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Thread: The Jazz Hole

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    Senior Member Blake's Avatar
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    Default The Jazz Hole

    I'm going to test this out here. I see quite a few members have been posting a solid bit of great Jazz listenings… So, I figured it'd be pretty cool if we could have a thread entirely dedicated to all things Jazz. And I mean anything - From the early beginnings of the late 19th century, to Bebop/Hard-Bop, to Avant-Garde, and on to the Moon.

    Post whatever you want... videos, pictures, news… This is a free-range.

    I've been in a Bebop/Hard-Bop dig lately, so I'll impart this cool little documentary where Bob Cranshaw talks about his time with Lee Morgan.



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    Quote Originally Posted by Vesuvius View Post
    I'm going to test this out here. I see quite a few members have been posting a solid bit of great Jazz listenings… So, I figured it'd be pretty cool if we could have a thread entirely dedicated to all things Jazz. And I mean anything - From the early beginnings of the late 19th century, to Bebop/Hard-Bop, to Avant-Garde, and on to the Moon.

    Post whatever you want... videos, pictures, news… This is a free-range.

    I've been in a Bebop/Hard-Bop dig lately, so I'll impart this cool little documentary where Bob Cranshaw talks about his time with Lee Morgan.


    @ Vesuvius, What a great idea for a thread! I've been on something of a Miles Davis, Sonny Rollins and Eric Dolphy "kick" lately. I shall definitely have some YouTube and or Spotify contributions to make in future. Lee Morgan also happens to be one of my favorites as well. Good find.
    Last edited by samurai; May-09-2014 at 06:00.
    Whatever floats your boat

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    Senior Member Blake's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by samurai View Post
    @ Vesuvius, What a great idea for a thread! I've been on something of a Miles Davis, Sonny Rollins and Eric Dolphy "kick" lately. I shall definitely have some YouTube and or Spotify contributions to make in future. Lee Morgan also happens to be one of my favorites as well. Good find.
    Excellent. I've seen you make a lot of healthy jazz contributions. Post whatever you want! This thread is really just an open bag, or "hole," so anyone who's into Jazz can throw in or check out what's here.

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    I simply love this piece by Trane:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=MZY4TQzv3HU
    Whatever floats your boat

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    Senior Member Blake's Avatar
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    This is a neat glimpse of a time when Jazz was really on the up in innovation. Brubeck talking about wanting to further investigate odd time signatures, polytones and polyrhythms…

    Last edited by Blake; May-09-2014 at 06:47.

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    Speaking of jazz, Charles Mingus's The Black Saint and the Sinner Lady was the album which left a HUGE impression on me in college (along with Coltrane's A Love Supreme). I guess these two have to be at the top of best albums in jazz history. Anyway, here is a track from Mingus' album that absolutely blew me to the wall every time I blasted it from my speakers... (to my friends' chagrin, those with really conservative or non-existent musical tastes)




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    Default Darcy James Argue - Grand Opening, Brooklyn Babylon


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    Default Wayne Shorter Quartet - Pegasus


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    Default Craig Taborn - light made lighter


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    Great idea for a thread, thanks Vesuvius.

    What do you all understand by the term 'hard bop'? How does it differ from 'bebop'?

    I pick up more variety in the later hard bop, ie use of earlier styles, plus elements like Latin, but I have to say I'm a bit vague as to the distinctions between the two.

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    Default Bill Evans with Marian McPartland | a conversation & demonstrations

    Vesuvius, I love this thread! Tear me away from baroque and the romantics, and I’ll listen to a couple of hours of jazz.

    Here are four half-hour videos of a conversation between Evans and McPartland, who demonstrated how players create together to produce jazz. I suppose I’ll be forever fascinated by sounds of jazz and the spontaneous intuitive recall of inventiveness during rehearsals and performances!

    [yt]v=GIfHtPwF8wY[/yt][yt]v=WRH6W3YVgYw[/yt][yt]v=2y9g0EQcZXI[/yt][yt]v=J57aV37Uttw[/yt]

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    Senior Member Blake's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wood View Post
    Great idea for a thread, thanks Vesuvius.

    What do you all understand by the term 'hard bop'? How does it differ from 'bebop'?

    I pick up more variety in the later hard bop, ie use of earlier styles, plus elements like Latin, but I have to say I'm a bit vague as to the distinctions between the two.
    Bebop was the foundation that Hard-bop extended from.

