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Thread: 21st Century Classical

  1. #16
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    Good idea to open a thread devoted to 21st century music, without the perennial debates on "atonality", "meaning of art", "4:33",...

    As a small first contribution to the thread, let me mention (an opera, what else?) a piece by the Spanish composer Héctor Parra, "Wilde", premiered just around one year ago at the Schwetzinger Festival. It's based on Händl Klaus's Wilde - Der Mann mit den traurigen Augen, with a libretto by the Austrian writer himself. And a staging by Calisto Bieito.


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  3. #17
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    The Living Composers Project - a nonprofit database, charting the lives and works of composers in the here and now
    This is a good database of contemporary composers, listed by surname and country.

    These are web sites I sometimes check for new music.
    Sequenza 21/ - The Contemporary Classical Music Community
    5:4 - "It's the most beautiful ugly sound in the world"
    Just outside - Brian Olewnick
    I CARE IF YOU LISTEN - New Classical Music News
    Second Inversion - Rethink Classical

  4. #18
    Senior Member Blancrocher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tortkis View Post
    [url=http://www.composers21.com]
    5:4 - "It's the most beautiful ugly sound in the world"
    Just thought I'd highlight Simon Cummings' end-of-year list of his favorite albums, which includes a lot of names that I don't think have ever been mentioned on the forum. There's a slant towards music with electronics and some stuff that could probably fairly be described as experimental pop:

    http://5against4.com/2016/12/30/best...f-2016-part-1/
    http://5against4.com/2016/12/31/best...f-2016-part-2/

    For anyone interested, here's his "mixed tape" with selections from each album:

    • Mitski – Fireworks (from Puberty 2)
    • Me and My Drummer – Lancelot (from Love is a Fridge)
    • Bear McCreary – Alone in the Cave (from The Forest (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack))
    • Olga Neuwirth – Torching (from Goodnight Mommy (Original Soundtrack))
    • Jenny Hval – The Great Undressing (from Blood Bitch)
    • Kroy – Days (from Scavenger)
    • Maïa Vidal – The Tide (from You’re the Waves)
    • Necro Deathmort – Moonstar (from The Capsule)
    • Wendy Bevan – Porcelain (from Rose and Thorn)
    • Oy – We We We We (from Space Diaspora)
    • James O’Callaghan – Empties-Impetus [excerpt] (from Espaces tautologiques)
    • Seth Parker Woods – Pierre Alexandre Tremblay: asinglewordisnotenough3 (invariant) [excerpt] (from asinglewordisnotenough)
    • Michael Moser – Antiphon-Stein: Side B [excerpt] (from Antiphon Stein)
    • Mark Korven – Caleb’s Death (from The Witch (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack))
    • Richard Barrett – life-form (anthesis) (from Music for cello and electronics)
    • Bent Sørensen – Lacrimosa (from Snowbells)
    • Zahn | Hatami | McClure – Vhandaan (from Veerian)
    • Clara Iannotta – Al di là del bianco (from A Failed Entertainment: Werke 2009–2014)
    • Robin Foster – The Last Stand (from Anthropoid (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack))
    • SPC ECO – Slow Down (from All We Have Is Now)
    • Fritz Hauser – Rundum [excerpt] (from Different Beat)
    • Matmos – Ultimate Care II [excerpt] (from Ultimate Care II)
    • Supersilent – 13.9 [excerpt] (from 13)
    • The Natural History Museum – Australopithecus (from Attenborough)
    • Ladyhawke – A Love Song (from Wild Things)
    • Cliff Martinez – Neon Demon (from The Neon Demon (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack))
    • Chaya Czernowin – At the Fringe of Our Gaze [excerpt] (from The Quiet: works for orchestra)
    • Claude Vivier – Première Partie: Air Du Baryton-Martin (from Kopernikus)
    • John Wall – Muta[*]-[*] (from Muta Variations)
    • Daniel Wohl – Holographic [excerpt] (from Holographic)
    • Jonty Harrison – Going / Places [excerpt] (from Voyages)
    • Stefan Fraunberger – Ereignishorizont [excerpt] (from Quellgeister #2 ‘Wurmloch’)
    • Francis Dhomont – La métamorphose (from Le cri du Choucas)
    • Three Trapped Tigers – Tekkers (from Silent Earthling)
    • Katie Gately – Sire (from Color)
    • Sleigh Bells – Throw Me Down The Stairs (from Jessica Rabbit)
    • C Duncan – Like You Do (from The Midnight Sun)
    • Christian Fennesz & Jim O’Rourke – Wouldn’t Wanna Be Swept Away [excerpt] (from It’s Hard For Me To Say I’m Sorry)
    • Autechre – c7b2 [excerpt] (from elseq 2)
    • Kayo Dot – Amalia’s Theme (from Plastic House on Base of Sky)
    Here also is a list of all his reviews, mostly of new works premiered at major festivals:

