Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 17
Like Tree2Likes

Thread: What CDs do you use to demonstrate the glories of your audio system?

  1. #1
    Newbies
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    5

    Default What CDs do you use to demonstrate the glories of your audio system?

    Hi folks! I'm a new guy on the block (quite ancient), and this is my first thread. My system is:- Thorens TD520 "Professional" deck with a Shure VST 5 cartridge, Arcam P37 SACD/CD player, Quad 99 pre amp, Quad 909 amp, ProAc Responce 2.5 speakers, Artisan "Ultimate Silver Dream" interconnects and Nordost "Solar Wind" speaker cable. The results please me, and when I wish to show the system off to a newcomer, I resort to the following CDs:-
    EVEREST Enrique Jorda and the London Symphony Orchestra in Falla "The Three-Cornered Hat"
    MERCURY (SACD) Paul Paray and the Detroit Symphony Orchestra in Suppe and Auber Overtures
    MERCURY Antal Dorati and the London Symphony Orchestra in Liszt's Hungarian Rhapsodies
    DECCA Antal Dorati and the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra in Respighi/Rossini ""Rossiniana"
    RCA (SACD) Arthur Fiedler and the Boston Pops Orchestra in Offenbach's "Gaite Parisienne"
    The list could be longer, but these are my current tops as great demonstration CDs. The Everest Falla is not first for nothing - it is the finest digital transfer of an analogue recording in my collection, and what a recording it is!
    I would be interested to learn what CDs others use as demos. My turntable does not get a lot of use these days, but that's another matter.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    309

    Default

    What is your audio system? Sometimes I will just play a very quiet album with Spanish Guitar (Parkening or John Williams) and you can easily hear the sound quality and whether there is any background noise on the system.

    Janacek Sinfonetta would be a louder test after that.
    Last edited by mitchflorida; Jun-10-2012 at 17:00.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Ukko's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    5,379

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fintan View Post
    Hi folks! I'm a new guy on the block (quite ancient), and this is my first thread. My system is:- Thorens TD520 "Professional" deck with a Shure VST 5 cartridge, Arcam P37 SACD/CD player, Quad 99 pre amp, Quad 909 amp, ProAc Responce 2.5 speakers, Artisan "Ultimate Silver Dream" interconnects and Nordost "Solar Wind" speaker cable. The results please me, and when I wish to show the system off to a newcomer, I resort to the following CDs:-
    EVEREST Enrique Jorda and the London Symphony Orchestra in Falla "The Three-Cornered Hat"
    MERCURY (SACD) Paul Paray and the Detroit Symphony Orchestra in Suppe and Auber Overtures
    MERCURY Antal Dorati and the London Symphony Orchestra in Liszt's Hungarian Rhapsodies
    DECCA Antal Dorati and the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra in Respighi/Rossini ""Rossiniana"
    RCA (SACD) Arthur Fiedler and the Boston Pops Orchestra in Offenbach's "Gaite Parisienne"
    The list could be longer, but these are my current tops as great demonstration CDs. The Everest Falla is not first for nothing - it is the finest digital transfer of an analogue recording in my collection, and what a recording it is!
    I would be interested to learn what CDs others use as demos. My turntable does not get a lot of use these days, but that's another matter.
    I'm going to make a wild guess: You are a Brit.

    My sound system is not of audiophiliac quality, so I don't do demos -except occasionally of my foolishness and/or incompetence. Your choice of demo discs strongly suggests that you are primarily a music nut and secondarily a sound nut.

    Hmm. That adds up to two nuts, which is pretty much standard for half the population.
    Last edited by Ukko; Jun-10-2012 at 17:46.
    PetrB likes this.
    Experience teaches you to recognize a mistake when you've made it again.
    - anonymous

  4. #4
    Newbies
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Sorry, but I thought I made it clear.
    "My system is:- Thorens TD520 "Professional" deck with a Shure VST 5 cartridge, Arcam P37 SACD/CD player, Quad 99 pre amp, Quad 909 amp, ProAc Responce 2.5 speakers, Artisan "Ultimate Silver Dream" interconnects and Nordost "Solar Wind" speaker cable."

  5. #5
    Newbies
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Hilltroll 72,
    Thanks for your reply. No, I'm not a brit, but an Irish nutter.
    Vaneyes likes this.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Ukko's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    5,379

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fintan View Post
    Hilltroll 72,
    Thanks for your reply. No, I'm not a brit, but an Irish nutter.
    I think I would have enjoyed a summer along the river Shannon.

    I was, of course, going by your Brit equipment. And according to the People's Opinion (in the US anyway) all classical music buffs are nutters.

    Glad you are with us, Fintan. Don't be a stranger.
    Experience teaches you to recognize a mistake when you've made it again.
    - anonymous

  7. #7
    Senior Member joen_cph's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Cph, Denmark
    Posts
    2,444

    Default

    Am not a sound buff either, but: nice to see some older recordings considered as reference material in that field.

