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Thread: What is this called?

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    Senior Member LordBlackudder's Avatar
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    Post What is this called?

    If I play C, G, C in the left hand, one note after the other.

    Lets say it is a broken chord accompanying the right hand.

    A popular sound i hear a lot.

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    Senior Member Norse's Avatar
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    If you're talking about chords, as in a C chord, then a G chord, then a C chord, you've heard that a million times because G is the dominant of C major. The chord on the fifth degree of the scale (the dominant) is considered the second most important chord in a key next to the tonic (which would be C Major in C major, basically the 'home chord'), because of e.g. it's 'magnetic pull' towards the tonic. This type of harmonic formula often ends phrases, and are called cadences. Not all cadences are dominant to tonic, but it's the most important in traditional harmony and is called the authentic cadence. If the chords are both in root position, it's even called the perfect authentic cadence.

    If you're just talking the bass moving a fifth up and then down again while the harmony in the right hand is C major throughout, I'm not sure if that has a particular name. I guess you could say that it changes from root position to second inversion and back to root position again?

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    Senior Member PetrB's Avatar
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    It is the outline of a perfect fifth without the third,

    A perfect fifth implies a triad, just without the qualifier of its major or minor third: as accompaniment, the melody would be supplying the color. The C-G establishes the key of C. If that later shifted to G-D, then it has modulated to the V of the scale.

    Chords require three distinct pitches to be called a chord. Technically, when there are just two pitches, it is a Dyad, not a chord.

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    Senior Member PetrB's Avatar
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    It is the outline of a perfect fifth without the third,

    A perfect fifth implies a triad, just without the qualifier of its major or minor third: as accompaniment, the melody would be supplying the color. The C-G establishes the key of C. If that later shifted to G-D, then it has modulated to the V of the scale.

    Chords require three distinct pitches to be called a chord. Technically, when there are just two pitches, it is a Dyad, not a chord.
    Last edited by PetrB; Jul-07-2012 at 07:14.
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    Senior Member Lunasong's Avatar
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    Senior Member Kopachris's Avatar
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    Or, if you're talking about C, G, then high C, it's also the "sunrise" motif from Richard Strauss' "Also Sprach Zarathustra."
    Nothing happens to me. -- Famous last words of Dr. John H. Watson

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    Senior Member BurningDesire's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kopachris View Post
    Or, if you're talking about C, G, then high C, it's also the "sunrise" motif from Richard Strauss' "Also Sprach Zarathustra."
    That is also a popular chordal accompaniment pattern in music by many Japanese composers, particularly Yuki Kajiura. It is a very open, ambiguous accompaniment which allows for many different things to occur over it naturally, and its also easy to play

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    Senior Member Klavierspieler's Avatar
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    Let's just call it "Steve." Okay?
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    Beautiful music reflects a beautiful Savior.

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    Senior Member millionrainbows's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LordBlackudder View Post
    If I play C, G, C in the left hand, one note after the other.

    Lets say it is a broken chord accompanying the right hand.

    A popular sound i hear a lot.
    It's called "oom." The "pa-pa" is played by the right hand.
    Your closing key is not the same,
    This gives the Masters pain;
    But Hans Sachs draws a rule from this:
    In Spring, it must be so! 'Tis plain!


    "In Spring! In the creation of art it must be as it is in Spring!" -Arnold Schoenberg

    "I think that all right-thinking people in this country are sick and tired of being told that ordinary, decent people are fed up in this country with being sick and tired. Iím certainly not! But Iím sick and tired of being told that I am!" - Monty Python

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