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Thread: The Jazz Hole

  1. #106
    Senior Member jim prideaux's Avatar
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    Jacob Young-Forever Young, new album on ECM-after repeated listenings I now 'get this' album, and of course any album that features the great Marcin Wasilewski has to be worth a listen!
    Last edited by jim prideaux; Jun-01-2014 at 23:41.
    'so where are the strong, who are the trusted and where is the harmony, sweet harmony?'
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  2. #107
    Senior Member (Ret) Alypius's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jim prideaux View Post
    Jacob Young-Forever Young, new album on ECM-after repeated listenings I now 'get this' album, and of course any album that features the great Marcin Wasilewski has to be worth a listen!
    Jim, This is hard on us Americans. We don't get the new release until June 17th. I look forward to picking it up on its release date.

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  4. #108
    Senior Member starthrower's Avatar
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    Any Ben Monder fans? He's one of the best chord players I've ever heard. I started with his first album Flux, and now I've got five CDs. The volume on this clip is a bit low, so turn it up!

    [YT]v=fMskXnq-1iQ[/YT]

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  6. #109
    Senior Member (Ret) Alypius's Avatar
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    I've heard only a portion of his discography (as a bandleader). Of those, my favorite is Oceana (2005):





    I've enjoyed a lot of his work as a sideman, notably for Donny McCaslin's In Pursuit (Sunnyside, 2007) (and other of McCaslin's releases) and for Taylor Haskins' Recombination (2011):



    Here's a live performance of one track from McCaslin's group:



    Here's a track from Taylor Haskin's Recombination in which Monder plays a big role:

    Last edited by Alypius; Jun-02-2014 at 06:13.

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  8. #110
    Senior Member norman bates's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by starthrower View Post
    Any Ben Monder fans? He's one of the best chord players I've ever heard.
    Harmonically he's one of the most advanced guitarists I know... I've mixed feelings about his own albums, but I love this rendition of Autumn in New York with Julia Dollison, a piece written in the thirties (altough admittedly one of the most sophisticated songs in the american songbook) that sounds truly contemporary.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vIcXfMQu1r4
    Last edited by norman bates; Jun-02-2014 at 14:56.

  9. #111
    Senior Member Blake's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by starthrower View Post
    Any Ben Monder fans? He's one of the best chord players I've ever heard. I started with his first album Flux, and now I've got five CDs. The volume on this clip is a bit low, so turn it up!
    Yea, Monder is pretty awesome. I have his Hydra and Oceana albums in my library that I still need to dive further in. He's very experimental from what I remember.

  10. #112
    Senior Member (Ret) Alypius's Avatar
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    Some more contemporary jazz pianists:

    Aaron Goldberg and Guillermo Klein, Bienestan (Sunnyside, 2011)



    Here's a link to a complete track, "Burrito":
    http://sunnysidezone.com/track/burrito

    Goldberg and Klein are both pianists. On this, Goldberg plays the acoustic keyboard, Klein, the fender rhodes. Sometimes they have a backing band, sometimes, it's just them. A great album.

    Aaron Parks, Invisible Cinema (Blue Note, 2008)



    Parks apprenticed under trumpeter Terence Blanchard, playing in Blanchard's band for a number of years. In 2008, he released his first record as a bandleader and it was stunning. Deeply melodic, well composed. One of the best tracks is "Harvesting Dance" (which also appears on one of Blanchard's records):

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aD6qOGlqYyo

    But then silence. He popped up occasionally, notably as the pianist in a jazz supergroup with Joshua Redman (tenor sax), Eric Harland (drums), and Matt Penman (bass) entitled James Farm (2011). Again silence, then last year:

    Aaron Parks, Arborescence (ECM, 2013)



    This is solo piano, an improvised record, mostly midtempo, mostly meditative. It does not reveal itself on first hearing. I found it came to grab me slowly. Often I let it play as a quiet first-play record in the morning. One of the better releases of last year. Link to the opening track:

    http://player.ecmrecords.com/aaron-parks--arborescence
    Last edited by Alypius; Jun-03-2014 at 21:45.

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  12. #113
    Senior Member Blake's Avatar
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    Aaron Parks is great. I really enjoy those two albums above.

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  14. #114
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    Anything with Grant Green playing guitar. Anything....
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2PfCIDkaW_g
    Last edited by LucusT; Jun-09-2014 at 03:17. Reason: typo

  15. #115
    Senior Member cwarchc's Avatar
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    “How wonderful it is that nobody need wait a single moment before starting to improve the world.”

