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Thread: What was the last film you watched?

  1. #7486
    Senior Member MacLeod's Avatar
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    A Quiet Place.

    "In a post-apocalyptic world, a family is forced to live in silence while hiding from monsters with ultra-sensitive hearing."

    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt6644200...ef_=tt_stry_pl

    Odd. 86 minutes went swiftly by, and I enjoyed it. It got very positive reviews, but barely ten minutes in and a gaping plot hole appears - well, not so much in plot as in characterisation. Given the circumstances the family face, and the threat to their very survival, and their evident care for each other, it seems wholly unlikely that they would take their eyes off their 4 year old for a second time so he could do something he'd already been told he shouldn't.
    "I left TC for a hiatus, but since no-one noticed my absence, I came back again."

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  3. #7487
    Senior Member Kieran's Avatar
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    Dressed to Kill, starring Basil Rathbone as Sherlock Holmes, and Nigel Bruce as Watson. Top notch stuff!

    The night before this I binged on Prometheus and Alien Covenant. I loved the first but was bitterly disappointed that AC didn't follow on and answer the questions posed at the end of Prometheus. In fact, it became yet another simplistic retelling of all the generic Alien franchise movies...
    Last edited by Kieran; Aug-30-2018 at 17:23.
    The Brain - is wider than the Sky

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  5. #7488
    Senior Member Barbebleu's Avatar
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    Avengers Assemble. Best line is by the Hulk after smacking Loki around like a rag doll - 'Puny God!'
    Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate!

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  7. #7489
    Senior Member Rogerx's Avatar
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    “Never argue with an idiot. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.” ― Mark Twain

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  9. #7490
    Senior Member Gordontrek's Avatar
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    My two most recently-watched films are two of the finest I've ever seen.
    No Country for Old Men (2007) might just be the best dang movie I've ever seen. It takes place in the late 70s/early 80s, and is about a Vietnam veteran who finds a briefcase with several million dollars of drug money at the site of a drug deal gone wrong. He keeps the money for himself only to find himself being chased by a psychotic killer who works for the operation that was in charge of the failed drug deal and wants the money back. Beautifully shot and very well directed by the Cohen brothers. Also, Javier Bardem turned in a performance for the ages as the psychotic killer. Best portrayal of a psychopath since Anthony Hopkins in Silence of the Lambs.

    I finally got around to watching The Godfather (1972). What a fine piece of art it is. I don't have much else to say about it except WOW- the closest thing to perfect in the history of cinema. The acting, directing, cinematography, musical score, everything is just at the top of the game. It's also scary too, being an accurate depiction of the Italian mafia of the 40s. I was initially put off by Marlon Brando's breathy voice and slow demeanor, but came to appreciate it much more as the film went on.
    Last edited by Gordontrek; Sep-01-2018 at 16:45.
    "May God have mercy on my enemies, because I won't." - George S. Patton

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  11. #7491
    Senior Member Vronsky's Avatar
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    The Ninth Gate (1999)
    Directed by: Roman Polanski
    Starring: Johnny Depp

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  13. #7492
    Senior Member JAS's Avatar
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    I rather enjoy The Ninth Gate, until about the last 1/4 or so, where it seems to me that it begins to go off the rails. Although Depp is too young for the role, and the touches of grey don't really make him look that much older, I thought he did a much better job in the film than in ones where he is intentionally overplaying (such as the Pirates of the Caribbean or most of the Tim Burton films).

    I have finally bought a set of Vincent Price movies on blu-ray (only available in that form), and am looking forward to the commentaries and extras for movies that I already know very well. (I am still waiting for them to arrive in the mail.)
    Last edited by JAS; Sep-01-2018 at 17:41.

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  15. #7493
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    After a bit of a drought, I finally saw two films that I thought were excellent--well written, well acted, and beautifully shot:

    "Darkest Hour"--Gary Oldman has the uncanny ability to be able to become other people--Sid Vicious, Beethoven, Joe Orton, and now Winston Churchill. He's brilliant. Joe Wright is one of our finest filmmakers.

