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Thread: Universal Appreciation

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    Senior Member Edward Elgar's Avatar
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    Default Universal Appreciation

    Don't you find that you are willing to sample every type of music, whereas those with a passion for rock or R&B wouldn't even consider listening to a classical peice? It just goes to show which denomination have the most open minds!
    When all the paint has been dried, when all the stone has been carved, music shall remain, and we shall work with what remains.

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    Senior Member Hexameron's Avatar
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    Well I have to say I used to be one of those with a passion for rock who would never listen to "a bunch of guys in wigs." Once I heard moonlight sonata that all changed. After I discovered what classical music really was, I said goodbye to every other kind of music forever. For me it was like I had only been looking at drawings in comic books and then suddenly I realized that hundreds of museums of the finest art ever created exists out there.

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    Since the time I turned to classical music, I haven't gone much into rock or r&b or "hip hop". But maybe once in a decade or so, I wonder if perhaps I am missing out on something, so I check it out, then it wears thin on me, and I give up on it again.

    Now...that's not to say I'm exclusively listening to classical music. I said I don't often listen to rock, r&b or hip hop--but there's more than that to choose from.

    I'm crazy for tango music, especially tango songs. They're almost like miniature classical pieces to me, or miniature operas. My screen name, "orchesta tipica", is a tango sextet, which is made up of two violins, a piano, a double bass, and two bandoneons. If I were polled on what my favorite instrument is, I'd say the bandoneon. I love this music. I have twenty to thirty cds of it. My favorite singers are usually old-school ones, like Libertad Lamarque, Susana Rinaldi, Floreal Ruiz, Alberto Podesta, Roberto Goyeneche, and of course, the king of tango--not Piazzola--but Carlos Gardel. Piazzola is a major force to be sure, and I love him too. But I don't at the same time discount the more traditional tango that I find myself listening to quite a bit.

    And then I have recently grown fond of Brazil's bossa nova, from the most famous standards to the not so famous. I know it was a big pop culture thing in the 60s, but there is a lot to admire about their way of singing, that much of it doesn't seem dated at all; some of these songs are very soothing and delicately sublime to the ears.

    Almost from the time I delved into classical music, I've also explored traditional music from around the world. I love different cultures, and there's no better way of getting to know them than by way of their music. I have in my collection classical music from Iran, Central Asia, Russian balalaika music, and the Soviet Army chorus, Quebecois, Cajun and Zydeco even, and African music, Balinese gamelan, Peking opera, and I have a whole case full of Indian classical music from the north and the south. And of course I'm fond of certain voices, like that of Edith Piaff and Charles Aznavour.

    And I like jazz, which covers a wide spectrum of styles within itself. I'm particularly fond of 20s jazz, like that of Louis Armstrong as a young man, and Bix Beiderbecke. One can't go wrong with acquiring a complete set of Armstrong's "Hot Fives and Sevens." It should be an indelible part of anyone's jazz collection. And then I like some of Herbie Hancock's music from the 60s.

    And then film scores can sometimes be very interesting. I'll see a great movie with a great soundtrack and want to buy it afterwards, and not just for the music, but because I like to think of the movie when I listen to it.

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    How does anyone know that rock fans won't sample classical. The chances are they have sampled it and don't like it. That's my experience of people who are not keen on classical whenever I have asked. On the few occasions I have tried to "enlighten" them about the virtues of classical, I have never succeeded in the sense of achieving any lasting converts.

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    Senior Member ChamberNut's Avatar
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    I was a rock fan (anything ranging from the Beach Boys to Black Sabbath), mainly hard rock, from my youth until 'bout 3 years ago.

    It was a gradual transition, but now I hardly ever listen to any pop rock/hard rock (old or new), and my taste for music is almost exclusively classical music.

    Who would have thought? Not I! But I can tell you that I, personally, have never experienced anything quite as beautiful, enriching and rewarding as 'getting into' classical music. It's a wonderful world!

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChamberNut View Post
    I was a rock fan (anything ranging from the Beach Boys to Black Sabbath), mainly hard rock, from my youth until 'bout 3 years ago.

    It was a gradual transition, but now I hardly ever listen to any pop rock/hard rock (old or new), and my taste for music is almost exclusively classical music.

    Who would have thought? Not I! But I can tell you that I, personally, have never experienced anything quite as beautiful, enriching and rewarding as 'getting into' classical music. It's a wonderful world!
    I can imagine some married couples finishing up in the divorce courts unless the "other half" has a similar transition. Reason for breakdown:" irreconcilable differences in musical tastes". I suppose the moral is don't get hooked up until you have sorted out your musical tastes.

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    Senior Member StlukesguildOhio's Avatar
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    After I discovered what classical music really was, I said goodbye to every other kind of music forever. For me it was like I had only been looking at drawings in comic books and then suddenly I realized that hundreds of museums of the finest art ever created exists out there.

    I still maintain a broad array of musical tastes. I can't say that I like everything. Rap is certainly out of the question. Still, beyond the realm of classical music I still enjoy jazz, some rock/pop, and real country/bluegrass (and not that pop with a southern accent crap) and various examples of folk music from around the world. Your analogy with visual art is quite interesting... and as a visual artist I might pick it up and suggest that while nothing will compete with Michelangelo, Titian, Rembrandt, and Rubens there are works of art from non-Western cultures which seem almost crude... untutored by the standards of Western art... as well as certain products of folk artists or outsider artists that have a certain raw spark that is lacking in a lot of what we define as "high art". Certainly many of the best artists were clearly inspired by the work of the untrained artist, the visionary artist, the art or children, etc... (Picasso, Klee, Dubuffet, Miro, etc...) I don't doubt that the great composers equally have drawn inspiration from "simpler" folk music. While nothing will eclipse Bach for me, I can't imagine not letting loose with some Louvin Brothers, Rolling Stones, or Miles Davis from time to time.

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    Senior Member StlukesguildOhio's Avatar
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    I like jazz, which covers a wide spectrum of styles within itself. I'm particularly fond of 20s jazz, like that of Louis Armstrong as a young man, and Bix Beiderbecke. One can't go wrong with acquiring a complete set of Armstrong's "Hot Fives and Sevens." It should be an indelible part of anyone's jazz collection. And then I like some of Herbie Hancock's music from the 60s.

    Certainly The Hot Fives and Sevens constitutes an essential part of any jazz collection... any collection of 20th century music... or any collection of American music. I also love the Loius Armstrong Plays W.C. Handy recording. It gives you some idea of what Armstrong's band might have sounded like in the 20s had the recording technology been better. I must admit, however, that I lean far more toward Ellington and bop (late 40s-early 60s): Miles, Monk, Coletrane, Lennie Tristano, etc...

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    What Topaz wrote here is SO true. If great music means so much to a person it matters as much when in a relationship. To love a thing with passion and not be able to share it with a partner is a risky combination.

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    Senior Member ChamberNut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by robert newman View Post
    What Topaz wrote here is SO true. If great music means so much to a person it matters as much when in a relationship. To love a thing with passion and not be able to share it with a partner is a risky combination.
    Robert,

    I don't necessarily agree with you and Topaz in this case.

    Although I mainly listen to classical, my girlfriend listens to a variety of music. She does like classical, but is more of a hip-hop, pop, and blues fan.

    I think you and your significant other can have different tastes in music and it not have an effect on the relationship, just as the same is true with having different interests/hobbies.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChamberNut View Post
    Robert,

    I don't necessarily agree with you and Topaz in this case.

    Although I mainly listen to classical, my girlfriend listens to a variety of music. She does like classical, but is more of a hip-hop, pop, and blues fan.

    I think you and your significant other can have different tastes in music and it not have an effect on the relationship, just as the same is true with having different interests/hobbies.
    The point I was making, slightly tongue in cheek I admit, is that if there is a big change in musical tastes after the event (knotted, wed, hooked up, spliced) it could be awkward. You can possibly imagine two head-bangers getting spliced, and having a huge fall out if one day Mrs Head-banger decides she's now into Gregorian chants, and Charles Head-banger now fancies Rap. Just think of the scene: rows galore, ketchup up the walls, suitcases being packed. Doesn't bear thinking of. Terrible scenes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Topaz View Post
    The point I was making, slightly tongue in cheek I admit, is that if there is a big change in musical tastes after the event (knotted, wed, hooked up, spliced) it could be awkward. You can possibly imagine two head-bangers getting spliced, and having a huge fall out if one day Mrs Head-banger decides she's now into Gregorian chants, and Charles Head-banger now fancies Rap. Just think of the scene: rows galore, ketchup up the walls, suitcases being packed. Doesn't bear thinking of. Terrible scenes.
    Headphones for the couple.



    After embracing classical music, knowing it's variety, it's complexity and most of all, the inmense number of works and composers to be discovered out there; I don't think I'm moving to any other genre. Today I discovered: Michel Camilo, his piano concerto. A fancy crossover work in classical form, with mixed jazz concepts.

    What piece of classical music have you discovered recently?

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    Senior Member oisfetz's Avatar
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    Edward Franck's string quintets. Romantic, very well written and lovely works by an unjustly forgotten composer. A mail friend has promise to send me the SQs. and the v.c.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Manuel View Post
    What piece of classical music have you discovered recently?
    Not really a work but a disc:

    Franck: piano works by Paul Crossley.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Edward Elgar View Post
    Don't you find that you are willing to sample every type of music, whereas those with a passion for rock or R&B wouldn't even consider listening to a classical peice? It just goes to show which denomination have the most open minds!
    I am a classical man first but also like and did play jazz years ago, I like folk music in general, even blue grass country, do I have the right title?. The only music that makes me leave the room is Rock I just cant stand the outlandish chords played a full volume, and Country and Western which I find monotonous.
    Two of our classical music group like rock they are in the 40 48 age group
    Two like jazz the are in the 65-70 age group, so age could have a bearing on this.
    luckily for me my Wife has the same tastes as I do .

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