    -Bop-
    Also known as bebop, Bop was a radical new music that developed gradually in the early '40s and exploded in 1945. The main difference between bop and swing is that the soloists engaged in chordal (rather than melodic) improvisation, often discarding the melody altogether after the first chorus and using the chords as the basis for the solo. Ensembles tended to be unisons, most jazz groups were under seven pieces, and the soloist was free to get as adventurous as possible as long as the overall improvisation fit into the chord structure.

    Since the virtuoso musicians were getting away from using the melodies as the basis for their solos (leading some listeners to ask "Where's the melody?") and some of the tempos were very fast, bop divorced itself from popular music and a dancing audience, uplifting jazz to an art music but cutting deeply into its potential commercial success. Ironically the once-radical bebop style has become the foundation for all of the innovations that followed and now can be almost thought of as establishment music. Among its key innovators were altoist Charlie Parker, trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie, pianist Bud Powell, drummer Max Roach, and pianist/composer Thelonious Monk.


    -Hard-Bop-
    Although some history books claim that Hard Bop arose as a reaction to the softer sounds featured in cool jazz, it was actually an extension of bop that largely ignored West Coast jazz. The main differences between hard bop and bop are that the melodies tend to be simpler and often more "soulful"; the rhythm section is usually looser, with the bassist not as tightly confined to playing four-beats-to-the-bar as in bop; a gospel influence is felt in some of the music; and quite often, the saxophonists and pianists sound as if they were quite familiar with early rhythm & blues.

    Since the prime time period of hard bop (1955-70) was a decade later than bop, these differences were a logical evolution and one can think of hard bop as bop of the '50s and '60s. By the second half of the 1960s, the influence of the avant garde was being felt and some of the more adventurous performances of the hard bop stylists (such as Jackie McLean and Lee Morgan) fell somewhere between the two styles. With the rise of fusion and the sale of Blue Note (hard bop's top label) in the late '60s, the style fell on hard times although it was revived to a certain extent in the 1980s. Much of the music performed by the so-called Young Lions during the latter decade (due to other influences altering their style) was considered modern mainstream, although some groups (such as the Harper Brothers and T.S. Monk's sextet) have kept the 1960s' idiom alive.


    By the way, great posts fellas.

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    Vesuvius, Great idea for a thead. I had in mind something similiar. I first began listening to jazz in the late 60s, and I have been following developments pretty intensely for the last 20 years.

    As a teacher, I’ve tried to find creative ways to introduce my students to jazz, to give them some sense both of its enormously rich history and of its wide-ranging and very creative contemporary practitioners. One of the techniques I’ve been working on in recent years is creating sets of playlists, given that most of my students listen to things on their iPods / iPhones. In creating these playlists, I’ve put some tough restrictions on my selections, namely, to make sure any given playlist would fit on a single CD and thus be under 80 minutes. I’ve deliberately chosen a wide spread of things (generally no more than one track per record -- though a few exceptions), but tried to sequence them so that there is a good flow from track to track. While I do try to give a range of artists and albums, I’m concerned less with completeness and more with capturing my students' attention, so that they’ll begin to pursue things on their own initiative. I’ve tried to set out the history of jazz over the last 50 or so years (56 to be precise), keeping it limited to 6 playlists that are the equivalent of 6 CDs. So I post this in hopes that it might prove useful to newcomers who happen to explore this realm of the forum. I don’t want to overload this post. So I’ll distribute the 6 playlists over 3 postings.

    Playlist #1: Miles Davis

    1. So What (9:25) (from Miles Davis, Kind of Blue, 1959)
    2. Flamenco Sketches (9:26) (from Miles Davis, Kind of Blue, 1959)
    3. Milestones (5:46) (from Miles Davis, Milestones, 1958)
    4. Summertime (3:21) (from Miles Davis, Porgy & Bess, 1958)
    5. Joshua (7:00) (from Miles Davis, Seven Steps to Heaven, 1963)
    6. Eighty-One (6:18) (from Miles Davis, E.S.P., 1965)
    7. Masqualero (8:54) (from Miles Davis, Sorcerer, 1967)
    8. Pharaoh’s Dance (20:07) (from Miles Davis, Bitches Brew, 1969)
    9. Black Satin (5:20) (from Miles Davis, On the Corner, 1972)
    10. Time After Time (3:41) (from Miles Davis, Essential Miles Davis, 1986)

