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Thread: Musical term

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    Default Musical term

    what would be the best musical term to use in a piece of music that means dying away slowly. I found the term Mancando online but i don't think that's a common term. Is there a web site anyone knows where i can look up terms that are common and recognizable.

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    Is morendo what you're looking for?

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    I'd agree with 'morendo'.

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    Senior Member Argus's Avatar
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    Why not just write exactly what you want in English or whatever language you are most comfortable with? Using Italian terms for the sake of it is a mark of unnecessary tradition keeping and possibly uncreativeness.

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    morendo! dfkjkdfdkjf

    less than 10 character limit is annoying

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    Senior Member Aksel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Argus View Post
    Why not just write exactly what you want in English or whatever language you are most comfortable with? Using Italian terms for the sake of it is a mark of unnecessary tradition keeping and possibly uncreativeness.
    I agree. Percy Grainger only wrote his markings in English. Some of them are rather hilarious. Like "Very slightly faster?".

    But I do like Italian.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aksel View Post
    I agree. Percy Grainger only wrote his markings in English. Some of them are rather hilarious. Like "Very slightly faster?".

    But I do like Italian.
    It makes me wonder if all these Italian musical terms and expression/tempo markings look as odd to them as the Grainger ones do to us.

    By the way, anyone else succumbed and bought the bargain-priced 19-CD Chandos anniversary Grainger set?

    Wonderful!

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    Senior Member Aksel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Delicious Manager View Post
    It makes me wonder if all these Italian musical terms and expression/tempo markings look as odd to them as the Grainger ones do to us.

    By the way, anyone else succumbed and bought the bargain-priced 19-CD Chandos anniversary Grainger set?

    Wonderful!
    Oooh! That sounds rather appealing.

    I've been wondering about that as well. Or, at least if they think Italian opera libretti are as strange as I find most Norwegian opera libretti to be.

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    I have no problem with just writing it out in english but there are certain advantages to using the correct italian markings. Mainly, the fact that any professional musician in the world will know exactly what you intend no matter what language they speak. It's not just tradition, it is also practical.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aksel View Post
    Oooh! That sounds rather appealing.
    Do you have dedicated Amazon in Norway? Here's a link to the set on the UK site.

    I pre-ordered and got 19 CDs for GBP44.95 (NOK 400), which I thought was a real bargain. Sold-off the few individual CDs I already had and made a quarter of it back to offset the expense.

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    Senior Member Aksel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Delicious Manager View Post
    Do you have dedicated Amazon in Norway? Here's a link to the set on the UK site.

    I pre-ordered and got 19 CDs for GBP44.95 (NOK 400), which I thought was a real bargain. Sold-off the few individual CDs I already had and made a quarter of it back to offset the expense.
    No, we don't, unfortunately. But that sounds rather brilliant. I'll have to look into that.

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    Administrator Krummhorn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kbmanonymous View Post
    what would be the best musical term to use in a piece of music that means dying away slowly. I found the term Mancando online but i don't think that's a common term. Is there a web site anyone knows where i can look up terms that are common and recognizable.
    I have used the Dolmetsch Online Music Dictionary at times. A pretty good resource to bookmark.

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    Senior Member Meaghan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aksel View Post
    Percy Grainger only wrote his markings in English. Some of them are rather hilarious. Like "Very slightly faster?".
    Other Grainger winners include "slowish, but not dragged, and wayward in time" and "don't drag; if anything, slightly faster."

    Quote Originally Posted by wingracer View Post
    I have no problem with just writing it out in english but there are certain advantages to using the correct italian markings. Mainly, the fact that any professional musician in the world will know exactly what you intend no matter what language they speak. It's not just tradition, it is also practical.
    Mahler's pervasive markings in German often require lists of translations to be handed out to musicians for them to write into their parts. This practice has spawned some pretty funny deliberate mistranslations:

    http://medicine-opera.com/2009/04/mahlers-markings/

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    Quote Originally Posted by Meaghan View Post
    Other Grainger winners include "slowish, but not dragged, and wayward in time" and "don't drag; if anything, slightly faster."

    Mahler's pervasive markings in German often require lists of translations to be handed out to musicians for them to write into their parts. This practice has spawned some pretty funny deliberate mistranslations:

    http://medicine-opera.com/2009/04/mahlers-markings/

    These are hilarious!

    Von hier ab unmerklich breiter werden – As if wild animals were gnawing on your liver

    I know the feeling
    Ann

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    Senior Member Aksel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Meaghan View Post
    Other Grainger winners include "slowish, but not dragged, and wayward in time" and "don't drag; if anything, slightly faster."
    Grainger's markings kick ***. I think I recognise some of those, actually.

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