    http://5against4.com/list-of-contemp...eviewed-on-54/
    Last edited by Blancrocher; Jan-10-2017 at 13:56.

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  6. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by tortkis View Post
    [url=http://www.composers21.com]
    Just outside - Brian Olewnick
    And another year-end list:

    Favorite releases of 2016, allowing that I've heard far fewer this year than in years past. Thanks, as ever, to all the musicians and labels involved.

    Keith Rowe – The Room Extended (Erstwhile)
    75 Dollar Bill – Wood/Metal/Plastic/Pattern/Rhythm/Rock (Thin Wrist Recordings)
    Ryoko Akama – Acceptance (Suppedaneum)
    AMM – Spanish Fighters (Matchless)
    Casey Anderson - Radios (A Wave Press)
    Marc Baron – Un Salon Au Fond d’Un Lac (Potlatch)
    Pascal Battus – Dafne Vicente-Sandoval – s/t (Potlatch)
    Olivia Block – Dissolution (Glistening Examples)
    Dante Boon – For Clarinet and Piano (Another Timbre)
    Anthony Burr/Anthony Pateras – The Long Exhale (Immediata)
    Lucio Capece – Awareness About (Another Timbre)
    Scott Cazan – Ingress (A Wave Press)
    D’Incise/Cristían Alvear – Appalachian Anatolia (Another Timbre)
    Angharad Davies/Rhodri Davies/Michael Duch/Lina Lapelyte/John Lely/John Tilbury – Goldsmiths (Another Timbre)
    Angharad Davies/Tisha Mukarji – Ffansïon (Another Timbre)
    Bryan Eubanks/Hong Chulki – Proper Motions (Celadon)
    Morgan Evans-Weiler – Endless Overtones in Relational Space (Suppedaneum)
    Morton Feldman/The Smith Quartet/John Tilbury – Music for Piano and Strings, Volume 3 (Matchless)
    Jürg Frey/Quotuor Bozzini – String Quartet No. 3/Unhöbare Zeit (Edition Wandelweiser)
    Jürg Frey/Cristían Alvear – Guitarist, Alone (Another Timbre/Cathnor)
    Jean-Luc Guionnet /Dedalus – Distances Ouïes Dites (Potlatch)
    Sarah Hennies/Cristían Alvear – Orienting Response (mappa)
    Illogical Harmonies – Volume (Another Timbre)
    A.F. Jones – Languor Yields (Rhizome.s)
    Beat Keller/Tom Johnson/Joseph Kudirka – String Trios (Edition Wandelweiser)
    Graham Lambkin – Community (ErstSolo)
    Lance Austin Olsen – Maps, Battle Hymns: The Vast Field of Liberation (Suppedaneum)
    Michael Pisaro/Cristían Alvear/d’Incise/Lo Wie/Angharad Davies/Manfred Werder – 3+3=3 (Melange Edition)
    Michael Pisaro/Radu Malfatti – Invisible Landscapes (Willow St. Recordings)
    Michael Pisaro/Reinier Van Houdt – The Earth and the Sky (ErstClass)
    Michael Pisaro/Christian Wolff - Looking around (Erstwhile)
    Matthew Revert/Vanessa Rossetto – Earnest Rubbish (Erstwhile)
    Keith Rowe/Martin Küchen – The Bakery (Mikroton)
    Marcus Schmickler/John Tilbury – Timekeepers (A-Musik)
    Linda Caitlin Smith – Dirt Road (Another Timbre)
    Linda Caitlin Smith/Eve Ehoyan – Thought and Desire (Maria de Alvear World Edition)
    Suidobashi Chamber Ensemble – s/t (Meenna)
    Marvin Tate/Joseph Clayton Mills – The Process (Every Contact Leaves a Trace)
    Toshiya Tsunoda – Somashikiba (edition.t)
    Taku Unami/Devin DiSanto – s/t (ErstLive)

