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Thread: Prefer Keyboard to Piano

  1. #16
    Senior Member eugeneonagain's Avatar
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    About ten years ago I sold a lovely old Gors & Kallmann piano which was both marvellous and horrible. The action and the balance of the hammers was beautiful, also the sound, but before I had it someone had not taken care of it properly. The tuner told me the frame wouldn't take the tension required to properly tune it and as a result it was a semitone out.

    The cost of rectifying this was more than I could afford, so I sold it to a renovation workshop.

    The cost of having a piano is more than just the initial cost; there's the costly maintenance. Moving house is a nightmare , it means specialist removal and retuning. Playing a digital has its drawbacks for me, but many benefits. I can link to the computer and play my almost perfect Rhodes piano sound or a Wurlitzer.

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  3. #17
    Senior Member Captainnumber36's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eugeneonagain View Post
    About ten years ago I sold a lovely old Gors & Kallmann piano which was both marvellous and horrible. The action and the balance of the hammers was beautiful, also the sound, but before I had it someone had not taken care of it properly. The tuner told me the frame wouldn't take the tension required to properly tune it and as a result it was a semitone out.

    The cost of rectifying this was more than I could afford, so I sold it to a renovation workshop.

    The cost of having a piano is more than just the initial cost; there's the costly maintenance. Moving house is a nightmare , it means specialist removal and retuning. Playing a digital has its drawbacks for me, but many benefits. I can link to the computer and play my almost perfect Rhodes piano sound or a Wurlitzer.
    I had my piano moved by a bunch of college kids that did moving on the side while pursuing their music band. They did a great job!

    But I definitely hear you, having a digital piano does make a lot of things cheaper and easier!

  4. #18
    Member Potiphera's Avatar
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    I'm trying to sell my Yamaha digital keyboard , model. E433. 61 keys. I purchased when I first considered taking piano lessons. Now I don't need it and want to make space in my room.

    Looks like this =. https://www.amazon.co.uk/Yamaha-PSRE.../dp/B00JAEDIP6
    Last edited by Potiphera; Dec-17-2017 at 16:24.

  5. #19
    Senior Member brianvds's Avatar
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    I don't own a "real" piano so I have to make do with my electric piano, an ancient Clavinova dating from the 1980s. Rather tinny sound, but I have grown used to it over the years. I like the fact that I can set the volume so as not to bother the neighbors, and with the press of a button can switch from tinny piano sound to tinny harpsichord. :-)

    Its action is rather lighter than that of a mechanical piano. And its sound perhaps more akin to a fortepiano than a modern instrument, so I find it is more suitable for Baroque and Classical era pieces than anything heavy.

    Nowadays this doesn't bother me, because due to lack of time I cannot tackle difficult pieces anyway. I have decided to focus exclusively on pieces not above grade 4 level or so, so that I can learn to play them reasonably cleanly, rather than making a noisy mess of more difficult ones.

    So on the whole, this humble little instrument works for me. Buying anything else is in any event not an option at the moment.
    Last edited by brianvds; Jan-09-2018 at 19:18.

  6. #20
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    I love keyboard because of it a perfect instrument by we can feel harmonium and piano both in it.

  7. #21
    Senior Member Kontrapunctus's Avatar
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    I have to say that I like the purity of my Yamaha P115--it's always in tune and sounds pretty good through headphones. The touch is lighter, and the pedal leaves something to be desired, but from a purely sonic standpoint I daresay it might sound a little better/clearer than my Yamaha B3. Still, the tactile sensation of an acoustic piano is hard to beat.
    “Critics are like eunuchs in a harem; they know how it's done, they've seen it done every day, but they're unable to do it themselves.” ― Brendan Behan

  8. #22
    Member philoctetes's Avatar
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    Pianos all sound like pianos, a keyboard needs to sound like an organ too, or harpsichord, etc...

  9. #23
    Senior Member Victor Redseal's Avatar
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    I use a Roland U20 which is old but still works. It has about 2 dozen different pianos in it plus a bunch of harpsichords including muted. It has hammond organs, harmoniums, pipe organs, celestes, string sections, harps, horn sections, reed and wind sections, choirs--you name it. These are all sampled so the sound is absolutely real. Plus it has drums, timpani, gongs, cymbals, solo trumpets, saxes, violins, trombone, tube, flute, clarinet and all kinds of sound FX and synthesizer FX. Plus each sound is fully programmable and you change the ADSR envelopes anyway you want to. The keys are weighted like a real piano. I can create any soundscapes I want. Every sound is stereo. I can make entire orchestras or small string ensembles or jazz combos or rock bands--anything I want. I run it into a computer and use cakewalk and sonar software to make compositions. Plus you can download all kinds of new sounds so it's pretty much the sky's the limit. It's MIDI, of course. If you're going to go electric, may as well get a multi-timbral synth or sample player and have fun. Be careful, I've spent entire days working on pieces and refusing to stop until I was finished. The reward is hearing the result.
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  10. #24
    Senior Member Phil loves classical's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carol Rein View Post
    You mean digital pianos or software pianos?
    I mean digital pianos, but it also applies to software pianos. Acoustic pianos can achieve way more nuance and depth than any digital piano I’ve tried.
    "Forgive me, Majesty. I'm a vulgar man. But I assure you, my music is not.“ Mozart

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