View Poll Results: What is your age?

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  • 0-10 (this will be interesting!)

    1 0.94%
  • 11-20

    12 11.32%
  • 21-30

    28 26.42%
  • 31-40

    13 12.26%
  • 41-50

    17 16.04%
  • 51-60

    21 19.81%
  • 61-70

    12 11.32%
  • 71-80

    1 0.94%
  • 81-90

    0 0%
  • 91+

    1 0.94%
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Thread: Age

  1. #76
    Senior Member SeptimalTritone's Avatar
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    In other words, a true mathematician never makes an assumption that cannot be rigorously justified, ever.

    On the other hand, sometimes the most "trustworthy" stuff is beyond the numbers and the rigour. I would encourage you to read this short little article (by a grown up prodigy) on mathematical rigour

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  3. #77
    Senior Member aleazk's Avatar
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    In the 18th century and part of the 19th century, most of the mathematical research by professional mathematicians was done by methods that we would consider quite sloppy and unrigorous by modern standards ('differentials', 'infinite sums', 'variations', and many other things). The 'rigour wave' started in the 19th century with guys like Cauchy, Weierstrass and Bolzano. They gave to calculus its modern solid foundation, including the epsilon-delta definition for limits. At the beginning of the 20th century, the very hard core notion of rigour that we have today in modern mathematics was crystallized by people like Hilbert.

    Nevertheless, in fields like physics (my field), the story is very different! Often, physicists have to develop mathematical tools by their own in order to explain what nature seems to require. Of course, this is done intuitively and in an unrigorous fashion. Only years later, or even decades, mathematicians jump in and give to the concepts a solid, rigorous foundation.

    There's a very funny anecdote in which von Neumann (one of the most brilliant mathematicians of the 20th century, whose most important work in physics was a very rigorous and fundamental mathematical formalization of quantum mechanics) says to Heisenberg "thanks to you and your discovery of quantum mechanics, I was able to discover the difference between a self-adjoint operator and one which is only merely symmetric, and, of course, the importance that this has in quantum mechanics". Heisenberg, a pure physicist, answered "what's a symmetric operator?".

    Even in modern physics, and particularly in modern Quantum Field Theory, there's a lot of very important things in the standard theory that lack a rigorous definition (e.g., the measures in the path integrals, and a big etc.) Nevertheless, physicists make mathematical jugglings with these little ill-defined monsters and manage to obtain meaningful physical predictions from this mess. Astonishingly, these predictions have been proven to be very accurate in the experiments.

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  5. #78
    Senior Member aleazk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SeptimalTritone View Post
    I do hope that when you get older and apply to colleges, that you apply to some in the U.S., including Caltech!!! Yes, I must send out propaganda
    LOL that's what I call tact...

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  7. #79
    Moderator TurnaboutVox's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MoonlightSonata View Post
    That's because I'm rather unusual, to say the least
    Oho, intriguing. Why are you 'rather unusual, to say the least'? Apart from being a 13 year old CM fan and a mathematician, that is?

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  9. #80
    Senior Member aleazk's Avatar
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    The unusual secret in @MoonlightSonata's backyard revealed!



  10. #81
    Senior Member Couac Addict's Avatar
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    I just cut myself in half and counted 34 rings. If my memories of science class serve me correctly, it means that I need an ambulance.
    This space for rent.

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  12. #82
    Senior Member SeptimalTritone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by aleazk View Post
    Even in modern physics, and particularly in modern Quantum Field Theory, there's a lot of very important things in the standard theory that lack a rigorous definition (e.g., the measures in the path integrals, and a big etc.) Nevertheless, physicists make mathematical jugglings with these little ill-defined monsters and manage to obtain meaningful physical predictions from this mess. Astonishingly, these predictions have been proven to be very accurate in the experiments.
    Dude, thank God we don't have to rigorously justify ultraviolet cutoff and renormalization to get the magnetic moment of the electron (i.e. accurate experimental result).

    Sloppy calculus for life

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  14. #83
    Senior Member SeptimalTritone's Avatar
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    But actually aleazk, I had this Isaac Asimov article more in mind, which has importance beyond the rigours of quantum operators.

    The article answers MoonlightSonata's grand question: how did I know he was 13 and not 89?

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  16. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ingélou View Post
    Voting is anonymous, so at least you don't get the problem of older people not wanting to reveal their age. Women especially are very mysterious. I am not, simply because I like to talk about my experiences and my age would quickly become apparent anyway. Also, my granny was six years older than grandad - they'd been engaged for six years when they married at the ages of thirty and twenty-four, after he came back from WWI. She was very sensitive about this, and would head off any not-so-innocent inquiries from her grandchildren. She only owned up once she was well into her nineties. I just don't think I could be bothered with all that mystery.
    I am 57 in a few months. My wife preceeded me to this age by six months and for half a year, I never let her forget it.
    The poll suggests the average age of the respondents is younger than the average age of Concerts that I attend. Taggert thought the geezers would be scared off but the OP did make the votes anonymous. I think the reason is that younger people are more inclined to be on line, in social media, etc, and therefore more likely to be represented in an Internet Forum.

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  18. #85
    Senior Member MoonlightSonata's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by aleazk View Post
    The unusual secret in @MoonlightSonata's backyard revealed!


    At least you haven't found my Raff dog.
    ≥12

  19. #86
    Senior Member aleazk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SeptimalTritone View Post
    Dude, thank God we don't have to rigorously justify ultraviolet cutoff and renormalization to get the magnetic moment of the electron (i.e. accurate experimental result).

    Sloppy calculus for life
    -"Infinities? just subtract them!..."



    (this 'subtraction' thingy can be made more rigorous, though, we are not that disastrous!)

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  21. #87
    Senior Member aleazk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SeptimalTritone View Post
    But actually aleazk, I had this Isaac Asimov article more in mind, which has importance beyond the rigours of quantum operators.

    The article answers MoonlightSonata's grand question: how did I know he was 13 and not 89?
    Oh, I see. Yes, Asimov is quite right there, and what he says is the obvious answer that those post-modern relativists and extreme Kuhnians refuse to see.

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  23. #88
    Icarus
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    I'm 31 in hexadecimal, approaching the big 3 2 !!
    Last edited by Icarus; Oct-20-2014 at 22:58.

  24. #89
    Icarus
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    Quote Originally Posted by MoonlightSonata View Post
    Incidentally, why did you assume I was 13 and not 89? I suppose it would be quite obvious. I never stated which one, though.
    Bayesian probability.

  25. #90
    Senior Member HaydnBearstheClock's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TalkingHead View Post
    Today, I am younger than the age at which Beethoven died and older than that of Mozart's demise. Now if you will excuse me, I have to get back to completing my Ninth Symphony in D-flat minor, which I have only just realized I had never even thought about til just now.
    oo, D-Flat minor, come to think of it, I've never heard a piece in that key. I'm waiting, TH.

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