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View Poll Results: Do you like Impressionism?

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Thread: Do You Enjoy Iimpressionism?

  1. #1
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    Default Do You Enjoy Iimpressionism?

    Vote here if you like Impressionism or not. I'm just curious how many of you like this style and how many of you don't. For those who do not, please share why you don't like it and what works you heard that turned you off to this style.
    Last edited by Mirror Image; Jul-23-2009 at 06:29.

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    Senior Member Sid James's Avatar
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    Yes to Debussy & Ravel, but no (or not as much) generally for English impressionists works. As far as, for example, Vaughan Williams goes, I like his impressionistic symphonies less than the modern sounding ones. I suppose one English impressionistic work I enjoy is Bax's Tintagel. I'm also getting into Delius, although this will be a long process. His works don't immediately grab me as much as those of the two Frenchmen above...
    Last edited by Sid James; Jul-23-2009 at 07:16.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andre View Post
    Yes to Debussy & Ravel, but no (or not really) generally for English impressionists works. As far as, for example, Vaughan Williams goes, I like his impressionistic symphonies less than the modern sounding ones. I suppose one English impressionistic work I enjoy is Bax's Tintagel. I'm also getting into Delius, although this will be a long process. His works don't immediately grab me as much as those of the two Frenchmen above...
    You should hear some Szymanowski. He's great too as well as de Falla, another one of my favorites of late. Another great impressionist is Paul Dukas.

    In regard to Delius, he will take some time for you to understand I think. He's actually a pretty challenging composer to get into for many people I think, but I think once you understand him better you'll like him.

    Rimsky-Korsakov isn't generally regarded as an impressionist, but his works definitely have an otherworldly feeling to them, almost like he's trying to give you some kind of location or event that's happening or unfolding right before you. He definitely predated this style.

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    Senior Member Sid James's Avatar
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    I enjoy those composers you mention, except Szymanowski, who I haven't heard that much from. I've heard his violin concertos which were interesting, but I'm yet to check out his symphonies. Would you really describe him as an impressionist? Judging from the violin concertos, I'd consider him more of a early modernist, but there are obviously aspects of impressionism in his music, I agree...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andre View Post
    I enjoy those composers you mention, except Szymanowski, who I haven't heard that much from. I've heard his violin concertos which were interesting, but I'm yet to check out his symphonies. Would you really describe him as an impressionist? Judging from the violin concertos, I'd consider him more of a early modernist, but there are obviously aspects of impressionism in his music, I agree...
    Would I consider Symanowski an Impressionist? Perhaps not a pure Impressionist, because his music draws from so many sources, but he was very much influenced by Debussy and Ravel. You can hear it in works like "Symphonie Concertante" or in the ballet "Harnasie."

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    Senior Member kg4fxg's Avatar
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    Default Impressionists

    Here is what I have so far listed under Impressionists. The attached file lists works then composer.

    All my composer files are like this:

    Satie, Erik (1866–1925); FRA; IMP

    They all end with music period for genre classification. Nice to my iPod scroll the composer as above.
    Attached Files Attached Files
    No, it's a Bb. It looks wrong and it sounds wrong, but it's right - Vaughan Williams.

    Bill Carter, CPA

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    Senior Member Sid James's Avatar
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    I wouldn't classify Satie as an impressionist, although he was probably influenced by them to a degree...

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    Default http://www.classicalarchives.com/

    Andre

    When I started to get more and more into classical music my library grew and then I put everything in iTunes as a way to see what I have in my collection.

    That said, I really did not know all the composers birth and death dates nor exactly what period to classify them under.

    I search and found this website that appears to have just about all the composers listed with Bio, Works, Albums, Essentials.

    I use the classification method in iTunes as all I have to type is Satie, and I get the following:

    Erik Satie (1866-1925); FRA; IMP

    I added the "; IMP" to the end so I know to choose Impressionism as the genre when I change my purchase in iTunes. The website lists the period on the screen to the right.

    Just because it is on the web does not make it absolutely correct.

    That said, I am not disagreeing with you but I may have made a mistake by relying so much on one website for all my information about classification?

    http://www.classicalarchives.com/

    Below is what they list about Satie. I have not studied him so I really have no place to speak. I am still working on my Vivaldi biographies.

    I do like the idea of classifying the composer's in iTunes in a uniform manner. I search more by composer than Artist.

    I have not really studied impressionism yet. Sorry, MI is way ahead of me.


    Erik Satie was an important French composer from the generation of Debussy. Best remembered for several groups of piano pieces, including Trois Gymnopédies (1888), Trois Sarabandes (1887) and Trois Gnossiennes (1890), he was championed by Jean Cocteau and helped create the famous group of French composers, Les Six, which was fashioned after his artistic ideal of simplicity in the extreme. Some have viewed certain of his stylistic traits as components of Impressionism, but his harmonies and melodies have relatively little in common with the characteristics of that school. Much of his music has a subdued character, and its charm comes through in its directness and its lack of allegiance to any one aesthetic. Often his melodies are melancholy and hesitant, his moods exotic or humorous, and his compositions as a whole, or their several constituent episodes, short. He was a musical maverick who probably influenced Debussy and did influence Ravel, who freely acknowledged as much. After Satie's second period of study, he began turning more serious in his compositions, eventually producing his inspiring cantata, Socrate, considered by many his greatest work and clearly demonstrating a previously unexhibited agility. In his last decade he turned out several ballets, including Parade and Relâche, indicating his growing predilection for program and theater music. Satie was also a pianist of some ability.