    "Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri"--this is a remarkable film, I gather it was a bit of sleeper? Excellent performances from Sam Rockwell, Frances McDormand, and Woody Harrelson.

    Staying with Frances McDormand, I then watched the Coen brothers film, "Fargo", which I've seen many times--speaking of brilliant peformances & films. (I also never tire of seeing "The Big Lebowski" either.)
    Last edited by Josquin13; Sep-01-2018 at 19:30.

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  17. #7494
    Senior Member JAS's Avatar
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    I also thought that "Darkest Hour" was quite good, and particularly Oldman, although parts of it felt disjointed, and they were pushing the eccentricity rather hard (including Oldman).

    "Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri" is quite daring in giving us very three-dimensional main characters. Even the ones we generally like do things we don't like, and the ones we don't much like mostly do something at least partially redemptive. My chief complaint is that one main part (no spoilers) is clearly a blatant manipulation of the audience to a degree that I think is totally unforgivable. Partly as a result, the ending is very unsatisfying for me.
    Last edited by JAS; Sep-01-2018 at 19:26.

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  19. #7495
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    I'm finally getting around to seeing the Bogart/Bacall movies, having stumbled on a set of them.

    I started with The Maltese Falcon, where Bogart is set against Mary Astor - a nice job but not too convincing as someone who would pierce the heart of Bogart's character; she comes off more as a manipulative liar.

    In contrast, Bacall appears in The Big Sleep, and she makes herself Bogart's equal in cynicism and worldly wisdom/weariness. The plot is hard to follow - it's very convoluted - but their interaction is fun to watch.

    Bacall is the same in To Have And Have Not. Another actress was supposed to be the love interest, but Bacall so overshadowed her that Bacall became the focus of the film.

    I'm looking forward to seeing the next two, Key Largo and another one.

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  21. #7496
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    JAS--Good points. Yes, I agree about the ending of Three Billboards. I was disappointed, too. I wonder if the 'disjointed' quality of Darkest hours wasn't intentional, or do you think it's a weakness in the script, or due to leaving too much of the film on the cutting room floor? Yes, it seemed a bit episodic to me, but that may have added to the nature of the subject matter--I'm not sure. I don't know if I'd have wanted to watch another hour or so myself (in order for the film to seem less disjointed).

    As for Sir Winston's eccentricity, the scene of him walking around in the nude was accurate, along with his heavy drinking. But they could have done more with Churchill's sharp, humorous wit, possibly, which would have made the character less eccentric, and more human. I am reminded of the time that playwright George Bernard Shaw sent Churchill two tickets to the opening night of one of his plays, with the attached note, "Bring a friend, if you have one." Churchill replied, "I can't make it on opening night. I'll attend the second night, if you have one."
    Last edited by Josquin13; Sep-01-2018 at 22:16.

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  23. #7497
    Senior Member Vronsky's Avatar
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    Purple Noon/Plein Soleil (1960)
    Directed by: René Clément
    Starring: Alain Delon, Maurice Ronet & Marie Laforêt

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  25. #7498
    Senior Member JAS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Josquin13 View Post
    I wonder if the 'disjointed' quality of Darkest hours wasn't intentional, or do you think it's a weakness in the script, or due to leaving too much of the film on the cutting room floor?
    Without any insider information, I cannot say with any confidence. It may be that the film was too long and it became fragmented in being re-edited to fit what was decreed as a more appropriate running time. It may also just be that eschewing a strong narrative seems to be considered edgy these days.

    Edit: I understand that the blu-ray release has a very good commentary by the director, which may or may not address the issue.
    Last edited by JAS; Sep-02-2018 at 13:34.

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  27. #7499
    Senior Member Rogerx's Avatar
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    Bit long, great story/ worth watching nevertheless.
    Last edited by Rogerx; Sep-04-2018 at 05:17.
    “Never argue with an idiot. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.” ― Mark Twain

  28. #7500
    Senior Member Vronsky's Avatar
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    The Ghost Writer (2010)
    Directed by: Roman Polanski
    Starring: Ewan McGregor, Pierce Brosnan, Kim Cattrall, Olivia Williams

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