Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Is it possible to raise my vocal range?

  1. #1
    Newbies
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    1
    Post Thanks / Like

    Unhappy Is it possible to raise my vocal range?

    I was singing "The Phantom of the Opera" I reached the last note once but I find it hard to do it again so I'm not really sure if I can still reach it now so I was wondering if there is a way to raise my vocal range? Anyone? Please and Thank you

  2. #2
    Member AlainB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    80
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Vocal range will increase in time, assuming one has proper training and all; the opposite of said training could even result in vocal range loss, so patience is certainly a virtue here.

    Personally, when I started taking singing lessons near the end of 2011, I had a range of roughly 1.5 octave (F2-C4), most of which sounded horrible. I could barely sing C4 properly.

    Now my range, including the extremes, is from Eb2 (D2 at times) to G#4 (also at certain times). So yeah, no worries... it'll increase in time, but keep in mind that there's a limit eventually.
    My Singing – please do check it out and leave criticism if you have the time! =)

  3. #3
    Senior Member Meaghan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Portland, OR (US)
    Posts
    847
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Yes. The way to do it fairly quickly and effectively and without hurting yourself is to take lessons. People often assume singing to be instinctual, but there are definitely components of proper vocal technique that will allow you to sing higher and better that are not instinctual and require or almost require professional training. I did not take lessons for very long, but I expanded my range considerably in just the first couple months.

    One tip on singing high that my voice teacher gave me (though tips are no substitute for lessons) is to be "open" - mouth wide, lots of space in the back of the mouth and the throat, neck relaxed, and no straining for notes, because when you strain, you close yourself off and it comes out as a squeak at best.

  4. #4
    Newbies
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    8
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    The answer is yes. The chest voice can extend quite a bit in the upper and lower ranges, and the head voice can extend as far as you can take it. Adam Lopez can sing a c#8 in whistle voice, so head voice had a lot of potential.

    At any rate, extending your range will come from correct technique. I could say a good voice is something like 95% technique to make it sound less daunting, but it's really 100% technique. Don't force yourself; you can use bad technique for years and never get better.

    The best thing to do is get a vocal coach, but the least you can do is use this forum and other forums to help you. Try to ask more specific questions about this.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Ukko's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    6,171
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I've been told that the right sort of stimulus can raise the top end. Probably not musically useful though.
    I spent a fortune on deodorant before I realized that people don't like me anyway.

  6. #6
    Junior Member MarieTregubovich's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    17
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I don't know about increasing it, but there are certain warm ups that can definitely help you strengthen those higher notes. If I were you, I wouldn't sing high-ish Phantom of the Opera stuff (like, at the end of the theme song, am I right?) if it hurts. If if if if if if if if if it hurts, then you don't want to sing that for the sake of the health of your voice. (My friend did that, and her voice was so . . . hurt she had to stop singing for a year, and she lost 7 of her good high notes. That is a lot of notes to lose, and it's not worth losing them). There are some good vocal warm ups that can help you strengthen that part of your voice, though. For example, (my voice teacher just told me about this one) making chimpanzee noises on really high pitched staccato notes - with a great deal of breath support, of course- this doesn't hurt, and really when you do this, you warm up that higher range that you have. Also try things like going, "woo! WOO ! WOO!" I can't describe just by writing it, but bouncing on an 'ooh' with breath support, exercising that upper register really helps. If you're young, (like me, I'm 15, wuppa) then you still have a while to develop those good notes. Before I went to the voice teacher that I have now, I had a real problem with pushing, for sound to come out and be pretty and all, or forcing my voice to sing things with more force rather than just having the notes circulate through my head instead of being pushed out of my mouth in one direction, if that makes sense? That's what is good to do on those high notes. If nothing else works, you could always transpose the key. (No one is going to notice, except for those with perfect pitch, - like me xP - but there's hardly any of us around ) good luck and stay vocally healthy and awesome! =)

  7. Likes Alfredoz, SongQuestion liked this post
  8. #7
    New Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    1
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Thanks very much that is quite encouraging.

  9. Likes Pugg liked this post
  10. #8
    Senior Member Pugg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    28,511
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bhabhi86 View Post
    Thanks very much that is quite encouraging.
    Even after 4 years tips can be helpful, welcome to TaklClassical also.
    First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.
    "Mahatma Gandhi"

Similar Threads

  1. What age range do you fall in?
    By Air in forum Community Forum
    Replies: 50
    Last Post: Apr-03-2013, 18:29
  2. Vocal Range
    By Hazel in forum Vocal Music
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: Dec-25-2011, 18:52
  3. Anyone know anything about vocal range?
    By Maddiegirl in forum Opera
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: Oct-21-2011, 13:54
  4. Instrumental range
    By Aramis in forum Community Forum
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: Dec-08-2009, 17:21
  5. Easy range Sibelius
    By Rasa in forum Orchestral Music
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: May-12-2009, 12:08

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •