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Thread: Your Favorite Piano Quintets

  1. #31
    Senior Member Kontrapunctus's Avatar
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    Brahms, Franck, Reger, Bloch No.1, Shostakovich, and Schnittke immediately come to mind.

  2. #32
    Senior Member Xaltotun's Avatar
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    Brahms and Franck to me.
    Music is not the sounds you hear

    Music is not the notes you see

  3. #33
    Senior Member Prodromides's Avatar
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    My No.1 favorite (and most frequently listened to) Quintette is by Charles Koechlin.
    Koechlin's musical journeys from darkness into light is best represented by his Quintette Opus 80 (1921).

    Other favorites of mine:

    Ernest Bloch's Piano Quintet No.1 (1923)
    George Enescu's Quintet
    Meyer Kupferman's Quintet for Piano & Strings


    [I have a couple of favorites which are quintets with bassoon & strings, as well ... and let's not forget Wind Quintets, too )
    TresPicos and JakeBloch like this.

  4. #34
    Senior Member TresPicos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prodromides View Post
    My No.1 favorite (and most frequently listened to) Quintette is by Charles Koechlin.
    Koechlin's musical journeys from darkness into light is best represented by his Quintette Opus 80 (1921).
    I like Koechlin - obviously... - but I hadn't heard his piano quintet yet. Amazing stuff!

    Thanks a million for that listening tip!

  5. #35
    Senior Member Prodromides's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TresPicos View Post
    I like Koechlin - obviously... - but I hadn't heard his piano quintet yet. Amazing stuff!

    Thanks a million for that listening tip!
    You are welcome, TresPicos.

    I was initially introduced to Koechlin's Quintets via the 1989 French Cybelia album, which I acquired around 1994:



    This recording is superb, but nonethelss out-of-print.

    http://www.muziekweb.nl/Link/CJX0649

    If interested, a more recent version of this '21 Quintette has appeared on this "Ar Re-se" label in 2010:



    http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/...lbum_id=282910

    Hope you have many hours of bliss listening to Koechlin!

    [I'm thinking about creating a thread in the Guestbook section on Charles Koechlin (since he hasn't even had a thread of his own over there!). Could we be the only 2 persons @ TC who love the music of Koechlin?]
    Last edited by Prodromides; Apr-26-2012 at 05:28.

  6. #36
    Senior Member ComposerOfAvantGarde's Avatar
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    Mozart: Quintet for Piano and Winds
    Adès: Piano Quintet
    ComposerOfAvantGarde: Piano Quintet
    Last edited by ComposerOfAvantGarde; Apr-26-2012 at 06:25.
    It's the greed of huge companies and huge organizations which control life in a kind of a brutal way ... It's gotten worse and worse, somehow, because physical science has given us more and more terrible deadly weapons, and the human spirit has been destroyed in so many cases, so what's the use of having the most powerful country in the world if we have killed the soul.
    ~Hovhaness

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    Senior Member Cnote11's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ComposerOfAvantGarde View Post
    Mozart: Quintet for Piano and Winds
    Adès: Piano Quintet
    ComposerOfAvantGarde: Piano Quintet
    First two are okay, but kind of amateurish. The last one is genius though.

  8. #38
    Senior Member ComposerOfAvantGarde's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cnote11 View Post
    First two are okay, but kind of amateurish. The last one is genius though.
    Thank you so very much. I agree.
    It's the greed of huge companies and huge organizations which control life in a kind of a brutal way ... It's gotten worse and worse, somehow, because physical science has given us more and more terrible deadly weapons, and the human spirit has been destroyed in so many cases, so what's the use of having the most powerful country in the world if we have killed the soul.
    ~Hovhaness

  9. #39
    Senior Member kv466's Avatar
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    Could we be the only 2 persons @ TC who love the music of Koechlin?


    No,...but not everyone considers him their favorite, either. I've heard his stuff for over twenty years and while the chamber is particularly pleasant, I couldn't honestly place it above all other composers already mentioned.

  10. #40
    Senior Member LordBlackudder's Avatar
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    I have only heard the 1st Quartet, but it is a beautiful little work.

  12. #42
    Senior Member Hausmusik's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sid James View Post
    Brahms (forget which one) - the Hungarian ending is the most memorable aspect to this marvellous music...
    Sid, I believe you are thinking of the first piano quartet of Brahms, not the quintet.

    I am sort of fascinated by the piano quintet because of its interesting history. (Here I am cribbing from the Wikipedia article on the piano quintet, which I mainly wrote myself.)

    Before Schumann, the combination of piano and string quartet was used mainly for reductions of piano concerti. Robert Schumann effectively "invented" the Romantic genre of chamber music written expressly for the combination of piano and string quartet in 1842. Taking advantage of technological advances in the manufacture of the pianoforte that expanded its power and volume, and combining it with the by-then-hallowed genre of the string quartet, Schumann created a work of extraordinary intensity that alternates between conversational passages among the five instruments and more concertante style that pits piano against the massed power of the strings.

    Interestingly, the piano quintet seems to have "taken off" as chamber music moved out of the drawing room and into the concert hall.

    The finest quintets for piano and string quartet are probably those by Schumann, Brahms and Dvorak. The first two are paired on a cheap Naxos recording that I think is a library cornerstone.

    Last edited by Hausmusik; May-14-2012 at 01:46.

  13. #43
    Senior Member stomanek's Avatar
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    Has to be Schuman's great work - in fact the only chamber piece by him that I like.
    Schubert's trout is great - so are the Brahms.
    And Mozart's work for 4 winds and piano is fantastic.

  14. #44
    Senior Member Klavierspieler's Avatar
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    Schumann, of course. Also Dvorak. I need to listen to Bartok.
    Beautiful music reflects a beautiful Savior.

  15. #45
    Senior Member Hausmusik's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by poconoron View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by ScipioAfricanus
    Robert Schumann practically invented the Piano Quintet. Thuille's work in E flat is a late Romantic work in a Brahmsian mode.

    He did????


    Attachment 3838
    Yes, ScipioAfricanus is quite correct. The piano quintet as we know it--piano and string quartet--Schumann practically invented. After his quintet appeared in 1842--and made a huge sensation--the genre began to attract other first-rank composers and other major works began to be written for this combination of instruments. Earlier works for piano and four other instruments were generally written for different combinations (piano and winds, or piano quartet + bass) the major exception being Boccherini. This is covered in numerous books on the history of chamber music.
    Last edited by Hausmusik; Jun-05-2012 at 19:58.

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