Piano Trio, look into the Piano trios of Martucci, The first of the two is a very enjoyable work, as is of course his Piano Quintet.

  5. #20
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    Didn´t know that Martucci´s trios were even in existence, thanks. Do you happen to know J.B. Foersters trios ? Nice, if not very substantial works - the music of Foerster is awaiting more recordings and there might be a "hidden" piano quintet there as well, likewise by Ostrcil or Moyzes ... Not to speak of Sorabjis two quintets, would be interesting to hear them, at least no.1 has been performed in 2003 ...
    Some rather rare Danish piano quintets have also been recorded, by Heise, Hamerik and Koppel especially, but to me they don´t seem to be that important, though.
    A bit strange that Bartok´s early piano quintet is so rarely recorded ...
    Head_case likes this.

  6. #21
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    I too find the Shostakovich, Piano Quintet, a energetic, vital work. Had the opportunity to hear it last month at the Marlboro Music Festival in Vermont, USA (www.marlboromusic.org), with a group of young, extremely talented musicians. Pallavi Mahidhara,pianist (a student of Ignat Solzhenitsyn, at the Curtis Institute in Philadelphia); Liana Gourdjia, violin (Russian); Arnold Steinhardt, violin (1st violin of the Guarneri Quartet); Luke Fleming, viola; and Andrew Janss, cello. Also heard it rehearsed several times. That's the fun, listening to the rehearsals, before it is played in concert.
    Last edited by Nevohteeb; Sep-13-2010 at 22:22. Reason: misspelled words

  7. #22
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    I know the name (J.B. Foerster) but not the music. I think that there was once a CD of the trios available in America, but I don`t know if it still is. I think that I will see if there is a "download" since I would like to hear the music. As to the other Composers, these are new names to me,

  8. #23
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    Farrenc A minor

  9. #24
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    Default Bloch

    Try out Bloch piano quintet No 1. Great recording by Piers Lane and the Goldner quartet on Hyperion. I think it is a neglected masterpiece.
    clavichorder likes this.

  10. #25
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    Wouldn't it be much more interesting to hear arguments for our choice in stead of opinions? I voted without hesitation for Dvorak op.81 because it is the best piano quintet ever written from a viewpoint of instrumentation and balance between the instruments. Yes, it is rich in melodies indeed, but you can hear them all and everywhere. There is no powerplay required, all five parts are lively, full of inspiration and in permanent dialogue which the others and the audience. Unlike Brahms, who struggled with this, and many other quintets which from time to time have the character of a dialogue/struggle between piano and string quartet. Yes: Martin, Elgar as well as Shos have this transparency too form time to time, but are lacking the variation and richness of inspiration which shows Dvorak.

  11. #26
    Senior Member Arsakes's Avatar
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    Finally my favorite poll

    I hardly can choose between Schubert, Schumann, Brahms and Dvorak. I would add Sibelius Quintet too...

    At the end of the day, Dvorak's 2nd Piano Quintet is superior.

  12. #27
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    Voted for Brahms... but I love Franck's F minor as well.
    Il y a de grandes flaques de sang sur le monde/ Où s'en va-t-il tout ce sang répandu (Chanson dans le sang - Jacques Prévert)

  13. #28
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    The Foerster's works are very charming - trios are good, although I tend to stick to the string quartets (Thanks to the wonderful Stamitz Quartet for reviving these!).

    The Julius Zarebski and Fauré quintets are probably my favourite. The Taneyev one used to be ... but it's the Zarebski one. There seems to be a re-awakening to his works (finally!). So many new recordings:

    The brilliant Lason family:



    The well-reviewed Royal String Quartet (but not my faves):



    The interesting Szymanowski String Quartet:




    of the reissues - the most famous version (I got the Olympia original yay!!!)"



    and the brilliant but hard to find Pavane Records release by the amazing Varsovia Quartet.

    (note the piano is just a filler for these superb string quartet led piano quintets

    This thread covered Zarebski too

    Juliusz Zarębski
    Last edited by Head_case; Oct-20-2012 at 23:35.

  14. #29
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    The Shostakovich has to come in first. It won the Stalin prize, along with 100,000 rubles. This is the most ever paid for a chamber work!
    Last edited by KenOC; Oct-20-2012 at 23:42.

  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by KenOC View Post
    The Shostakovich has to come in first. It won the Stalin prize, along with 100,000 rubles. This is the most ever paid for a chamber work!
    That's only because Zarebski was Polish and ineligible for entry!

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