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Thread: Most tempestuous perpetual motions (de facto or titular)

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    Default Most tempestuous perpetual motions (de facto or titular)

    What pieces titled perpetual motion do you find the most tempestuous?
    What pieces not titled perpetual motion do you consider practically perpetual motions and the most tempestuous?

    For me-

    Chopin
    Etudes Op.25 No.12
    Preludes Op.28 No.8 &16

    Rachmaninoff
    Moments musicaux, Op.16, No.4

    Sinding
    Suite, Op.10, Mvt.1

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    Alkan: Étude Op. 76/3
    Étude, Op. 39/7
    Sorabji: Piano Sonata No. 5 - II, opening section (pp.63-74 in the Abercrombie edition)
    Symphonic Variations for piano solo - Var. 56 (based around the finale of Chopin's Piano Sonata No. 2, Op. 35)
    ???: Piano Sonata No. 5 - IV, section marked Alkanique...

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    How about:

    Barber Violin Concerto, movement 3

    Beethoven Piano Sonata 22, movement 2

    Prokofiev Piano Sonata 7, final movement
    When you don't know what you're saying, you take a long time to say it. When you know what you're saying, you get pithy.

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    Schumann's Toccata. When played at Schumann's indicated tempo, it becomes an exciting whirlwind of notes. Many pianists (Argerich, Kissin, Richter) play it too slowly--it should sound frantic, not meditative! Here's a nice fast rendition by Horowitz:


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    Rachmaninov : Moments musicaux, Op.16, No.4 , without a blink.
    First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.
    "Mahatma Gandhi"

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    Was going to suggest Prokofiev's 7th Sonata, but HP beat me to it. -

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    Many contemporary works might fit the bill, but one that immediately comes to mind is Berio's Points on the curve to find... .


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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkW View Post
    Was going to suggest Prokofiev's 7th Sonata, but HP beat me to it. -
    That happens to me all the time. Tough competition on TC!!!
    When you don't know what you're saying, you take a long time to say it. When you know what you're saying, you get pithy.

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    I'm not entirely sure what the OP means but here are some stormy piano pieces, the first all have something to do with actual storms in either the title or intent:

    Lyapunov - Transcendental Etude No. 6 ("The Storm")
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LeKQ7c91wGQ
    Henselt - Etude Op. 2 No. 1 ("Storm, you cannot beat me!")
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ShAHwnCMfqI
    Chopin - Prelude Op. 28 No. 24 ("The Storm")
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=71oCexIXk9Q
    Chopin - Etude Op. 25 No. 11 ("Winter Wind")!!
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hnWo8PxrOR4
    Liszt - Orage (Storm)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OcBIRZ7utwI
    Scriabin - Sonata No. 2 movement 2 ("The second movement represents the vast expanse of ocean in stormy agitation")
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=weXvYaR_eWM (starts at 8:30)

    Some more favorite tempestuous solo piano pieces:

    Scriabin - Etude Op. 42 No. 5 (my favorite of them all, only Horowitz)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UIP1YoPAeyM
    Scriabin - Prelude Op. 11 No. 14
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZEsHv3SOLFc
    Scriabin - Prelude Op. 11 No. 24 (I can play this one myself)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5OHBP3iS4D0
    Prokofiev - Etude Op. 2 No. 1
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bp8twJxAsaU
    Prokofiev - Etude Op. 2 No. 4
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WzbjTT-LzZc
    Prokofiev - Toccata Op. 11
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XYFpfFsbshk
    Rachmaninoff - Moment Musical Op. 16 No. 4 (already mentioned but here's a great performance)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WhLDse5R8dQ
    Rachmaninoff - Prelude Op. 23 No. 2 (only Richter!)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RICGqS2UtmU
    Rachmaninoff - Etude Op. 39 No. 5 (Horowitz' completely neurotic performance)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yIM0FM0cHb8
    Rachmaninoff - Etude Op. 39 No. 6 (the only piano piece Lisitsa is best at)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RFMNhx2-VDE
    Ravel - Toccata from Le Tombeau de Couperin
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UORxpTn-pOE
    Last edited by DeepR; Jan-11-2017 at 17:38.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DeepR View Post
    Scriabin - Etude Op. 42 No. 5
    Greatest etude ever written. Compare the idiomatic writing of the Etude with the idiomatic writing of Liszt's Auf dem wasser zu singen, see the inspiration and transformation.

    Quote Originally Posted by DeepR View Post
    I'm not entirely sure what the OP means
    Neither am I the definition of perpetuum mobile is vague.. the marking of Scriabin's Op. 42-5, affannato ("breathless"), might be a good one.

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    You haven't specified that you are only after piano music, so here are some orchestral suggestions not yet mentioned:

    Adams - A Short Ride in a Fast Machine
    Ibert - Bacchanale
    Mendelssohn - Last movement (Saltarello) from the Italian Symphony
    Pärt - Perpetuum mobile
    Prokofoev - 2nd movement (Scherzo) of Piano Concerto No 2
    Rimsky-Korsakov - The Flight of the Bumble Bee from The Tale of Tsar Saltan
    Shostakovich - 3rd movement of Symphony No 8; 2nd movement of Symphony No 10
    Johann Strauss II - Perpetuum mobile

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    Quote Originally Posted by Delicious Manager View Post
    You haven't specified that you are only after piano music, so here are some orchestral suggestions not yet mentioned:

    Adams - A Short Ride in a Fast Machine
    Ibert - Bacchanale
    Mendelssohn - Last movement (Saltarello) from the Italian Symphony
    Pärt - Perpetuum mobile
    Prokofoev - 2nd movement (Scherzo) of Piano Concerto No 2
    Rimsky-Korsakov - The Flight of the Bumble Bee from The Tale of Tsar Saltan
    Shostakovich - 3rd movement of Symphony No 8; 2nd movement of Symphony No 10
    Johann Strauss II - Perpetuum mobile
    Since you mention Dmitry Dmitreyevich, what about that hair-raising string toccata in the first movement of his Fourth Symphony?

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    Ravel: Violin Sonata No. 2, finale.

    Bartok: Concerto for Orchestra, finale.

    Barber: Violin Concerto, finale.

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    Then there's the final movement of Barber's Piano Concerto in which he unsuccessfully attempts to capture the brilliance of the final movement of his Violin Concerto.

    Just writing fast music doesn't make it great.
    Last edited by hpowders; Jan-13-2017 at 00:15.
    When you don't know what you're saying, you take a long time to say it. When you know what you're saying, you get pithy.

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