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Thread: Neglected German and Austrian orchestral composers and works of the late romantic era

  1. #91
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    The earlier scorn of musicologists certainly helped seal Raff's fate, but now it's something more insidious: the sheer laziness of conductors. They all have to have their say on the holy canon of the standard rep. Every new baton wielder has to put his (or her) stamp on Beethoven, Mahler, Tchaikovsky, Dvorak et al. Too busy or lazy to explore the off beat repertoire. Well, at least there are some who are curious, but not enough!

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  3. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by mbhaub View Post
    The earlier scorn of musicologists certainly helped seal Raff's fate, but now it's something more insidious: the sheer laziness of conductors. They all have to have their say on the holy canon of the standard rep. Every new baton wielder has to put his (or her) stamp on Beethoven, Mahler, Tchaikovsky, Dvorak et al. Too busy or lazy to explore the off beat repertoire. Well, at least there are some who are curious, but not enough!
    Yes, I agree, it is the current standard rep orientation of conductors.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rw181383 View Post
    If I may add another composer, the Austrian Ludwig Thuille (mainly known for his Sextet), wrote one symphony and a piano concerto.
    In his youth Ludwig Thuille (1861-1907) was a friend of Richard Strauss, who later premiered one of Thuille's work's. Composer also of 3 operas, chamber music, song cycles, and choral music, Thuille was a noted teacher at the Munich Hochschuele, where his composition students included Richard Wetz, Ernest Bloch, and Walter Braunfels.

    I, for one, will be supportive of any comments (almost!) on his symphony!

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  6. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eramire156 View Post
    Readers of this thread might be interested in the following site: Unsung composershttp://www.unsungcomposers.com/forum/index.php
    Thank you for this link. From one of the posts on it I turned to BBC Magazine, September, 2017, p. 62 where among the CD's suggested for exploration after hearing Schubert's Symphony No. 9 (Great C Major) are:

    Max Bruch: Symphony No. 1, London Symphony/Hickox, Chandos CHAN 9784
    Joachim Raff: Symphony No. 2, Orchestre de la Suiss Romande/Jarvi, Chandos CHSA 5117
    Robert Fuchs: Symphony No. 1, WDR Symphony Cologne/Steffens, CPO 7778302

    Some serious recordings of the composers we're discussing!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Eramire156 View Post
    I can't decide if I like von Reznicek or not, currently listening to his dance symphony, his ironic symphony did make me smile, I won't dismiss him out hand and give another listen.
    rw181383 & Eramire 156 -- Here are some speculations -- I could be wrong -- upon listening to Emil von Reznicek's Dance Symphony (No. 5). As I mentioned in yesterday's post about Raff's Symphony No. 5, in a program symphony the inter-relation of the program and the symphony structure is fascinating -- much more than one simply matching the other. I like the work -- Reznicek is a natural composer and sophisticated orchestrator with a mordant/loopy sense of humour:

    1. Polonaise -- the first dance at a ball, and kind of macho, so its position in the symphony as first movement is fitting
    2. Czardas -- Hungarian dance that has a slow opening (lassu) and fast ending (friss) plus other tempo changes. The solo violinist is typically showy . . . In this movement the fast parts seem comically shortened -- because it's the slow movement of a symphony!
    3. Laendler -- rustic Austrian dance and precursor of the waltz; but this is a sophisticated waltz with zero rusticity IMO.
    4. Tarantella -- Well, Mendelsson's Italian Symphony ends with a tarantella, but this one is over-the-top. The middle section sounds like music from a filme noir -- perhaps a parody?
    Last edited by Roger Knox; Oct-19-2017 at 23:59. Reason: grammar

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