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  17. #116
    Senior Member (Ret) Alypius's Avatar
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    A pair of excellent new releases:

    David Binney, Anacapa (CrissCross, 2014)



    Released yesterday (June 10th). One listen thus far. Excellent overall, but especially the title track. Available for listening on Spotify. BTW, I don't get the cover. Is that Binney? Doesn't look like him.

    Angles 9, Injuries (Clean Feed, 2014)



    Bold, a bit edgy, but excellent.

    Forthcoming this month:

    Jacob Young - Forever Young (ECM) - June 17
    Keith Jarrett and Charlie Haden - Last Dance (ECM) - June 17
    Matthew Halsall - When the World Was One - June 17
    Joshua Redman - Trios Live - June 17
    Bobby Hutcherson - Enjoy the View - June 24
    Steve Lehman - Mise Em Abime - June 24
    Ginger Baker - Why? - June 24
    Wolfgang Muthspiel - Driftwood - June 24

    Last edited by Alypius; Jun-11-2014 at 21:40.

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  19. #117
    Senior Member starthrower's Avatar
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    Getting into some of Elvin Jones's Blue Note albums of the late 60s & early 70s.
    This one here is great, but not currently available. Several others I ordered from CD Japan.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dHqH...EEPOpAY8-oST10

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    I found this article - http://www.thedailybeast.com/article...eeds-love.html - through a link titled "Can Starbucks Save Jazz?"

    Ok, so that was intentionally provocative and it worked - the world and I are both worse for it. Of course Starbucks cannot save Jazz and if Jazz were the kind of thing Starbucks could save it wouldn't be much worth saving.

    Actually it has an interesting conclusion:

    I’m convinced that there’s a lesson here for jazz advocacy groups. Face it, the battle to improve the image of the art form is over, and those who fought for respectability get credit for winning the fight. Now we need to rise to the next challenge and remind listeners how much pleasure they can find in this music.

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  22. #119
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    Quote Originally Posted by science View Post
    I found this article - http://www.thedailybeast.com/article...eeds-love.html - through a link titled "Can Starbucks Save Jazz?"

    Ok, so that was intentionally provocative and it worked - the world and I are both worse for it. Of course Starbucks cannot save Jazz and if Jazz were the kind of thing Starbucks could save it wouldn't be much worth saving.

    Actually it has an interesting conclusion:
    Great article. Sad, though. And Starbucks sucks. Panera has much better coffee.

  23. #120
    Senior Member (Ret) Alypius's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by science View Post
    I found this article - http://www.thedailybeast.com/article...eeds-love.html - through a link titled "Can Starbucks Save Jazz?"

    Ok, so that was intentionally provocative and it worked - the world and I are both worse for it. Of course Starbucks cannot save Jazz and if Jazz were the kind of thing Starbucks could save it wouldn't be much worth saving.
    An interesting article, and its author, Ted Gioia, is one of the finest jazz historians out there (History of Jazz [Oxford University Press, 2011]). So his perspectives are worth paying close attention to. As a regular customer of Starbucks and Peet's, I appreciate going to somewhere that picks good jazz as its soundtrack. (I go a little crazy at banks or grocery stores with their "Best of the 80s" mixes). One consolation, as Gioia points out, is that there is nothing watered down about Starbuck's and Peet's choices: "None of this music came from the 'smooth jazz' or 'fusion jazz' categories that, according to conventional wisdom, possess crossover appeal for the general public." Instead, they play the real deal: Miles Davis, John Coltrane, Horace Silver, Dave Brubeck. Yes, it's dated. But I think it may have a positive effect over the long run. His conclusion which Science quoted is right on the mark. The single biggest challenge is for contemporary jazz artists to catch the wave, to bring all those people exposed hour after hour to classic jazz and get them to take the next and hear the innovative and creative contemporary jazz world, to get them to go jazz clubs, to attend jazz concerts and festivals, to buy the music. No easy task. Jazz ever since Charlie Parker and the bebop revolution has ceased to be a dancehall music and become an art music geared to an elite audience (and by "elite," I don't mean wealth -- since most jazz audiences over the last 70 years have not been wealthy; I mean people with ears for advanced music). The question is whether jazz, like classical, can continue to attract its elite audience.

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