    I´ve got the Fiedler/Offenbach and Paray/Auber+Suppé as LPs and will remember your opinion when listening to them;-).

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    1,122

  9. #9
    Senior Member PetrB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    9,921

    Default

    The two most difficult sounds to record and engineer well are voice and piano.

    If you really want to hear, without all the cloth of orchestral cosmetics, what your system does, and does not, I'd recommend a CD of the original DGG analog recording of Schubert's Winterreisse, with the late Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau, Gerald Moore, piano.

    Many a good system is more cosmetic than 'truthful,' i.e. the truthful ones tell you exactly what is on the record itself, including any foibles or quirks of engineering, splicing, etc. The old Columbia recordings of Stravinsky conducting Stravinsky had enough audible splices (sometimes a flute solo would have you sit up with alarm thinking, the player has moved from their section and is now sitting three back from the first violin!) Almost all of those have been transferred to CD, and I doubt those clearly engineered elements have been smoothed over in the transfer.

    A lot of the Angel-Seraphim catalogue from the 60's and early 70's are available in CD re-issue (now EMI) Whether it is the Poulenc Organ Concerto, his Gloria, or other repertoire, perhaps you'd be lucky to find a recording of Regine Crespin singing the Berlioz 'Les nuits d'été', much of that recording was done in a hall, not a studio. The policy was to take no more than three takes, spliced, of a through performance of any movement. The technology was fine, the CD's quite good. The two Poulenc works are, at times, heavy duty 'audio blowouts,' the Gloria, of course, involving that tricky vocal element. The Berlioz, well, sublime, and another 'test' due to the vocals.

  10. #10
    Senior Member PetrB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    9,921

    Default

    The two most difficult sounds to record and engineer well are voice and piano.

    If you really want to hear, without all the cloth of orchestral cosmetics, what your system does, and does not, I'd recommend a CD of the original DGG analog recording of Schubert's Winterreisse, with the late Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau, Gerald Moore, piano.

    Many a good system is more cosmetic than 'truthful,' i.e. the truthful ones tell you exactly what is on the record itself, including any foibles or quirks of engineering, splicing, etc. [My preference - I want to hear exactly what is on the record, and will not at all bother with 're-engineering' it by tweaking the EQ or other controls of the playback medium. - That is more the wont of the audiophile, who is often more interested in engineering sound than actually 'just listening' to a piece of music.]

    The old Columbia recordings of Stravinsky conducting Stravinsky had enough audible splices (sometimes a flute solo would have you sit up with alarm thinking, the player has moved from their section and is now sitting three back from the first violin!) Almost all of those have been transferred to CD, and I doubt those clearly engineered elements have been smoothed over in the transfer.

    A lot of the Angel-Seraphim catalogue from the 60's and early 70's are available in CD re-issue (now EMI) Whether it is the Poulenc Organ Concerto, his Gloria, or other repertoire, perhaps you'd be lucky to find a recording of Regine Crespin singing the Berlioz 'Les nuits d'été', much of the Angel-Seraphim recordings were done in halls, not studios.

    [Another marked taste of mine -- a recording done in a hall, with a spread of mics, is infinitely preferable to anything done in the most 'ideal' of recording studios.] The policy was to record a through performance of a movement, then to splice together at maximum no more than three segments from those full takes. The technology was fine, the CD's quite good. The two Poulenc works are, at times, range from heavy duty 'audio blowouts' going to pianissimo in other places. the Gloria, of course, involves that tricky vocal element, both chorus and solo soprano. The Berlioz, well, sublime, and another 'test' due to the vocals.

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    1,122

    Default


  12. #12
    Senior Member bigshot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Hollywood U.S.A.
    Posts
    3,776
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    I would add Ansermet's Three Cornered Hat and Dorati's Firebird and Rite of Spring on Decca.

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    309

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
    I would add Ansermet's Three Cornered Hat and Dorati's Firebird and Rite of Spring on Decca.

    Thanks for telling me about Three Cornered Hat, but I much prefer this more modern recording.


    71e4QA2uxUL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

  14. #14
    Senior Member Vaneyes's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    7,814

    Default

    I've often been impressed with the work of recording engineer Mike Hatch. Three examples: Handel Concerti Grossi, Op. 6 (Nos. 1 - 12) Guildhall String Ensemble (RCA, rec. 1987/88); RVW Oboe Concerto, Small/RLPO/Handley (EMI, rec. 1990); JS Bach Violin Concerti, Hope/COE (Warner, rec. 2005).

  15. #15
    Senior Member bigshot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Hollywood U.S.A.
    Posts
    3,776
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Munch's recording of Ravel's Daphnis et Chloe
    And I have a two CD set of the Royal Ballet with Ansermet that is one of the best recordings I've ever heard
    Last edited by bigshot; Jun-19-2012 at 22:36.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 16
    Last Post: Aug-11-2011, 16:48
  2. Picture of Your Audio or Video System
    By DarkAngel in forum Opera
    Replies: 67
    Last Post: Jul-22-2011, 06:02

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •