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Thread: What was the last film you watched?

  1. #8821
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    Went to see "Jojo Rabbit" and "Love Aaj Kal" at the cinema this weekend.



    Last edited by Andrew Kenneth; Feb-16-2020 at 18:50.

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  3. #8822
    Senior Member Jacck's Avatar
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    Cabaret (1972)
    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0068327/
    7/10



    a drama/musical/romantic movie set during the Weimar Republic in Berlin. The nazis play only a small background part in this movie, it is more about some strange relationship between Michael York and Liza Minelli. I enjoyed the music and the cabaret performances, but I found Liza Minelli and the whole character that she played quite annoying.

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    Senior Member Rogerx's Avatar
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    Another from my top 5
    “Never argue with an idiot. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.” ― Mark Twain

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  7. #8824
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    410F1E0C-53FB-40AD-9968-9987B188E1C4.jpg

    Destination Wedding (2018)

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  9. #8825
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jacck View Post
    Cabaret (1972)
    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0068327/
    7/10



    a drama/musical/romantic movie set during the Weimar Republic in Berlin. The nazis play only a small background part in this movie, it is more about some strange relationship between Michael York and Liza Minelli. I enjoyed the music and the cabaret performances, but I found Liza Minelli and the whole character that she played quite annoying.
    O.T.T. but everybody remembers it.
    “Never argue with an idiot. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.” ― Mark Twain

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  11. #8826
    Senior Member Biwa's Avatar
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  13. #8827
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    The Fifth Seal (1976)
    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0075467/
    10/10

    A Hungarian psychological philosophical film that explores the ethical choices under a totalitarian system. It is set in Hungary during the nazi occupation, but I have little doubt that the author was actually criticizing the communist system. And I find it surprising that the movie was allowed to be made at all. It has the depth of a Bergmann movie, but is actually told more coherently and powerfully.
    https://moviessansfrontiers.blogspot...ro-zoltan.html
    Last edited by Jacck; Feb-17-2020 at 17:28.

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  15. #8828
    Senior Member pianozach's Avatar
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    Zootopia

    We picked up maybe 3 dozen random DVDs at a garage sale for free. Zootopia came without it's box, just a loose disc.

    I had no real expectations - except animated animals. I think I expected dinosaurs . . . people riding dinosaurs. With spears.

    Turns out it's a whodunnit with a couple of extraordinary ethical lessons on behavior. By anthropomorphistic animals.

    The two major lessons:

    1. It has two major characters giving genuine apologies for their behavior.
    2. Using animals instead of humans it teaches tolerance and inclusiveness.

    The animation is top notch as well.

    products_zootopia_dvd_5d509f19.png
    Last edited by pianozach; Feb-17-2020 at 20:22.

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  17. #8829
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jacck View Post
    Cabaret (1972)
    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0068327/
    7/10



    a drama/musical/romantic movie set during the Weimar Republic in Berlin. The nazis play only a small background part in this movie, it is more about some strange relationship between Michael York and Liza Minelli. I enjoyed the music and the cabaret performances, but I found Liza Minelli and the whole character that she played quite annoying.
    This film upsets me, and likely not for the reason you might guess.

    It's more about how the film industry takes a successful and critically-acclaimed theatrical production, and decides to make a film out of it because it IS such a great show . . . then completely change it.

    YES, I'm aware the film received a high amount of praise, but I take issue with that praise. Frankly, it's one of the most overrated films of all time.

    In THIS case, the highly successful stage musical was actually successful for it's integrated storyline about the two main characters, the jewish greengrocer Herr Schultz and the non-jewish boardinghouse operator Fräulein Schneider, and how the rise of Nazism doomed their late-in-life romance and impending marriage. The book by Joe Masteroff (based on John Van Druten's 1951 play I Am a Camera, which was adapted from the short novel Goodbye to Berlin (1939) by Christopher Isherwood) used the scenes in the Cabaret as metaphorical commentary on life outside, both politically and personally. Honestly, the film is pretty short on plot, but that's because THEY CUT THE PLOT.

    You don't remember these main characters? Schultze was completely cut from the film, and Schneider was reduced to a single line "I'll show you to your room", or something to that effect. The plot line of their doomed romance, and the consequences of a German falling in love with a Jew during the rise of Nazi anti-semitism was cut.

    The film was significantly rewritten and eliminates all but six of the original songs from the very successful stage production, which was nominated for an astonishing ELEVEN Tony Awards, winning in EIGHT categories.

    Along with Schultz and Schneider, the songs sung by these characters were also cut: Two solos by each character, plus two duets.

    Also gone is Cliff's solo (as well as his duet with Sally, AND his bisexuality). Don't remember Cliff either? Cliff Bradshaw was Sally's roommate/love interest, but he was inexplicably renamed Brian Roberts for the film.

    But Sally Bowles, the English Cabaret headliner had two songs added for the film. And because Liza's English accent was evidently atrocious, her character became American, and Cliff went from being American to being an Englishman. And in the musical, Sally's charm is because she's a foreigner (exotic!, eh?) with a larger-than-life presence both on and offstage, NOT because she's an astonishingly good singer. And Sally, as the only remaining main character leaves the film without a soul, without a heart, and without redemption. Sally is shallow and unlikeable, and as the only main character left for this version of Cabaret, so is the film.

    Yeah, OK, the film version won a great many awards (it won EIGHT Oscars out of nominations in ten categories). Yes, Liza was quite the performer. But acting-wise she had the depth of a cookie pan. The musical number "Cabaret" was the worst part. Sally, still in denial, sees her entire world crumbling around her, but Liza sings and dances like she doesn't have a care in the world, mugging as though this song has no subtext at all.

