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Thread: Repertoire?

  1. #31
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    I am unfamiliar with the Ginastera as well... but all of the professors/teachers I have worked with thoroughly convinced me that i would absolutely love it. Gotta take advice from people you trust.

    ARCT exam is a musical exam past level 10 (Royal Conservatory of Music in Canada).
    You need to play one selection from each of the six lists:
    List A: Works by J. S. Bach
    List B: Classical Repertoire
    List C: Romantic Repertoire A
    List D: Romantic Repertoire B
    List E: 20th Century/Contemporary Work
    List F: Concert Etude

    i am planning on doing mine next year because i will need all the time to prepare all of my selections to their highest level.

  2. #32
    Senior Member Daniel's Avatar
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    @ Matthias: A great repertoire. Chopin's ballade: wonderful Chopin etudes need time for me :unsure:. Did you learn them quickly? Schubert is always awesome :P.

    @ilovebeethoven: Thanks, I didn't know this exam yet, am sure Nox will know it maybe...What other music-exams are there in Canada? And please let us know, how the Ginastera is.

  3. #33
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    Well, there are two major conservatories in Canada.

    Royal Conservatory of Music is the most popular one, but I don't think you get as much out of the program as you do Conservatory Canada. I myself am an RCM student, just because it is more accessible where I live. I am not very well-versed with Conservatory Canada, but i will try to describe RCM exams as well as i can

    RCM has 10 grades that progressively increase in difficulty. You progress to the next grade by passing a practical exam. Not all students choose to take exams, but you can earn credits in high school by completing them. The RCM Practical exams consist of
    1) repertoire: you choose one piece from each list to perform. levels one to six(?) have three lists, levels seven(?) to ten have four lists.
    2) technique: you need to play scales, triads, four-note chords, arpeggios, etc. (technical requirements) for given keys in each grade. Grade one technique is very simple, just c and g major scales (hands seperately) and triads, while grade ten technique is major, harmonic minor, melodic minor, seperated by a 3rd, seperated by a 6th, and octave scales, solid and broken four-note chords, arpeggios and inversions, dominant and diminished sevenths and inversions, arpeggios of dominant and diminished sevenths and inversions for every major and minor key.
    3) studies: you need to play 2 studies/etudes out of the level book. they are each worth 5 marks on the exam.
    4) sight reading and ear tests: speaks for itself.

    once you have completed grade 10, there are other options available to continue: Performers' ARCT and Teachers' ARCT. Performer's ARCT, which I am currently working on, consists solely of performing 6 pieces and answering questions about them from the examiner. Teacher's ARCT is hardcore technique, sight reading, and ear tests.

    RCM also has theory exams. Preliminary, Grade 1, and Grade 2 rudiments (the numbers do not correspond to practical exam grade levels) are basic theory skills such as writing chords, scales, cadences, basic music analysis, and italian terms. Preliminary Rudiments corresponds to grade 5 piano, Grade 1 Rudiments to Grade 6 piano, Grade 2 rudiments to grade 7 and 8 piano. After that, theory branches out into subsections, including grade 3, 4, and 5 harmony; grade 3, 4, and 5 music history, grade 5 and 6 counterpoint, and grade 5 and 6 analysis. after all this there is a hardcore ARCT theory exam. I doubt many people make it that far (giggles) as it takes a long time to master all the concepts in each grade.

    I have completed my grade 2 to 10 piano exams, and am currently working on repertoire for my ARCT exam. I am planning on doing my Performer's ARCT exam next winter. In RCM Theory, I have completed preliminary, grade 1, and grade 2 rudiments and grade 3 and 4 harmony. I am now studying grade 3 history and hope to complete that exam in the spring.

    That about covers it.

  4. #34
    Senior Member Daniel's Avatar
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    Thanks for the detailed answer.

    Many parallels here, just with different names. So you want to become a performer?

    Good luck with your preparing and exams!!

  5. #35
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    I do not want to be a performer at all.. I am just enjoy playing repertoire a lot more than technique.

    I would love to get my degree in keyboard performance and keep going on to a doctorate.... I think I would either like to teach piano in a university or conduct an orchestra.. but I still have plenty of time to think about it.

