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Thread: Your Favorite Piano Quintets

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    LvB
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    Default Your Favorite Piano Quintets

    Having mentioned Vierne's unfairly ignored piano quintet in Andruini's thread on Vierne, I thought it might be interesting to see what piano quintets people here particularly enjoy. (By piano quintet I mean pieces for piano and string quartet, not pieces for five pianos ). The ensemble, largely invented by Luigi Boccherini, who composed a dozen of them (way more than any other composer known to me), seems to invite composers to make especially grand gestures, allowing both the conversational feel of the string quartet and the expansive emotionality of much larger works.

    My list:

    1) Anton Rubinstein, Op. 99, g minor
    2) Johannes Brahms, Op. 34, f minor
    3) Louis Vierne, Op. 42, c minor
    4) Edward Elgar, Op. 84, a minor
    5) Antonin Dvorak, Op. 81, A Major (whew! At last a major key quintet)
    6) Dmitri Shostakovitch, Op. 57, g minor
    7) Cesar Franck, f minor

    8) Franz Schubert, Op. 114, 'Trout,' A Major (with a double bass in lieu of a second violin)

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    Senior Member andruini's Avatar
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    Great idea.. The Piano Quintet is a format I've always found fascinating.. Not only because of the possibilities it offers, but also for the intense musicianship it takes to assemble it correctly..
    I haven't heard Vierne's but you peaked my interest!

    1) Dvorak A Major, Op. 81
    2) Schubert Trout Quintet, Op. 114
    3) Brahms F minor, Op. 34
    4) Borodin C minor
    5) Martinu No. 2
    6) Shostakovich G minor, Op. 57

    that's all i can get off the top of my head.. I've yet to hear the Rubinstein, Elgar, Franck, Fauré(s), Sibelius, etc. etc.

    kind of irrelevant, but isn't this kind of funny/cool??
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BorYwGi2SJc

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    I cannot believe I have never listened to the Dvorak piano quintet until yesterday! I recognized most of the melodies, even though I had no idea they were from this quintet... has it been used frequently in other media?

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    After hearing it for the first time, I felt that I had to put in a good word for Taneyev's g minor quintet. Beautiful chamber music, just like everything else I've heard by Taneyev so far.
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    Senior Member Lisztfreak's Avatar
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    1. Elgar's (I think this one is my absolute favourite)
    2. Fauré's 1st
    3. Dora Pejacevic's
    4. Schumann's
    5. Fauré's 2nd

    I don't like Shostakovich's very much. And I haven't heard many more piano quintets.
    ''Oh, the String Quartet - oh, the Divine Scratching!''

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    I'm listening to Arensky's piano quintet in D major right now and it's really great. Well I enjoy Arensky's music, so no surprise there.

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    Senior Member joen_cph's Avatar
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    Concerning piano & strings, others include:

    - Gubajdulina
    - Martucci
    - Alfonso Rendano
    - Kokkonen
    - H.D.Koppel
    - Bartok
    - Peiko
    - Schnittke
    - P.A. Heise
    - Sibelius
    - Respighi
    - Reynaldo Hahn
    - Atterberg (based on his 6th Symphony)
    - Boris Tchaikovsky
    - Henze
    - Mendelssohn (as far as I remember)
    - Rochberg
    - Bloch

    Should I choose one, the Schnittke is of course the most different from the above-mentioned quintets - and a moving and profound one, like the somewhat Beethovenian Rochberg, very spectacular though sometimes a bit static. I don´t remember the Henze. I have a special fondness of the Franck (with Bernathova or Richter), the Faures and the Shostakovich, Schumann and Brahms quintets. Haven´t heard any of the Martinus, worth investigating, given - for example - his spectacular 2nd Cello Sonata.
    As regards the lesser-known italian quintets, the Martucci is a very good work, whereas the Rendano and Respighi are less memorable.
    Last edited by joen_cph; Apr-29-2010 at 22:21.

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    If "trout" instrumentation is OK, I like Farrenc's first.

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    Senior Member Weston's Avatar
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    I don't have that many piano quintets in my collection (or in memory).

    I have two versions of the "Trout," one of them is an aging computer software disc that has annotations scroll by as it is playing -- very informative.

    Vincent d'Indy has a dandy piano quintet in G minor I enjoy.

    I also have a piano quintet by Arthur Foote, one by Mozart, and one by Franz Reizenstein. I can't honestly say I remember anything about them.

    Lastly I have piano quintet by Peter Schikele that is quite playful, not surprisingly, but I found the string quartets on the same album more memorable.

    To say any of these are my favorites might be a stretch. They are favorites only because they are in my collection.

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    Senior Member Sid James's Avatar
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    I too am no expert on this genre, but here are some that I know & have enjoyed:

    Granados - very light, a mix of French salon, Spanish, Moorish (& even Hungarian?) styles
    Walton - an early work, the piano has a driving, Bartok like edge, while the strings remind one of the world of Debussy, Ravel & early Vaughan Williams
    Schnittke- no need to introduce this masterpiece. For me, it's like a fragile ornament that has shattered into a thousand pieces.
    Schubert 'Trout' - again, needs no introduction. Saw it performed live earlier this year, and it made me realise how much repetition happens in this work, almost as much as (say) in a Bruckner symphony, but obviously in a slightly different way.
    Brahms (forget which one) - the Hungarian ending is the most memorable aspect to this marvellous music...
    Igneous01 likes this.
    Contrasts and Connections in Music

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    how dare you guys forget Schumann's in E flat, and Ludwig Thuille's in E flat. Utter blasphemy to list Piano Quintets without mentioning Schumann and Thuille.

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    Don't know either Schumann or Thuille. Romantic era quintets?

    Piano Quintets I'm liking:

    1. Medtner
    2. Taneyev
    3. Schnittke
    4. Bacewicz
    5. Vainberg
    6. Fauré (the only non-USSR/Pole)

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    Senior Member HarpsichordConcerto's Avatar
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    Bartok wrote a Piano Quintet. I just bought the CD (to arrive). Anybody here care to comment about this piece of fine music or horror?

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    Senior Member Sebastien Melmoth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Head_case View Post
    Don't know either Schumann or Thuille. Romantic era quintets?
    Robert Schumann practically invented the Piano Quintet. Thuille's work in E flat is a late Romantic work in a Brahmsian mode.

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