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Thread: What are your favorite pieces of Religious music?

  1. #31
    Senior Member Pugg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HarrietPowell View Post
    Bach St Matthew's Passion- especially the aria "Erbarme Dich" I like Nathalie Stutzmann's rendition the best. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jeil9S2exIU
    You are right about Bach, but a lot of alto's sung /singing that aria beautiful.
    First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.
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  2. #32
    Senior Member JosefinaHW's Avatar
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    I like the Stutzmann rendition too, as well as Magdalena Kozena in the second performance (chronologically last performance) in the Digital Concert Hall.
    Last edited by JosefinaHW; Aug-03-2016 at 23:12.

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    My friend is listening to Faure Requiem and well, I've joined too...and I realized that in this requiem there is no Dies Irae, that's quite a curious thing, isn't it?
    Man muss das Leben tanzen

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  5. #34
    Senior Member Pugg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by helenora View Post
    My friend is listening to Faure Requiem and well, I've joined too...and I realized that in this requiem there is no Dies Irae, that's quite a curious thing, isn't it?
    Never thought of that, here is some reading in case you want.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Requiem_(Faur%C3%A9)
    First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.
    "Mahatma Gandhi"

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  7. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pugg View Post
    Never thought of that, here is some reading in case you want.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Requiem_(Faur%C3%A9)
    yes, I've already checked it....good information
    Man muss das Leben tanzen

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  9. #36
    Senior Member Traverso's Avatar
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    What first come to my mind....

    Bach Motets
    Bach cantata Gottes Zeit is die allerbeste Zeit BWC 106
    Bach Matthäus-Passion Leonhardt
    Bach Hohe messe Leonhardt
    Palestrina Canticum Canticorum Hilliard
    Desprez Déploration sur la mort de Johannes Ockeghem Hilliard
    John Sheppard Media Vita Tallis Scholars
    Taverner Missa Gloria tibi Trinitas Andrew Parrott
    Monteverdi Vespro della Beata Vergine Andrew Parrott
    Gregorian chant



    No Beethoven,no Mozart,Faure,Brahms etc.I consider them ( my opinion) more as concert pieces.
    I love the missa Solemnis but not in this list.

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  11. #37
    Senior Member JosefinaHW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by helenora View Post
    My friend is listening to Faure Requiem and well, I've joined too...and I realized that in this requiem there is no Dies Irae, that's quite a curious thing, isn't it?
    I know we're not supposed to talk about theology in this section of the forum, but in this context.... In my not so humble opinion, Requiems, particularly the Dies Irae, are GREAT music, but horrific theology. The most useful or acceptable way of listening to the Dies Irae as theology is as a test or tool to see what you need to work on in your spiritual/personal development--this goes hand-in-hand with Last Judgement art. When you listen to a Dies Irae or look at a Last Judgement, you examine your conscience and ask is there anyone that I can imagine--with even the slightest glee or satisfaction--failing (or even being subject to) such judgement and being condemned to pain, suffering, annhilation. If you answer yes to yourself, well then, you know you have to work on forgiveness, humility, etc., etc.,....

    But, again, as music to delight the senses, I love to play many requiems.

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  13. #38
    Senior Member Pugg's Avatar
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    Unmissable for religious music lovers.
    First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.
    "Mahatma Gandhi"

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  15. #39
    Senior Member JosefinaHW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by helenora View Post
    My friend is listening to Faure Requiem and well, I've joined too...and I realized that in this requiem there is no Dies Irae, that's quite a curious thing, isn't it?
    :Greetings Helenora: I would imagine that you made the connection of my post #37 to your post here. I think that Faure also realized that the Dies Irae as it has been traditionally understood was inappropriate for a funeral mass, so he eliminated it. I'm very glad he had the wisdom and courage to do that.

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  17. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by JosefinaHW View Post
    :Greetings Helenora: I would imagine that you made the connection of my post #37 to your post here. I think that Faure also realized that the Dies Irae as it has been traditionally understood was inappropriate for a funeral mass, so he eliminated it. I'm very glad he had the wisdom and courage to do that.
    yes, I think he followed the initial meaning behind the word "requiem"- rest, repose.
    Man muss das Leben tanzen

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  19. #41
    Junior Member Bachiana's Avatar
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    Josquin Desprez: Missa L'Homme armé sext toni, Agnus Dei, as sung by The Tallis Scholars. Absolutely number 1 for me. It is the music I want to hear in heaven. This is one of the most magical pieces of music ever written, especially the third "Agnus Dei", which begins at about 3:45:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7yEZwpANUO0

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  21. #42
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    I'm not sure if this counts, but Forrest's "Entreat me not to leave you" is one of my favorites. It's the story of Ruth

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  23. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charl View Post
    I'm not sure if this counts, but Forrest's "Entreat me not to leave you" is one of my favorites. It's the story of Ruth
    That's a good one. There aren't enough pieces about Ruth. Have you heard Knut Nystedt? He writes in a similar way.
    Last edited by Manxfeeder; Sep-10-2016 at 01:01.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Traverso View Post
    What first come to my mind....

    Bach Motets
    Bach cantata Gottes Zeit is die allerbeste Zeit BWC 106
    Bach Matthäus-Passion Leonhardt
    Bach Hohe messe Leonhardt
    Palestrina Canticum Canticorum Hilliard
    Desprez Déploration sur la mort de Johannes Ockeghem Hilliard
    John Sheppard Media Vita Tallis Scholars
    Taverner Missa Gloria tibi Trinitas Andrew Parrott
    Monteverdi Vespro della Beata Vergine Andrew Parrott
    Gregorian chant



    No Beethoven,no Mozart,Faure,Brahms etc.I consider them ( my opinion) more as concert pieces.
    I love the missa Solemnis but not in this list.
    So... the Enlightenment destroyed all religious sentiment from the world, eh? :J
    Wäre das Faktum wahr, – wäre der außerordentliche Fall wirklich eingetreten, daß die politische Gesetzgebung der Vernunft übertragen, der Mensch als Selbstzweck respektiert und behandelt, das Gesetz auf den Thron erhoben, und wahre Freiheit zur Grundlage des Staatsgebäudes gemacht worden, so wollte ich auf ewig von den Musen Abschied nehmen, und dem herrlichsten aller Kunstwerke, der Monarchie der Vernunft, alle meine Thätigkeit widmen.

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  27. #45
    Senior Member Woodduck's Avatar
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    For me Bach's B-minor Mass is cosmic in its scope and power, and as spiritually rich and comprehensive a musical work as has ever been written or ever will be. In my college years I went out of my way to attend every performance of it in geographical proximity (not hard to find in music-filled New England). One of my my fellow music students liked to call it the "B-minus mass." I'd call it A+++.

    My other favorite piece of religious music is Wagner's Parsifal. Wagner was actually an atheist, and used religious symbols for his own purposes, but he was dead serious in writing an emotionally probing work about religious hubris, institutional decadence, temptation, depravity, suffering, enlightenment, compassion, and healing, and if you "get" Parsifal you experience it as a journey of the soul. The music runs the gamut from the horrifying to the sublime, and reaches heights of beauty that put to flight all small-minded notions of spirituality as a monopoly of "the true religion" - which is part of the point of the work.

    Beyond these, I love Faure's serene lullaby of a requiem, Berlioz's stylized tapestry of one, and Brahms's comfort for life's vicissitudes. And many other things.

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