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Thread: Current Listening Vol I

  1. #1516
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    maximum sound Violin When I was very childish.i liked it but I can not play it.what any way I can play it?

  2. #1517
    Senior Member Rachovsky's Avatar
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    Mehta / NYPO
    Beethoven: Violin Concerto in D
    Stravinsky: The Rite of Spring


    Music is the one incorporeal entrance into the higher world of knowledge which comprehends mankind but which mankind cannot comprehend. -- Beethoven

  3. #1518
    Senior Member Rachovsky's Avatar
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    Haven't purchased this album, but am listening from WQXR.com (Classical Music Radio of the NY Times). They have a performance of symphony hall every evening around 8-9. I urge you all to tune in every night. It's usually quite a good performance. I heard this recording once before and was quite enthused, but I must say it's a lot better now that I give it a second try. The climaxes are powerful and the LSO, as always, plays excellently.


    Music is the one incorporeal entrance into the higher world of knowledge which comprehends mankind but which mankind cannot comprehend. -- Beethoven

  4. #1519
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    This album has entertained me for weeks. I have yet to find performances of Bartok to rival those by Boulez.

  5. #1520
    Member periodinstrumentfan's Avatar
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    Schaffrath by Balestracci, viol and Beyer, baroque violin etc.
    http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/...mL._SS500_.jpg


    Venturini by David Plantier and La Cetra
    http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/...ZL._SS400_.jpg


    Geminiani by Elizabeth Wallfisch and the Purcell Quartet
    http://g-ecx.images-amazon.com/image...2ca7a110.L.jpg
    FIDEM IN FIDIBVS

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  7. #1521
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    Listening lately a lot to Tallis Scholars's Josquin Des Pres 'Missa Sine Nomine' & 'Missa Ad Fugam.' Beautiful/complex ('08 recent recording). (www.gimell.com). Also '06
    one by Renée Fleming, with Valery Gergiev cond. Orch. of the Mariinsky Theatre, 'Homage Age of the Diva.' Interesting program of arias tribute to turn of the century (20th that is) divas like Mary Garden/Emmy Destin/ etc. Some familiar like Tosca's 'Vissi d'arte,' or 'Poveri Fiori' from Adriana Lecouvreur; some obscure from Russian opera/Janacek's 'Jenufa,' Korngold, etc. (You can find link to details at www.reneefleming.com). I think a beautiful recording.

    Ed

  8. #1522
    Senior Member Elgarian's Avatar
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    I have been listening to one of my Christmas presents:



    Sometimes something hits me so hard that I barely know how to respond. If I'm sitting down, I want to stand up. If I'm standing, I want to sit down. Neither works. I want to tell someone else about what's happening, but at the same time I want to listen intently to lap up every last nuance of sound. This collection is one of those that has this effect. What Bartoli does with Handel's 'Lascia la spina' sends thrills up and down my spine, brings tears to my eyes, and leaves me wide eyed with awe. Just listen to that voice, from about 3.40 onwards: total control, every moment charged with the deepest meaning and feeling, as if the words are being recreated with new life as she sings.

    If I were the Grand Dictator of Great Britain, I'd decree that this collection be given free, to every child, at birth, as an example of what astounding things some human beings are capable of, how sensitively they can engage with life through their art, and how delicately (though with what consummate power) they can communicate their experience of it.

    I might change the cover art, though.

  9. #1523
    Senior Member Moldyoldie's Avatar
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    From the following boxset...

    Beethoven: Symphony No. 9
    Aase Nordmo Lövberg, soprano; Christa Ludwig, mezzo-soprano; Waldemar Kmentt, tenor; Hans Hotter, baritone
    Philharmonia Orchestra & Chorus
    Otto Klemperer, cond.
    EMI (Disc #6 of 9)

    Several weeks ago on another message board, there was a very brief tête-à-tête concerning this recording of Beethoven's Ninth wherein it was suggested by a poster that it's comparable to Karajan's vaunted '63 recording. At the time I wondered if that "suggestion" was merely a misunderstanding on my part since I've always felt the Klemperer to be miles removed from Karajan in almost every conceivable way. I promised myself a reassessment; it came this morning. However, there's no use pretending it's an actual reassessment since my feelings remain unchanged -- this is a plodding, hardened, overall schlerotic performance devoid of the "joy" that's supposedly this work's raison d'etre. Klemperer effected strict, deliberate tempi throughout, albeit exposing a great deal of orchestral detail that's captured impressively by the EMI recording dating from 1957. The vocal soloists are at best adequate and likewise captured, if the chorus leaves something to be desired in the way of clarity and sonic vibrancy. I could make the ameliorating attempt to pinpoint certain "highlights" in Klemperer's rendition whereby his approach may be justified, but there's no use in thinking that it would in any way preclude my suggestion to novice listeners to avoid this recording until one is well-versed in this great work's wonderful mysteries and utter joys as promulgated by any number of great recorded performances...Karajan's included.
    "Everywhere is within walking distance if you have the time."
    -Steve Wright

  10. #1524
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    Default hello all music lovers

    today ,New Years day, NZ Concert Radio plays the 30 most popular classical voted by NZ listeners .Im listening to number 25 -- Gorecki Symphony No 3 .Yes it gets a thumbs up from me .I liked it .

