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Thread: Why do I like Bach, but not Mozart or Beethoven?

  1. #76
    Senior Member Meaghan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Llyranor View Post

    The sinfonia concertante for violin & viola is still my favorite Mozart composition by far. I suggest listening to at least the first 3 min and see if it does anything for you! I love the dialogue between the violin and viola, and the way the orchestra takes over at 2:26ish just melts my heart somehow. Love this piece.
    [yt]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-PEGm3R4dtU[/yt]
    It might be my favorite Mozart works as well! And this movement gets me every time.

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    Senior Member Argus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaptainAzure View Post
    Five stiff little digits should be administered to the side of your head squire.
    That'd be preferable to having to listen to any Mozart.

    Actually, that's quite a good analogy for the effect Mozart's music has on me, except rather than a nice firm punch to the temple, it's more like a limp wristed slap to the cheek from an Alan Carr-type of fellow.

    I am going to be quite forthright here and say that if you do not care for Mozart then you shouldn't be here in fact to say you don't like Mozart suggests that you should have difficulty opening doors and keeping your tongue from hanging from your jowels as you must have suffered some serious head trauma.

    I do not trust a man who says he does not care for Mozart. It can only mean two things. Either he is a liar or wishes to be odiously controversial for the sake of it.
    Such a man has no defense.
    Are all Mozart fans this open-minded?

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    Member CaptainAzure's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Llyranor View Post

    The sinfonia concertante for violin & viola is still my favorite Mozart composition by far. I suggest listening to at least the first 3 min and see if it does anything for you! I love the dialogue between the violin and viola, and the way the orchestra takes over at 2:26ish just melts my heart somehow. Love this piece.
    [yt]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-PEGm3R4dtU[/yt]
    The first movement is going to be played at my future wedding. Absolute perfection.

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    Senior Member Meaghan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Argus View Post
    Are all Mozart fans this open-minded?
    Oh, absolutely.

    (I like Mozart and I like Saariaho and others may dislike them as they please.)

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    Member CaptainAzure's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Meaghan View Post

    (I like Mozart and I like Saariaho and others may dislike them as they please.)
    No they may -bloody- not

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    Senior Member regressivetransphobe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicola View Post
    It seems to me that this thread so far has been virtually a complete waste of time because it has gone off at a tangent to the OP. The original question asked was:

    All we've had so far is the highly predictable but also highly irrelevant comment from the usual quarters that it's OK to dislike any or all of these composers, and that anyone who argues differently is a snob.

    This kind of response is totally irrelevant to the OP because it doesn't deal with the specific question raised namely why it might be that someone likes Bach but not Mozart or Beethoven.

    The question wasn't "Is it OK among snobbish circles that I don't like Mozart and Beethoven, and if it is not OK what can I say to these people to reduce my embarrassment". And yet this is the question that most people seem to assume was asked. Read the question again, and you will see that you have been barking up the wrong tree.

    To the OP the only answer that I can give to the actual question posed is that I haven't a clue why you don't like Mozart and Beethoven, but maybe you haven't yet heard enough of their works. Beyond that, I cannot account for your tastes, and nor can anyone else. I'm afraid that your attempted explanations have not clarified the problems you have experienced, at least not to me. Possibly if you give it a few more years you may change your mind, as most people do. If not, don't worry about it because there are certainly far more important things in life to worry about than this mere triviality.

    As for all the answers and comments given on the question that wasn't raised, but which these people like to talk about nevertheless, I can only suggest they get a life, instead of coming on here on lecturing the rest of us on how much they dislike Mozart, and how it is their right to do so, all of which is utterly boring and quite pathetic.
    highly predictable but also highly irrelevant comment from the uuuuusual quarters

    utterly boring and quite pathetic

    I can only suggest they get a life

    attempted explanations


    *Monocle pops off*

    Take a chill pill, daddy-o. You're the only one who seems upset in this thread.
    People who hide are afraid!

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  11. #82
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    No offense to Mozart or Beethoven, but I'm kind of relieved that some people share the same feelings as mine.

    I learnt piano when I was young and couldn't bring myself to really love classical music (except Bach) because a lot of the pieces my teacher chose for me were from Mozart, Beethoven, Chopin, Schumann, Liszt etc. Now I don't play music anymore but youtube has exposed me to the beaty of music. A lot of Italian composers really touch my heart - Vivaldi, Corelli, Albinoni, Locatelli, Marcello, and non-Italians too like JM Leclair and Purcell.

    As for as I know Italian Baroque had had some influence on Bach and that Baroque actully spread from Italy to Germany. There are great classical and romantic pieces too but imho nothing is quite like the intriguing soul-striking depth and complexity of baroque music.
    Last edited by Pemberlean; Sep-23-2011 at 18:26.

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  13. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by TxllxT View Post
    I think, that first one should answer the question within the Bach family: do you like Johann Sebastian but not his sons? From Johann Christoph (who already turned 'classical' be it on the bright side) you get quickly the link to Mozart.
    I like CPE Bach, but not JC Bach, Mozart nor Beethoven - I know I am very silly and prejudiced... one of the reasons for my dislike is their religious stance. JC Bach and Mozart are well known freemasons while Beethoven is thought to be one. This may have nothing to do with their music but in my ideation art (be it music, literature or painting) has to be an expression of what one believes in...

