View Poll Results: Your Favorite(s) of Berio's Sequenze?

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  • Sequenza I (1958; rev. 1992) for flute

    0 0%
  • Sequenza II (1963) for harp

    0 0%
  • Sequenza III (1965) for female voice

    0 0%
  • Sequenza IV (1965) for piano

    0 0%
  • Sequenza V (1966) for trombone

    1 25.00%
  • Sequenza VI (1967) for viola

    0 0%
  • Sequenza VII (1969/2000) for oboe

    1 25.00%
  • Sequenza VIII (1976) for violin

    1 25.00%
  • Sequenza IX (1980) for clarinet

    1 25.00%
  • Sequenza X (1984) for trumpet and piano resonance

    1 25.00%
  • Sequenza XI (1987) for guitar

    2 50.00%
  • Sequenza XII (1995) for bassoon

    0 0%
  • Sequenza XIII (1995) for accordion

    1 25.00%
  • Sequenza XIV (2002) for cello

    1 25.00%
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Thread: Favorite(s) of Berio's Sequenze

  1. #1
    Senior Member Trout's Avatar
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    Default Favorite(s) of Berio's Sequenze

    As someone who is becoming more familiar with Berio's Sequenze, I'd be very appreciative if you could please tell me your favorite(s) as well as any other interesting information regarding history, techniques, recordings, or other comments.

    The Sequenze are 14 pieces for a different solo instrument (with Sequenza X having the trumpet playing into piano so the strings resonate) that Berio wrote throughout his career, from 1958 to 2002. From what I know, they're considered some of the most significant works of the last century as they pushed the boundaries of solo instrument writing. Most, if not all, of them have been added to the instrumental repertoire, much to the chagrin of many a musician because of their extreme technical difficulty! But they, by no means, come across as vapid, virtuosic showpieces. I personally find them on the whole to be wonderfully engaging with plenty of musical substance.

    I don't think I've heard them enough to give an informed opinion, but I'd really like to know yours!

    Here's a Youtube playlist of the Naxos performances: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...yuE0idskNu2MJv.

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  3. #2
    Senior Member tdc's Avatar
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    Good thread idea, I would also like to know more about these excellent works. At the moment Sequenza VIII is my favorite. It is a virtuosic and intense piece that was something Berio considered compositionally as a "personal debt" to the violin, it is also an homage to J.S. Bach's Chaconne for solo violin.

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  5. #3
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    Other than the guitar sequenza, I've only heard/seen the one for trombone. The one for guitar is fantastic, I tried to play it, but not live. It's one of the masterpieces of modern guitarmusic.

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  7. #4
    Senior Member Vaneyes's Avatar
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    FWIW guitarist Norbert Kraft is the producer and engineer of this album. I like 'em all, and it's surprisingly good cocktail party music.


    Last edited by Vaneyes; Dec-24-2016 at 02:02.

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  9. #5
    Senior Member starthrower's Avatar
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    I have the Naxos set, but I can't remember any of the pieces. Too much music, too little time.
    "When a man is treated like a beast, he says, 'After all, I'm human.' When he behaves like a beast, he says, 'After all, I'm only human.' " - Karl Kraus

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  11. #6
    Senior Member Retrograde Inversion's Avatar
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    I think VII for oboe might be the one that has made the most impression on me. It's quite easy to hear how its pitch structure is centered around a single middle note (B natural, from memory) and it also features a number of interesting timbral fingerings and some lovely soft multiphonics. I also very much like the freshness of I, and the added aspect of theatre in III and V, including the
    famous "why?" in the latter.

    I wish he'd written one for marimba, though.
    Last edited by Retrograde Inversion; Dec-24-2016 at 05:13.

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