  11. #1525
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    Hey!!!

    right now i´m not listening to anything, but at the beginning of this afternoon i listened to La Bohéme with Anna Netrebko and Rolando Vilazon and Paganini´s violin concerto nº1 played by Hilary Hahn:-)

    The paganini works fo violin are really amazing... One of my favourite composers:-)

    Hugs
    David

  12. #1526
    Senior Member Moldyoldie's Avatar
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    Included in this 2-CD budget set...
    Barber: Overture to "The School for Scandal"; Adagio for Strings; Essays for Orchestra Nos. 1-3; Medea's Dance of Vengeance
    Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra
    Leonard Slatkin, cond.
    EMI

    This has been in my collection since it was released in the late '80s and still represents well-nigh definitive (there's that word I hate using!) one-stop shopping for the many compactly composed orchestral gems of Samuel Barber. Quibbles can be made here or there concerning tempos, phrasing, and balances; but all are performed with a fine grasp of Barber's distinctly 20th century American idiom. Returning to it this morning, my main complaint has to do with the sound quality which could certainly do with a "refurbishing"; I'm wondering if such was effected on the recent EMI Gemini re-release shown on the right above. As to the performances; the brass, winds, and percussion make themselves effectively heard and felt; but the otherwise fine strings are often noticeably underpowered. I found myself wishing to hear this performed with the likes of the Berlin Philharmonic...for shame!
    "Everywhere is within walking distance if you have the time."
    -Steve Wright

  13. #1527
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    Right now i´m hearing the violin concert nº3 of Paganini played by S.Accardo :-)

    really amazing

    Hugz
    David

  14. #1528
    Senior Member World Violist's Avatar
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    Mahler: Symphony No. 6 in A minor
    Mitropoulos/Cologne WDR Sinfonie Orchester

    This is undoubtably one of the more intense and self-annihilating utterances of early twentieth-century music. And Mitropoulos conducts it for all it's worth, leaving a listener entirely and utterly exhausted by the end. The first movement goes by quickly; he doesn't take the exposition repeat. However, the second movement (here the Scherzo, which I prefer anyway) is absolute hell to go through. Mitropoulos makes it tear at your heart until, when it seems you can no longer bear it. And then there's the comparative oasis of the Andante - comparative, I say, because there is little that is truly oasis-like about it - which has its heart played out with such bittersweet emotion that it, too, wears one out entirely.

    And then you wake up and realize, "Oh shoot... that's only half way through!" and the finale absolutely kills in this recording. True, there are several flubs and whatnot (I believe this is a live recording, so there's the excuse), but that does nothing to subdue the monstrous horror that this music becomes. I got a bare hint of this kind of hellishness in my Bernstein recording, but this is the real deal. Shrieking trumpets, sneering woodwinds, those utterly terrifying deep bells... it puts one through the emotional ringer, surely enough.

    One of the interesting things I've noticed about this recording is that the hammerblows get steadily louder; the first is barely noticeable, the second decently enough penetrating, and the third is still overcome by the immense power of the timpani and brass. I'm not entirely sure what Mitropoulos has the hammerblows coming from, but it just doesn't do enough for my taste. That's my one and only quirk about this whole recording, other than possibly the lack of exposition repeat (but then that would be another 5 minutes of gut-wrenching music like this!). But with the rest of the music played like THIS, the hammerblows are devastating enough even if you can't hear them.

    And, just in case you don't like this: Mitropoulos has a very free sense of tempo. In the outer movements, the tempo is pulled every which way, which I think adds to the drama, immediacy, and ultimately the impact, of this recording. It stretches one out to the very brink emotionally, which I'm sure Mahler intended as he composed it.
    You get a frog in your throat, you sound hoarse.

  15. #1529
    Member Azathoth's Avatar
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    Listening to Jaroussky singing Vivaldi's Virtuoso Cantatas while trying to figure out how to get at my Buxtehude harpsichord works I got off of iTunes...but downloaded to another computer.
    Weep not for little Leonie,
    Abducted by a French marquis!
    Though loss of honor was a wrench
    Just think how it's improved her French.

  16. #1530
    Senior Member phoenixshade's Avatar
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    Default Mozart – Clarinet Quintet in A

    Quote Originally Posted by Azathoth View Post
    Listening to Jaroussky singing Vivaldi's Virtuoso Cantatas while trying to figure out how to get at my Buxtehude harpsichord works I got off of iTunes...but downloaded to another computer.
    Yeah, that's the beauty of iTunes "digital rights management" for you... the task you have set before yourself is virtually impossible, unless you paid the extra money for DRM-free versions of the files. That's just one of several reasons why I will never buy from iTunes.

    But, in keeping with the topic of the thread:

    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart – Clarinet Quintet K.581 / Horn Quintet K.407 / Oboe Quartet K.370
    Anthony Pay / Timothy Brown / Neil Black
    Academy of St. Martin in the Fields Chamber Ensemble
    (Phillips 422 833-2)



    The Clarinet Quintet is by far the highlight of this disc. Anthony Pay gives perhaps the best rendition of this work I've ever heard.

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