    Ultimately, the film sacrificed far too much of it's source material:

    Musically the film retained only 6 of the original 16 main songs (remember - it won a Tony for Best Score), it sacrificed the two main characters as well as the plot, and converted the award-winning complex musical into a goofy revue about cabaret singer. So . . . as a result, the songs they retained (all but one in the Cabaret), and the few they added (all in the Cabaret) are all lacking the context (the excised "plot") that made them work so well as metaphors on stage. The songs in the musical were written as commentary on the plot, not to be the main event.

    Overrated. Even though it was choreographed by Bob Fosse.

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  19. #8830
    Senior Member Jacck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pianozach View Post
    This film upsets me, and likely not for the reason you might guess.

    It's more about how the film industry takes a successful and critically-acclaimed theatrical production, and decides to make a film out of it because it IS such a great show . . . then completely change it.

    YES, I'm aware the film received a high amount of praise, but I take issue with that praise. Frankly, it's one of the most overrated films of all time.

    In THIS case, the highly successful stage musical was actually successful for it's integrated storyline about the two main characters, the jewish greengrocer Herr Schultz and the non-jewish boardinghouse operator Fräulein Schneider, and how the rise of Nazism doomed their late-in-life romance and impending marriage. The book by Joe Masteroff (based on John Van Druten's 1951 play I Am a Camera, which was adapted from the short novel Goodbye to Berlin (1939) by Christopher Isherwood) used the scenes in the Cabaret as metaphorical commentary on life outside, both politically and personally. Honestly, the film is pretty short on plot, but that's because THEY CUT THE PLOT.

    You don't remember these main characters? Schultze was completely cut from the film, and Schneider was reduced to a single line "I'll show you to your room", or something to that effect. The plot line of their doomed romance, and the consequences of a German falling in love with a Jew during the rise of Nazi anti-semitism was cut.

    The film was significantly rewritten and eliminates all but six of the original songs from the very successful stage production, which was nominated for an astonishing ELEVEN Tony Awards, winning in EIGHT categories.

    Along with Schultz and Schneider, the songs sung by these characters were also cut: Two solos by each character, plus two duets.

    Also gone is Cliff's solo (as well as his duet with Sally, AND his bisexuality). Don't remember Cliff either? Cliff Bradshaw was Sally's roommate/love interest, but he was inexplicably renamed Brian Roberts for the film.

    But Sally Bowles, the English Cabaret headliner had two songs added for the film. And because Liza's English accent was evidently atrocious, her character became American, and Cliff went from being American to being an Englishman. And in the musical, Sally's charm is because she's a foreigner (exotic!, eh?) with a larger-than-life presence both on and offstage, NOT because she's an astonishingly good singer. And Sally, as the only remaining main character leaves the film without a soul, without a heart, and without redemption. Sally is shallow and unlikeable, and as the only main character left for this version of Cabaret, so is the film.

    Yeah, OK, the film version won a great many awards (it won EIGHT Oscars out of nominations in ten categories). Yes, Liza was quite the performer. But acting-wise she had the depth of a cookie pan. The musical number "Cabaret" was the worst part. Sally, still in denial, sees her entire world crumbling around her, but Liza sings and dances like she doesn't have a care in the world, mugging as though this song has no subtext at all.

    Ultimately, the film sacrificed far too much of it's source material:

    Musically the film retained only 6 of the original 16 main songs (remember - it won a Tony for Best Score), it sacrificed the two main characters as well as the plot, and converted the award-winning complex musical into a goofy revue about cabaret singer. So . . . as a result, the songs they retained (all but one in the Cabaret), and the few they added (all in the Cabaret) are all lacking the context (the excised "plot") that made them work so well as metaphors on stage. The songs in the musical were written as commentary on the plot, not to be the main event.

    Overrated. Even though it was choreographed by Bob Fosse.
    thank, I did not know all the background. We agree that the movie is overrated. The best part of the movie for me was the performance of Joel Grey

  20. #8831
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jacck View Post
    thank, I did not know all the background. We agree that the movie is overrated. The best part of the movie for me was the performance of Joel Grey
    Joel Grey was excellent. It's a thankless role as originally written . . . He's the only character in the musical that has no life outside of the cabaret. They fixed that in subsequent revivals, mostly due to the addition of the restoration of a song cut pre-opening from the initial version, "I Don't Care Much" and the inclusion of a short scene near the end where it's revealed that the MC is actually Jewish, which makes all the songs he sings in the Cabaret, especially "If You Could See Her", all the more ironic and impactful.

    I, however, preferred Grey's take on the MC that he did on the Broadway recording.

    It is interesting to listen to how very different his theatrical and cinematic versions of the same character are . . . . I'll assume that both he and director Fosse felt the role deserved a fresh take for the film. Even Grey's accent is different. Of course, Broadway recordings are usually done very early in a Musical's performance run (in this cast the Original Broadway Cast album was released only eight days after Opening Night), and it's very possible that the role 'evolved' during the run.

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  22. #8832
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    Great watching.
    “Never argue with an idiot. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.” ― Mark Twain

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  24. #8833
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jacck View Post
    thank, I did not know all the background. We agree that the movie is overrated. The best part of the movie for me was the performance of Joel Grey
    I knew most of it, after seen it but.................. for me it's still..................... "Divine darling" ( quoting Sally)
    “Never argue with an idiot. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.” ― Mark Twain

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  26. #8834
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    Sorcerer (1977)
    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0076740/
    8/10



    a nerve-racking truck in a jungle thriller. The truck on a bridge scene is 10/10
    Last edited by Jacck; Feb-18-2020 at 16:28.

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  28. #8835
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    Bohemian Rhapsody.
    Perhaps not in the right mood, mediocre I would say.
    “Never argue with an idiot. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.” ― Mark Twain

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