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Thread: The last thing you ate?

  1. #2656
    Senior Member KenOC's Avatar
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    Tomorrow morning, a 10-ounce bone-in pork chop from Mimi's. I have a free entrée coupon, yea!



  2. #2657
    Senior Member KenOC's Avatar
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    Well, the pork chop was a real disappointment. But my wife made hot and sour soup tonight. Plenty of hot peppers and vinegar, strips of boiled pork, a handful of black tree fungus (Chinese: tree ears), bamboo shoots, tofu, an egg, some corn starch, white pepper, soy sauce, some sesame oil, and a bit of sugar -- sprinkled with chopped green onion.

    This is really better than we have found in any restaurants around here. Tremendous! We agreed that the pork really should have more fat – strips of pork belly will do the job next time.
    Last edited by KenOC; Oct-23-2018 at 05:09.


  3. #2658
    Senior Member KenOC's Avatar
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    Mmmm. A Habit Charburger with a side of Sriracha Lime Spicy Green Beans, tempura style, with ranch dressing as a dip. Good!



    Last edited by KenOC; Nov-26-2018 at 05:08.


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  5. #2659
    Senior Member KenOC's Avatar
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    This evening, from our local Pizza 900:

    Grande Edo Siciliana -- Red Sauce, Fresh Mozzarella, spicy salami, pepperoni, Italian sausage, roasted garlic, chili infused olive oil, parmesan cheese, and basil.

    With crushed red pepper, extra parmesan, and cold beers. My, that was good! No pics, sorry.


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  7. #2660
    Senior Member KenOC's Avatar
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    Something new, as 21st-century technology meets good old-fashioned competitive business. I like this, since I enjoy Whoppers!
    -------------------------------------------------------
    Burger King is debuting a McDonald's-themed deal. If customers go within 600 feet of a McDonald's location, they can order a Whopper for one cent via the revamped Burger King app.

    "If a guest is inside one of these geofenced areas and has the new BK App on their device, the app will unlock the Whopper sandwich for a penny promotion," Burger King said in a press release. "Once the 1¢ Whopper sandwich order is placed, the user will be 'detoured' away from McDonald's, as the app navigates them to the nearest Burger King restaurant for pick up."


  8. #2661
    Senior Member ldiat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KenOC View Post
    Well, the pork chop was a real disappointment. But my wife made hot and sour soup tonight. Plenty of hot peppers and vinegar, strips of boiled pork, a handful of black tree fungus (Chinese: tree ears), bamboo shoots, tofu, an egg, some corn starch, white pepper, soy sauce, some sesame oil, and a bit of sugar -- sprinkled with chopped green onion.

    This is really better than we have found in any restaurants around here. Tremendous! We agreed that the pork really should have more fat – strips of pork belly will do the job next time.
    next time you make pork chops. make a "brine" of water salt-sugar. like 1 cup HOH to 1 -2 TBS of salt and sugar. soak the chops for an hour or so. remove-dry and use. make sure the brine is cool or cold.

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  10. #2662
    Senior Member KenOC's Avatar
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    Tonight: Beef French dip sandwiches.

    Beef is a 2-pound brisket roast, bought from the remainder bin for $8.00. Cooked sous vide for 48 hours at 137 Fahrenheit for a medium rare result. Charred with a propane torch. Great taste, tender like prime rib because the extended cooking has gelatinized all the tough connecting tissue.

    The vacuum-sealed bag used to cook the beef will be full of juice cooked out of the beef. Pour off this liquid to a sauce pan and boil. The solids will congeal on the surface. Scrape the solids off as best you can with a large spoon, then strain the remainder into a container through a paper towel pressed into a mesh strainer. Add some store-bought beef stock to the resulting clear liquid plus soy sauce and pepper to taste for the au jus.

    Serve with split baguettes and the au jus in bowls to dip them. We’re having ours with onion rings.


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    Some tasty persimmons

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  14. #2664
    Senior Member elgars ghost's Avatar
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    Going to have Yorkshire pudding with onion gravy later. I love this meal - it's simple to make, filling, delicious and it involves less cleaning up than usual. I cheat with the gravy, though - I use granules and then just add fried onion to the jug.


    For the pudding itself (based on two servings):

    Heat oven to 200 deg. c.

    Put a bit of oil into a large bread/cake tin or skillet so the bottom is covered, then put in oven for about 7 mins.

