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Thread: 3D Sound?

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    Default 3D Sound?


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    Senior Member Ukko's Avatar
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    Default Well, sort of

    Quoted from the article:

    "So how does it work? Conventional stereo recordings already incorporate rich location information, but our ears do not capture it during playback because of what engineers call "crosstalk": the fact that your left ear hears sound from the left speaker but also the right speaker (and vice versa). This explains why stereo recordings don’t recreate dimensionality as accurately as your ears and your brain hear sound in space. The trick is to cancel the crosstalk without altering the sound quality—something no one has ever quite pulled off until now. "

    The reporter thinks this makes sense. It doesn't, as stated. There is a relevant factor, but he doesn't get it.

    The "3D" effect is likely enough, movies already have something similar - those sounds that seem to come from behind you, even when there are no speakers back there.

    I spent a fortune on deodorant before I realized that people don't like me anyway.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hilltroll72 View Post
    Quoted from the article:

    "So how does it work? Conventional stereo recordings already incorporate rich location information, but our ears do not capture it during playback because of what engineers call "crosstalk": the fact that your left ear hears sound from the left speaker but also the right speaker (and vice versa). This explains why stereo recordings don’t recreate dimensionality as accurately as your ears and your brain hear sound in space. The trick is to cancel the crosstalk without altering the sound quality—something no one has ever quite pulled off until now. "

    The reporter thinks this makes sense. It doesn't, as stated. There is a relevant factor, but he doesn't get it.

    The "3D" effect is likely enough, movies already have something similar - those sounds that seem to come from behind you, even when there are no speakers back there.

    I haven't digested it yet. Here's another I've barely eaten, that may or may not aid anyone in rationalizing the first. The Audio Chain.

    http://www.acousticsciences.com/articles/witd.htm

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    Senior Member Kopachris's Avatar
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    I didn't even click the link, but I'm guessing you're talking about binaural recording? The human ear gets position information out of sound based on the difference in time at which a sound reaches each ear. This can be recorded by having each channel be recorded at a distance away from each other similar to the distance between human ears. (Actually, the article is probably about true holophony, or wave-field synthesis, which is a much more complex process and takes interference into account, similar to holography.) Binaural recording, at least, has been used at least a few times. One example would be in the album The Final Cut by Pink Floyd, where binaural recording was used for realistic gravel-crunching and explosion effects.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kopachris View Post
    I didn't even click the link, but I'm guessing you're talking about binaural recording? The human ear gets position information out of sound based on the difference in time at which a sound reaches each ear. This can be recorded by having each channel be recorded at a distance away from each other similar to the distance between human ears. (Actually, the article is probably about true holophony, or wave-field synthesis, which is a much more complex process and takes interference into account, similar to holography.) Binaural recording, at least, has been used at least a few times. One example would be in the album The Final Cut by Pink Floyd, where binaural recording was used for realistic gravel-crunching and explosion effects.
    No, it's pretty basic stuff to a person such as yourself...included in a conference presentation twenty years ago.

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    Furthermore, looking at this topic via Wikipedia "3D audio effect", I see that 3D sound/3D audio is a much over-worked term, and how rolled eyes and yawns could result...such as today's announcement for SRS Wide 3D Sound in LG notebooks.

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