    Hope I won't start an unpleasant argument here... just ignore me if you're offended
    Last edited by Pemberlean; Sep-23-2011 at 18:55.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pemberlean View Post
    I like CPE Bach, but not JC Bach, Mozart nor Beethoven - I know I am very silly and prejudiced... one of the reasons for my dislike is their religious stance. JC Bach and Mozart are well known freemasons while Beethoven is thought to be one. This may have nothing to do with their music but in my ideation art (be it music, literature or painting) has to be an expression of what one believes in...

    Hope I won't start an unpleasant argument here... just ignore me if you're offended
    I, for one, am not offended but I am perplexed as to how you decide to dislike a composer based on their religious stance. I mean, this is even worse than my prejudices against Mozart and Beethoven (they didn't write enough fugues). I'm also wondering whether you're one of those conspiracy theorists who think freemasonry is about devil worshipping and secretly controlling the world. I really hope you'd tell me that that's not the case here.
    Last edited by HerlockSholmes; Sep-24-2011 at 04:37.

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    Senior Member Ravellian's Avatar
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    People generally don't like what they don't understand, most of the time because they don't have enough exposure. Mozart and Beethoven are not particularly difficult composers, but they are very different from Bach. I would suggest listening to their best known works. This web page gives good approximations for top 10 best known/greatest works per composer: http://digitaldreamdoor.com/pages/be...sic-top10.html

    So, in the Mozart list, we have:
    1. Don Giovanni
    2. Le Nozze di Figaro
    3. Symphony No. 41 in C major "Jupiter"
    4. Piano Concerto No. 20 in D minor
    5. Symphony No. 40 in G minor
    6. Clarinet Quintet in A major
    7. String Quintet No. 4 in G minor, K516
    8. Die Zauberflote
    9. Piano Concerto No. 21 in C major
    10. Piano Concerto No. 24 in C minor

    Not a bad list. I suggest listening to some of these works and then telling us if you still don't like Mozart.
    Man is an intelligence in servitude to his organs.

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    Senior Member HarpsichordConcerto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pemberlean View Post
    I like CPE Bach, but not JC Bach, Mozart nor Beethoven - I know I am very silly and prejudiced... one of the reasons for my dislike is their religious stance. JC Bach and Mozart are well known freemasons while Beethoven is thought to be one. This may have nothing to do with their music but in my ideation art (be it music, literature or painting) has to be an expression of what one believes in...
    Hope I won't start an unpleasant argument here... just ignore me if you're offended
    Well, just listen to the pieces as they come to your senses wihout imbuing them with personal philosophical beliefs from our modern times over these works that are centuries old. That might help, and reading a book about these composers to understand their times and idiom do help a lot too.

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    Interesting, on THIS list of famous Freemasons throughout history on Wikipedia, a number of composers/musicians come up, some that stuck out for me were Brahms, Duke Ellington, Thomas Arne & Irving Berlin. I'm not sure of how accurate this list is, or how long they were active as Freemasons, or in what way, but if you begin to blank out composers because of them being Freemasons, you may well find out that many of your favourites were of that persuasion at some point in their lives (I personally am more troubled by Wagner's avowed anti-Semitism, but it doesn't mean that I can't enjoy his music to some degree)...

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    Senior Member graaf's Avatar
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    I don't really care for Wagner's antisemitism, for at least two reasons: 1) In XIX century Europe antisemitism was very widespread, and no one cared much about it until the whole thing went out of control and culminated with Holocaust, 2) his antisemitism was amplified by Hitler's worship of him. When I listen to Wagner, I don't hear anything antisemitic, but maybe I'm missing out on something.

    If I had to denounce everyone who lived back then and wasn't politically correct by today's standards, especially not correct towards Jewish people, I would have to eliminate almost everybody who ever made a comment about other nation. It's easy to get many quotes about Jews via google, and see how many famous people (and still respected today) were antisemitic.

    On the matter of religion, all my favourite composers can easily be converts to Shamanism for all I care, as long as they can bring themselves to spit out decent Requiem or a Mass (not that those are my favourite musical forms, but there are great ones out there).

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  23. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by graaf View Post
    ...If I had to denounce everyone who lived back then and wasn't politically correct by today's standards, especially not correct towards Jewish people, I would have to eliminate almost everybody who ever made a comment about other nation. It's easy to get many quotes about Jews via google, and see how many famous people (and still respected today) were antisemitic...
    What I'd add to that is that composers were just humans like the rest of us. They're not gods, they're just human. Of course, my regard for those musicians who were also humanitarians - eg. Pablo Casals - is very high in all aspects, not just in terms of the music they made. But Casals simply shows one side of the coin compared to the other side, eg. Wagner & others. A teacher of mine at high school loved the music of Wagner - she was what could be described as a Wagnerite - but said that she couldn't help thinking when listening to his music in it's more strident moments that it was like the soundtrack to the invasion of Poland - which it most likely was on those ancient newsreels & propaganda films. So you're right, our opinion of Wagner's politics is strongly coloured by what happened in the second world war, Holocaust, etc...

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  25. #90
    Senior Member regressivetransphobe's Avatar
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    Something people tend to forget when they talk about Wagner: artists are total ****s. All of them, forever.
    People who hide are afraid!

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