    Sift c. 100 grams of plain flour into a mixing bowl.

    Vigorously whisk in three eggs until you get a smooth paste. If you are left with a few lumps, don't fret - they should cook out.

    Add sea salt, cracked black pepper and a good dollop of English mustard. Also add some sage if required (the jarred stuff is fine, doesn't need to be fresh).

    Add c. 125 mls of milk incrementally (about a third at a time) to the paste and mix well.

    Take out hot tin/skillet from oven, carefully pour the mixture in and put back into oven for c.20 minutes.

    Turn cooked pudding out onto a dish - it should come straight out without sticking.

    Be a peasant like me and tear chunks off with fingers, using the gravy as a dip.
    '...a violator of his word, a libertine over head and ears in debt and disgrace, a despiser of domestic ties, the companion of gamblers and demireps, a man who has just closed half a century without a single claim on the gratitude of his country or the respect of posterity...' - Leigh Hunt on the Prince Regent (later George IV).

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  16. #2665
    Senior Member KenOC's Avatar
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    I’m on my own this week since my wife’s up north in Seattle taking care of a friend, without family, who has advanced Parkinson’s disease. Mostly eating pre-packaged entrees. But tonight I had frozen breaded shrimp.

    Checked on the Internet for the best way to cook these. I ended up by slopping some peanut oil on them still frozen (for better crispness), sprinkling on some oregano (basil was suggested too, but I couldn’t find any), and baking them in the toaster oven on parchment at 425F for 16 minutes turning them over at the halfway point.

    They came out hot , crispy, and juicy, not at all overcooked. Dipped in a tartar sauce made from Miracle Whip, dill relish, and fresh-squeezed lemon juice. Very tasty!
    Last edited by KenOC; Dec-31-2018 at 06:56.


  17. #2666
    poco a poco
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    Dear KenOC , glad your culinary experiment worked for you. But for me, I cannot abide shrimps or prawns.
    Last edited by poco a poco; Dec-31-2018 at 07:10.

  18. #2667
    Senior Member ldiat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elgars ghost View Post
    Going to have Yorkshire pudding with onion gravy later. I love this meal - it's simple to make, filling, delicious and it involves less cleaning up than usual. I cheat with the gravy, though - I use granules and then just add fried onion to the jug.


    For the pudding itself (based on two servings):

    Heat oven to 200 deg. c.

    Put a bit of oil into a large bread/cake tin or skillet so the bottom is covered, then put in oven for about 7 mins.

    Sift c. 100 grams of plain flour into a mixing bowl.

    Vigorously whisk in three eggs until you get a smooth paste. If you are left with a few lumps, don't fret - they should cook out.

    Add sea salt, cracked black pepper and a good dollop of English mustard. Also add some sage if required (the jarred stuff is fine, doesn't need to be fresh).

    Add c. 125 mls of milk incrementally (about a third at a time) to the paste and mix well.

    Take out hot tin/skillet from oven, carefully pour the mixture in and put back into oven for c.20 minutes.

    Turn cooked pudding out onto a dish - it should come straight out without sticking.

    Be a peasant like me and tear chunks off with fingers, using the gravy as a dip.
    we would save bacon grease and the dripping from the prime ribs. we then use large Muffin pans and pour the batter into the muffin cups w/ the hot grease. the batter would puff up about 6-8 inches above the tins. like pop overs

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  20. #2668
    Senior Member ldiat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KenOC View Post
    I’m on my own this week since my wife’s up north in Seattle taking care of a friend, without family, who has advanced Parkinson’s disease. Mostly eating pre-packaged entrees. But tonight I had frozen breaded shrimp.

    Checked on the Internet for the best way to cook these. I ended up by slopping some peanut oil on them still frozen (for better crispness), sprinkling on some oregano (basil was suggested too, but I couldn’t find any), and baking them in the toaster oven on parchment at 425F for 16 minutes turning them over at the halfway point.