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  8. #20
    Senior Member Barelytenor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael42 View Post
    Hi, new here but I'll make it up to you

    I don't know a lot of living music but I found this on a Facebook page last night:



    I think it's interesting to say the least, the composer has a unique conception of structure
    I think it's interesting is to say the most. It just sounds like a lot of plinking and plucking. On the plus side, I did made it through a minute and a half of it. Which brings up a philosophical question: I wonder if folks who are, ahem, older like I am are less open to listening to 21st century music. After all, one could argue that we, on average, do have less time remaining to listen to "music." (Sorry for the quotes, that's snarky of me, even I get that. But there it is.) I decided the remaining six minutes of this piece were better served elsewhere.

    I remember when I was younger, I used to adore listening to Cathy Berberian singing Luciano Berio. Darn, crossed that century boundary again. Partial recompense: I think Penderecki's Threnody for the Victims of Hiroshima is a stunning piece. He's still alive, right?



    Kind regards,

    George

  9. #21
    Senior Member Janspe's Avatar
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    One piece that absolutely pierces my heart is Gubaidulina's violin concerto from 2007, called In tempus praesens. I easily rank the piece among my favourite violin concertos of all time!


  10. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Janspe View Post
    One piece that absolutely pierces my heart is Gubaidulina's violin concerto from 2007, called In tempus praesens. I easily rank the piece among my favourite violin concertos of all time!
    Agreed!!!!--I can't get enough of that work.

    Btw, I've recently been sampling a recording on Naxos that includes Fachwerk (2009) and Silenzio (1991), which I think I will be acquiring:

    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...1Z_Be6xwMam-1u
    Last edited by Blancrocher; Jan-11-2017 at 23:37.

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  12. #23
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    Neos has not been releasing albums for digital download until recently, but I found today that some recent recordings have become available at amazon download store and google play (cheaper). Still many albums are missing (Donaueschinger 2012~2014, Hába, etc.) but this is a good news to me. I downloaded Donaueschinger Musiktage 2015 and musica viva vol. 23 (Lachenmann).

    Donaueschinger Musiktage 2015

    Georg Friedrich Haas (*1953): Oktett für 8 Posaunen (2015)
    Johannes Boris Borowski (*1979): Sérac for orchestra (2014 / 2015)
    Stefan Prins (*1979): Mirror Box Extensions for ensemble, live electronics & live video (2014 / 2015)
    Mark Andre (*1964): „über“ for clarinet, orchestra and live electronics (2015)
    Francesco Filidei (*1973): Killing Bach for orchestra (2015)
    Yoav Pasovsky (*1980): Pulsus alternans for orchestra (2015)

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  14. #24
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    It's a general chamber music site, not specifically 21st-century oriented, but I like keeping an eye on Earsense:

    http://earsense.org/

    There are regular updates of new videos uploaded to Youtube (including really rare and some new stuff). You can search for composers by year, genre, etc. And it's got a handy list of composer anniversaries for those who want to make a composer-birthday post in Current Listening. Just another site to browse and maybe bookmark for anyone interested.