  6. #36
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    Unhappy

    Reportoire for Violist:

    3rd Position Scales Book(red cover)
    Suzuki Volume 4, Viola Concerto in G Major, Concerto for Violin in A minor
    Kruetzer Scales studies, (yellow cover)

    Songs:

    Bachhanale, Themes from the Moldau, Danse Macabre, Rodeo: A copland, Drifen(really cool song), Prelude and Fugue from the Well Tempered Clavier.

    and I think Im getting another private lesson since mine is only for 30 minutes.. so i might be adding some stuff!
    HEY. IM FIRST CHAIR VIOLA IN CYPS( Chicago Youth Prep Strings)

  7. #37
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    Ginastera is considered a D list programme*( out of the usual 4 ) if you play it for your ARCM or other boards. D list as in 20th century. I would say he's a cross breed between Seiber and Albeniz.
    Famous for his argentinian dance.
    He wrote sonatas also, worth checking it out.

  8. #38
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    Hello Friends,

    I used to play mostly Brahms, especially opus 116-119. But... i have a new pianoteacher and he told me that i did play everything "like Chopin"... So i try to build in a little Chopinrepertoire... perparing for a studentpeformance in May 2005... which gives me nightmares already... and a challenge as well.

    Currently practising

    etude opus 10 nr 9 in F-minor
    etude opus 25 nr 12 in C-minor
    nocturne opus 32 nr 2 in As-major
    impromptuse opus 51 in Ges-major

    But some i take a "brake" and play Brahms, Schubert and Bach..

    Andantegorgonzola

    :wub:

  9. #39
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    Repertoire? Now I play some Chopin's pieces like a
    Ballade no 1
    etude op.25 no 11
    Waltzes op. 18, 34 64
    Nocturne C sharp minor op.27
    ...

  10. #40
    Senior Member Daniel's Avatar
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    Updated repertoire: Working on pieces for an entry exam for conservatory or academy of music:

    Still Preludes and Fugues out of Book II of the Welltempered Clavier
    Sonata 18th by Beethoven (not sure if I will take it)
    Haydn sonata(s)
    Chopin etudes out of op. 25 (c-sharp and g-flat major)
    Mendelssohn's Rondo capriccioso (not for exam)
    and searching for contempory stuff and some good romantic repertoire. Any suggestions?

    AND Welcome on the board, Hamfast!

    How long have you been playing the piano?

    Greetings,
    Daniel

  11. #41
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    I want to play Barkarola of Chopin. Now I studied a first ballade

  12. #42
    Senior Member Daniel's Avatar
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    Update: Currently a Capriccio by Mendelssohn and the Wanderer Fantasie by Schubert. Lots to do!

    Daniel

  13. #43
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    Update: Currently a Capriccio by Mendelssohn and the Wanderer Fantasie by Schubert. Lots to do!
    I've been meaning to look into some Mendelssohn piano. Would you suggest anything for an indermediate/getting to advanced pianist? The Wanderer Fantasie is GORGEOUS!
    "Don't bother to look; I've composed all this already"
    -Gustav Mahler to Bruno Walter, who had stopped to admire mountain scenery in rural Austria

  14. #44
    Senior Member Daniel's Avatar
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    The problem I have in technique with some Mendelssohn music is: it is not so easy in hands, strange, but maybe this kind of technique I didn't learn or played enough.

    Intermediate-adanced pieces...What have you been playing currently?

    There are of course Mendelssohn's "songs without words", but they are a bit too much cliché for me...I mean if you think of Mendelssohn's pianomusic, you think so often just of his songs, but it would be unfair to his other pieces, which have a wide range. But his songs have a wide range from not so difficult to difficult to play

    A nice and not too difficult piece would be his Sonata in g-minor (he wrote it in the age of 11 or so), it has the typical "young" Mendelssohn style.

    His Seven Characteristic Pieces op.7 are not too difficult and very typical for Mendelssohn: lyric, counterpointal and fresh pieces.

    His Rondo Capriccioso in E-major of course. Has some parts to have a good technique, but lets you hear good progresses!

    So far,
    Daniel

  15. #45
    Junior Member liebeslieder's Avatar
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    1. Schubert D960
    2. Brahms Op.118
    3. some Chopin short pieces
    4. Beethoven Op.101, PS No.28
    5. Brahms Op.119

    the last two (4 & 5) are under way. too busy to play the piano.

    i m just an amateur.

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