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Thread: Trumpet Help Requested

  1. #1
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    Default Trumpet Help Requested

    I'm self-learning the trumpet purely as a hobby. I've been "playing around with it" for about a year now. I haven't really been using the slide much. Especially since it doesn't slide easily on my cheap trumpet.

    But now I'm getting to the point where I feel that I'm probably going to need to start using it.

    I'm currently practicing the Ionian scales from low F# to high G. Should I be using the slide to help with the intonation when playing these scales?

    If so, are their certain notes that I should be using the slide to compensate for consistently?

    By that I mean, is it usually the same notes that need the slide, or do different notes require the slide depending on which scale your playing?

    Thanks for any feedback.

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    Senior Member Lunasong's Avatar
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    Last edited by Lunasong; Jun-14-2012 at 13:48.
    "To be a musician is a curse. To NOT be one is even worse." Jack Daney

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    Thanks, lot's of great infromation there!

    This is what I was looking for right now: (from the first site you linked to)

    Valve combinations:

    1 + 2 = sharp (use first slide).
    2 + 3 = flat (lip up, absolutely no slide).
    1 + 3 = sharp (use third slide).
    1 + 2 + 3 = very sharp (use first and third slide).

    I think I'm also having "ear training" problems. Because some scales sound "out of tune" to me even when I play them on my electronic keyboard, or via my sheet music program. And I know both of those are in tune. I guess I'll have to start using a tuning meter to be sure.

    Funny thing is that they don't sound out of tune when I play them on the guitar or saxophone.

    Anyway, thanks for the info, this is precisely what I was looking for.

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    Senior Member Lunasong's Avatar
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    Re tuning, you will enjoy this article on the even-tempered scale. Perhaps your ear is better than you think!
    http://www.jimloy.com/physics/scale.htm

    This one gives additional information.
    http://www.precisionstrobe.com/apps/...mp/temper.html
    "To be a musician is a curse. To NOT be one is even worse." Jack Daney

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    Yes, I'm well aware of the well-tempered system. I studied it in physics, and also in mathematics. Plus I used to tune my own pianos. I really haven't noticed problems with the scales as much with other instruments though as I have with the trumpet for some strange reason.

    But then again, I'm practicing scales in half steps now and maybe that's the cause of the problem.

    But that I mean that I'm playing entire scales that are a half-step apart in succession. I'm actually playing major scales (i.e. Ionian scales, not chromatic scales). But after I play a major scale, say F#, I then move on to playing the next scale that's a half-step higher, say G.

    Maybe if I break my scale practice up so that I'm practicing consecutive scales that are whole steps apart that might help.

    I'll try that. Maybe this doesn't have anything to do with the trumpet. Maybe it's just because I'm practicing scales in succession that are a semitone apart instead of a whole tone apart and that's somehow throwing me off.
    Last edited by Abracadabra; Jun-15-2012 at 02:12.

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    Junior Member Chopinator's Avatar
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    You might also practice your scales by adding a flat/sharp to the key signature each time.

    Add a Flat:
    C - F - Bb - Eb - Ab - Db - Gb - B - E - A - D - G - C
    Add a Sharp:
    C - G - D - A - E - B - F# - Db - Ab - Eb - Bb - F - C

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    That's not a bad idea Chopinator. Making large jumps like that in tonality does make it easier. That will help me remember the wheel of fifths better too.

    I actually changed my practice to start practicing scales that are a whole step apart in succession instead of a half-step apart. That actually did help quite a bit.

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