    They came out hot , crispy, and juicy, not at all overcooked. Dipped in a tartar sauce made from Miracle Whip, dill relish, and fresh-squeezed lemon juice. Very tasty!
    you forgot the 'cocktail sauce" ketchup-chili sauce-horseradish-lemon juice

  21. #2669
    Donny Brook
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    Just finished up the last of the holiday haggis (a savoury pudding containing sheep's pluck (heart, liver, and lungs); minced with onion, oatmeal, suet, spices, and salt, mixed with stock, and cooked while traditionally encased in the animal's stomach though now often in an artificial casing instead although always go for the real deal when you can - trust me, there is a noticeable difference) which despite its description is an amazingly tasty dish - wonderful nutty texture with a delicious savoury flavor.


    untitled.jpg

    On January 25th we celebrate the birth of the poet Robert Burns with a "Burns supper" in which haggis is served along with whisky whilst reciting his poetry. He is the author of "Address to a Haggis". I've provided the original text with an idiomatic translation in case you're interested in hosting your very own "Burns supper" - you really should as they're quite a hoot.



    "Address to a Haggis" -

    Fair fa' your honest, sonsie face,
    Great chieftain o' the puddin'-race!
    Aboon them a' ye tak yer place,
    Painch, tripe, or thairm:
    Weel are ye wordy o' a grace
    As lang's my airm.

    (Nice seeing your honest, chubby face,
    Great chieftain of the sausage race!
    Above them all you take your place,
    Belly, tripe, or links:
    Well are you worthy of a grace
    As long as my arm.)

    The groaning trencher there ye fill,
    Your hurdies like a distant hill,
    Your pin wad help to mend a mill
    In time o need,
    While thro your pores the dews distil
    Like amber bead.

    (The groaning platter there you fill,
    Your buttocks like a distant hill,
    Your pin would help to mend a mill
    In time of need,
    While through your pores the dews distill
    Like amber bead.)

    His knife see rustic Labour dicht,
    An cut you up wi ready slicht,
    Trenching your gushing entrails bricht,
    Like onie ditch;
    And then, Oh what a glorious sicht,
    Warm-reekin, rich!

    (His knife see rustic Labour sharpen,
    And cut you up with practiced skill,
    Trenching your gushing entrails bright,
    Like any ditch;
    And then, Oh what a glorious sight,
    Warm-steaming, rich!)

    Then, horn for horn, they stretch an strive:
    Deil tak the hindmaist, on they drive,
    Till a' their weel-swall'd kytes belyve
    Are bent like drums;
    Then auld Guidman, maist like to rive,
    'Bethankit' hums.


    (Then, spoon for spoon, they stretch and strive:
    Devil take the hindmost, on they drive,
    'Til all their well-swollen bellies soon
    Are tight as drums;
    Then old Master, most likely to burst,
    'Thanks Be' hums.)

    Is there that ower his French ragout,
    Or olio that wad staw a sow,
    Or fricassee wad mak her spew
    Wi perfect scunner,
    Looks down wi' sneering, scornfu view
    On sic a dinner?

    (Is there one, that over his French ragout,
    Or olio that would give pause to a sow,
    Or fricassee that would make her spew
    With perfect loathing,
    Looks down with sneering, scornful view
    On such a dinner?)

    Poor devil! see him ower his trash,
    As feckless as a wither'd rash,
    His spindle shank a guid whip-lash,
    His nieve a nit:
    Thro bloody flood or field to dash,
    Oh how unfit!

    (Poor devil! See him over his trash,
    As feeble as a withered rush,
    His spindly leg a good whip-lash,
    His fist a nit:
    Through bloody flood or field to dash,
    Oh how unfit!)

    But mark the Rustic, haggis-fed,
    The trembling earth resounds his tread,
    Clap in his wallie nieve a blade,
    He'll make it whissle;
    An legs an arms, an heads will sned,
    Like taps o thrissle.


    (But mark the Rustic, haggis-fed,
    The trembling earth resounds his tread,
    Clap in his sturdy fist a blade,
    He'll make it whistle;
    And legs and arms, and heads will cut,
    Like tops of thistle.)

    Ye Pow'rs, wha mak mankind your care,
    And dish them out their bill o fare,
    Auld Scotland wants nae skinking ware
    That jaups in luggies:
    But, if Ye wish her gratefu prayer,
    Gie her a Haggis!

    (You Pow'rs, that make mankind your care,
    And dish them out their bill of fare,
    Old Scotland wants no watery ware
    That slops in bowls:
    But, if You wish her grateful prayer,
    Give her a Haggis!)

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  23. #2670
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    I just ate some crackers with peanut butter for breakfast. I'm a culinary institute

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