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Thread: Beethoven late sonatas-- Your favorite interpreters

  1. #61
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    I thought that as a set, the Pollini is very, very good. Individually it's a bit different

    28 Hungerford (great to see others mention this great Aussie pianist)
    29 Sokolov - Moscow recording from about 20-30 years ago, it's coupled with the Schumann PC
    30 Hess - simply incomparable
    31 Richter - in Leipzig
    32 Arrau - on a EMI Classic Archive DVD (rec 1970)

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  3. #62
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    Annie Fischer's Op. 106 is fierce and revelatory, though I think her dynamics in the 3rd movement to be 'pushed' too much. Brendel's 1971 recording is the first I ever heard, so maybe that accounts for it, but I just think he owns this sonata and plays the 3rd movement with a tenderness that owes something to his restraint. I also like Claude Frank's version and also Ronald Brautigam's on Fortepiano. Nevertheless, Annie Fischer's complete set of the 32 are on my Christmas list and am thankful for the many great posts on this thread.

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  5. #63
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    Either Annie Fischer or Bruce Hungerford. Both are very fine.

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  7. #64
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    “Mahler suddenly took his arm and, pointing down to the river they were passing with his other hand, exclaimed, ‘Just look, doctor, look!’ ‘What is it?’ Brahms asked. ‘Don't you see, there goes the last wave!’ It was a good symbol for the eternal movement of life and art, which knows of no cessation. But I seem to remember that it was Brahms who had the last word, thus: ‘That is all very fine, but perhaps what matters most is whether the wave goes out to sea or into a swamp.’” — Richard Specht

  8. #65
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    No.31: Simon Barere
    No.32, Mvt.1: Dino Ciani, Sari Biro
    No.32, Mvt.2: if memory serves, Anton Rubinstein commented on whether it is humanly possible to excel in both movements and whether the 2nd movement transcends humanity. All recordings I've heard prove his point - which might not be applicable to superhumans like Josef Hofmann and Simon Barere (but I can only imagine since they left no recordings of Op.111).

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