    As a child Erik Satie showed interest in music and began taking piano lessons from a local church organist, named Vinot. While he progressed during this period, he showed no unusual gifts. In 1879 he enrolled in the Paris Conservatory, where he studied under Descombe (piano) and Lavignac (solfeggio), but failed to meet minimum requirements and was expelled in 1882. Satie departed Paris on November 15, 1886, to join the infantry in Arras, but he found military life distasteful and intentionally courted illness to relieve himself of duty. That same year his first works were published: Elégie, Trois Mélodies, and Chanson.

    The years following his military service formed a bohemian period in Satie's life, the most significant events of which would be the beginnings of his friendship with Debussy, his exposure to eastern music at the Paris World Exhibition, and his association with a number of philosophical and religious organizations (most notably the Rosicrucian Brotherhood).

    In 1905 he decided to resume musical study, enrolling in the conservative and controversial Schola Cantorum, run by Vincent d'Indy. His music took on a more academic and rigorous quality, and also began to exhibit the dry wit that would become hallmarks of his style. Many of his compositions received odd titles, especially after 1910, such as Dried up embryos and Three real flabby preludes (for a dog). Some of his works also featured odd instructions for the performer, not intended to be taken seriously, as in his 1893 piano work, Vexations, which carries the admonition in the score, "To play this motif 840 times in succession, it would be advisable to prepare oneself beforehand, in the deepest silence, by serious immobilities."

    In 1925 Satie developed pleurisy and his fragile health worsened. He was taken to St. Joseph Hospital, where he lived on for several months. He received the last rites of the Catholic Church in his final days, and died on July 1, 1925.

    © AMG, All Music Guide
    No, it's a Bb. It looks wrong and it sounds wrong, but it's right - Vaughan Williams.

    Bill Carter, CPA

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    The only worthwhile compositions by Satie are the Gymnopedies and Gnossienes, from what I've heard. Did he compose anything else similar to those? Regardless, they remind me of Harold Budd and Brian Eno, especially Budd. The latter two do it better, but Satie laid the groundwork for some of the atmospheres that modern ambient often focuses on.

    I can't get into Ravel, but enjoy Debussy a lot. The preludes are wonderful. It's a shame that few people make use of or expand on his weird, evocative harmonies.

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    Senior Member danae's Avatar
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    Concerning French imressionism, Debussy and Ravel I listen to a lot. And studying their scores (not only orchestral) is imperative if you want to get into composition and orchestration.
    From the two I'm definately more into Ravel, mainly because of his more versatile approach (influences not only from Impressionism, but also from Neo-classicism and Jazz). But I adore Debussy's piano preludes, the string quartet, La mer and the Faun.

    I also like Satie very much, although he's definately not an Impressionist.

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    Debussy is one of my top three composers of all time. I also enjoy Ravel and some of the other Frenchies.

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    Quote Originally Posted by danae View Post
    Concerning French imressionism, Debussy and Ravel I listen to a lot. And studying their scores (not only orchestral) is imperative if you want to get into composition and orchestration.

    From the two I'm definately more into Ravel, mainly because of his more versatile approach (influences not only from Impressionism, but also from Neo-classicism and Jazz). But I adore Debussy's piano preludes, the string quartet, La mer and the Faun.
    I think I'm starting to like you a more.

    I definitely think Ravel was more versatile too. His compositions, but also his orchestrations, are unlike anything in the classical repertoire. I think his music is much more strict than Debussy's.

    That said I love both composers, but Ravel is definitely my favorite of the two.

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    I've listened to Debussy preludes and some orchestral/piano stuff by Ravel.

    I didn't like it and so far I'm not interested in exploring more impressionism.

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    I voted "yes"- but a qualified yes. I really enjoy some Impressionist works, like Debussy's Préludes, Ravel's Daphnis and Chloe, Fauré's piano quintets, and Franck's violin sonata. But impressionism often relies too much on atmosphere/orchestral colors and too little on interesting melodies and rhythms (some of Butterworth's and Delius' works, for example, fall into this category). At its best, though, impressionism is mesmerizing and completely engrossing.

    And I'm all for Spanish impressionism. Actually, I've got a major weak spot for Spanish music in general.
    Take a look at the Bandit's blog, Americana Avenue.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BuddhaBandit View Post
    I voted "yes"- but a qualified yes. I really enjoy some Impressionist works, like Debussy's Préludes, Ravel's Daphnis and Chloe, Fauré's piano quintets, and Franck's violin sonata. But impressionism often relies too much on atmosphere/orchestral colors and too little on interesting melodies and rhythms (some of Butterworth's and Delius' works, for example, fall into this category). At its best, though, impressionism is mesmerizing and completely engrossing.

    And I'm all for Spanish impressionism. Actually, I've got a major weak spot for Spanish music in general.
    Having surveyed most of Delius' orchestral output that's available on record, I can honestly say that it doesn't lack interesting melodies or rhythms. He composed many different kinds of pieces some of them are textural, but I think at his best Delius knew how to incorporate great rhythms and melodies into his works like "Brigg Fair" or "Sea Drift" for example.

    Butterworth, on the other hand, didn't really live long enough to forge a singular style, so I can't say much in his defense.

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