    Playlist #2: John Coltrane

    1. Blue Train (10:44) (from John Coltrane, Blue Train, 1957)
    2. Giant Steps (4:47) (from John Coltrane, Giant Steps, 1960)
    3. Naima (4:25) (from John Coltrane, Giant Steps, 1960)
    4. Impressions (6:32) (from John Coltrane, Coltrane (Impulse!), 1962)
    5. Wise One (9:04) (from John Coltrane, Crescent, 1964)
    6. Afro Blue (10:53) (from John Coltrane, Live at Birdland, 1963)
    7. In a Sentimental Mood (4:17) (from Duke Ellington & John Coltrane, 1962)
    8. Africa (16:29) (from John Coltrane, Africa / Brass Sessions, 1961)
    9. Acknowledgement (7:43) (from John Coltrane, A Love Supreme, 1964)
    Last edited by Alypius; May-09-2014 at 17:23.

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    (Continuation of above). Here's two more playlists

    Playlist #3: The Blue Note Era (1960s)

    1. Stolen Moments (8:47) (from Oliver Nelson, The Blues and the Abstract Truth, 1961)
    2. Song for My Father (7:18) (from Horace Silver, Song for My Father, 1964)
    3. Lazy Afternoon (5:35) (from Pete La Roca [& Joe Henderson], Basra, 1965)
    4. The Sidewinder (10:25) (from Lee Morgan, The Sidewinder, 1963)
    5. Midnight Blue (4:02) (from Kenny Burrell, Midnight Blue, 1963)
    6. Maiden Voyage (7:57) (from Herbie Hancock, Maiden Voyage, 1965)
    7. Speak No Evil (8:24) (from Wayne Shorter, Speak No Evil, 1966)
    8. Footprints (7:30) (from Wayne Shorter, Adam’s Apple, 1966)
    9. If 6:42 (6:47) (from Larry Young, Unity, 1966)
    10. Free for All (11:09) (from Art Blakey & the Jazz Messengers, Free for All, 1964)

    Playlist #4: The Fusion Years (1970s)

    1. Watermelon Man (6:32) (from Herbie Hancock, Head Hunters, 1973)
    2. Tell Me a Bedtime Story (5:05) (from Herbie Hancock, Mwandishi, 1971)
    3. Meeting of the Spirits (6:54) (from Mahavishnu Orchestra, Inner Mounting Flame, 1971)
    4. Hope (2:00) (from Mahavishnu Orchestra, Birds of Fire, 1973)
    5. Vulcan Worlds (7:54) (from Return to Forever, Where Have I Known You Before, 1974 / reissue: Anthology, 2008)
    6. Black Market (6:34) (from Weather Report, Black Market, 1976 / reissue: Forecast: Tomorrow, 2006)
    7. Birdland (5:58) (from Weather Report, Heavy Weather, 1977 / reissue: Forecast: Tomorrow, 2006)
    8. Bright Size Life (4:46) (from Pat Metheny, Bright Size Life, 1975)
    9. Conference of the Birds (4:42) (from Dave Holland, Conference of the Birds, 1973)
    10. Waterwheel (9:21) (from Ralph Towner, Batik, 1978 / 2008)
    11. Timeless (11:59) (from John Abercrombie, Timeless, 1974)
    12. Part IIC (5:36) (from Keith Jarrett, The Köln Concert, 1975)

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    Playlist #5: Post-Modern Postbop (1990-2005)

    1. Blue Heaven (6:23) (from Dave Douglas, Soul on Soul, 1999)
    2. Sweet Sorrow (8:43) (from Joshua Redman, Mood Swing, 1994)
    3. Lotus Flower (5:52) (from Steve Turre, Lotus Flower, 1999)
    4. Prime Directive (7:46) (from Dave Holland Quintet, Prime Directive, 1999)
    5. Upswing (6:56) (from Dave Holland Big Band, What Goes Around, 2001)
    6. Blues Dream (2:32) (from Bill Frisell, Blues Dream, 2001)
    7. Shenandoah (6:11) (from Bill Frisell, Good Dog, Happy Man, 1999)
    8. The Persistence of Memory (4:40) (from Dave Douglas, In Our Lifetime, 1994)
    9. Gevurah (6:52) (from John Zorn / Bar Kokhba, The Circle Maker, 1998)
    10. Harvesting Dance (11:43) (from Terence Blanchard, Flow, 2005)
    11. River Man (9:00) (from Brad Mehldau, Live in Tokyo, 2003)



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