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    Senior Member 20centrfuge's Avatar
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    I so appreciate this thread. I think an ongoing discussion of today's music is so important. I believe music of this century is as different from the music of the 20th century as the 20th is different from the 19th century.

    Here are some questions I propose for discussion:

    1. When you are sifting through new music, what is it that you are hoping to hear? Of all that is being composed nowadays, musically speaking, what is it that is enjoyable to you?

    2. What role do you feel melody has amongst contemporary composers?

    3. What are your views about the integration of technology in the composition and the performance of new works?

    4. Does contemporary music have problems connecting with audiences? Is that relevant? What do you feel can or should be done about that?

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    I see 21st century music as having branches. One branch of the current music tree is COMPLEXITY (Ades, Lindberg, Maxwell Davies, Carter, Ferneyhough, etc) . There is a lot of music being written now that is a lot to take in. It takes more work from the listener to come to terms with this music.

    Another branch is SIMPLICITY. This seems like a reaction to the complexity trend. Some minimalism seems to fall into this category (Reich). Some of the recent choral music falls in here (I'm thinking of Wolfe's Anthracite Fields, for example)

    I don't mean either of these labels as negative. I actually enjoy a lot of very complex music and a lot of relatively simpler music as well.

    I hate to say it but I also feel there are a lot of GIMMICKY composers right now. I won't name names cuz I don't really want to fight about it, but I think some composers, in an effort to be different, resort to silly techniques.

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    Senior Member 20centrfuge's Avatar
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    Here are some of the works that have been written since Y2K that I have enjoyed:

    Michel van der Aa: Up Close, Concerto for Cello, Orchestra, Film
    Unsuk Chin: Violin Concerto
    George Tstontakis: Violin Concerto, No. 2
    Han Abrahamsen: Let Me Tell You
    Poul Ruders: Symphony No. 4 (2008)
    Tristan Murail: Winter Fragments
    John Adams: My Father Knew Charles Ives
    Gubaidulina: In Tempus Praesens
    Dutilleaux: Correspondances

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  20. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by 20centrfuge View Post
    I see 21st century music as having branches. One branch of the current music tree is COMPLEXITY (Ades, Lindberg, Maxwell Davies, Carter, Ferneyhough, etc) . There is a lot of music being written now that is a lot to take in. It takes more work from the listener to come to terms with this music.

    Another branch is SIMPLICITY. This seems like a reaction to the complexity trend. Some minimalism seems to fall into this category (Reich). Some of the recent choral music falls in here (I'm thinking of Wolfe's Anthracite Fields, for example)

    I don't mean either of these labels as negative. I actually enjoy a lot of very complex music and a lot of relatively simpler music as well.

    I hate to say it but I also feel there are a lot of GIMMICKY composers right now. I won't name names cuz I don't really want to fight about it, but I think some composers, in an effort to be different, resort to silly techniques.
    So-called complexity music sometimes sounds simple when it is monotonously complex.

    There are not so many composers whose works are literally simple. I don't think the works of Reich and Wolfe are so simple. The only true simplicity composer I can think of might be Tom Johnson.

    An aleatoric music or process music could be described in a simple instruction, but it does not mean that the result is necessarily simple. (piano phase, in C, Cage's etudes, ...)

    La Monte Young said that his music may sound simple but it is actually very complex.

    A piece of music that sounds simple in one aspect (for example, rhythmically static) might reveal the complexity of another aspect (harmony of subtle overtones, variety of timbre, gradual changes of multiple sound layers, ...)

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    Senior Member 20centrfuge's Avatar
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    Good points.

    I'm thinking of complexity and simplicity in terms of the relative demands on the listener. Reich may be complex in terms of number of parts or performance demands but is easy to listen to compared with someone like Carter

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    Was checking out winners of the Grawemeyer award. It's a winner

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