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Thread: Favorite director on Dvd

  1. #61
    Senior Member amfortas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by World Violist View Post
    Any Ring staging I've found I dislike, but that's not aimed at any particular director...I don't think I have a director that I dislike yet. I've had luck in not finding Eurotrash etc. in my few DVD's.
    Maybe that's a positive reflection on you.

    I like to think that "Eurotrash" is in the eye of the beholder. Sure, plenty of productions may deserve such condemnation, but it just seems a little too easy to throw the word around in general dismissal. Why not try a little harder to understand each staging on its own terms? Hans Sachs said it best:

    Wollt ihr nach Regeln messen,
    was nicht nach eurer Regeln Lauf,
    der eignen Spur vergessen,
    sucht davon erst die Regeln auf!

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  3. #62
    Senior Member amfortas's Avatar
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    Werner Herzog, a leader of the New German cinema movement, was also noted for beautiful (though surprisingly conservative) opera productions--the best known probably being his snowy, smokey, laser-lit Bayreuth Lohengrin.

    Last edited by amfortas; Jul-23-2011 at 17:50.

  4. #63
    Senior Member amfortas's Avatar
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    Peter Konwitschny, another German, is an idiosyncratic, often puzzling director. He did the infamous, wildly uneven "yellow sofa" Tristan (which nonetheless had some very effective moments), a Lohengrin rather arbitrarily set among schoolchildren, and a heavily debunked Gotterdammerung as the last installment of the multi-director Stuttgart Ring. Not everyone's cup of tea, and for the most part not mine.


  5. #64
    Senior Member Almaviva's Avatar
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    amfortas, your command of the stage directing scene is formidable. You made of this thread a mini Opera In-Depth one! Bravo! I'll be sure to ask for your advice on stage directing when I plan my next DVD purchases!
    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

  6. #65
    Senior Member amfortas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Almaviva View Post
    amfortas, your command of the stage directing scene is formidable. You made of this thread a mini Opera In-Depth one! Bravo! I'll be sure to ask for your advice on stage directing when I plan my next DVD purchases!
    I appreciate the thought. But since tastes vary so much, be sure to get plenty of other opinions too. I've had some very interesting conversations with mamascarlatti about directors and recent productions, so I know she for one is a formidable resource as well. I really enjoy being part of such an enthusiastic community of opera lovers.
    Last edited by amfortas; Jul-23-2011 at 18:27.

  7. #66
    Senior Member Almaviva's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by amfortas View Post
    I appreciate the thought. But since tastes vary so much, be sure to get plenty of other opinions as well. I've had some very interesting conversations with mamascarlatti about directors and recent productions, so I know she for one is a formidable resource as well. I really enjoy being part of such an enthusiastic community of opera lovers.
    You mean that nanascarleppi person who is an agent in disguise for the MetPlayer fundraising effort? I'm not sure if he/she is reliable, with all those kickbacks he/she gets from forcing people into unreasonable purchases and subscriptions. That nanascarleppi person is evil, I'm telling ya. He/she is in great part responsible for great financial hardship imposed upon my poor family thanks to my huge UWP. You go just ahead and listen to him/her and you'll see the size of the hole you'll be getting yourself into. Then, don't say I didn't warn you.

    "J'ai dit qu'il ne suffisait pas d'entendre la musique, mais qu'il fallait encore la voir" (Stravinsky)

  8. #67
    Senior Member amfortas's Avatar
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    David Alden, an American director who has done extensive work for the English National Opera and the Bavarian State Opera, is known for eclectic, unsettling stagings. His DVD catalog includes a nightmarish Tannhauser, a couple of highly tongue-in-cheek Handels, and his TV adaptation of his own staging of Thomas Adès's Powder Her Face.


  9. #68
    Moderator mamascarlatti's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by amfortas View Post
    Petr Weigl is best known for his powerful filmed versions of operas.

    That Eugene Onegin is very beautiful, but he used actors to lip synch to an old recording and made some cuts. The actor playing Onegin is rather blank in it too, all tight breeches and Prince Regent hair and little else.
    Natalie

  10. #69
    Moderator mamascarlatti's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by amfortas View Post
    Werner Herzog, a leader of the New German cinema movement, was also noted for beautiful (though surprisingly conservative) opera productions--the best known probably being his snowy, smokey, laser-lit Bayreuth Lohengrin.

    Ah yes, the Neanderthal-themed Donna del Lago. At least I thought it was, hard to see because the lighting was so dim. I'm surprised his direction was so dull actually, when you think of his films.
    Natalie

  11. #70
    Moderator mamascarlatti's Avatar
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    Francesco Negrin works mainly it seems at the Liceu or the Royal Danish. These are the DVDs by him I have in my collection:

    This is his most succesful one, as it effectively conveys the fantastic and pastoral elements of the piece:



    An inoffensive and visually attractive Norma (It's the singing I don't enjoy much here)



    A "military fatigues" Giulio Cesare, with some rather flat jokes about Cleopatra's hair (Cesare keeps banging on about the beauty of her "crin", and Cleopatra wears a series of increasingly tatty wigs and ends up bald). Cast in the shadow by Glyndebourne.



    I found his light-hearted touch worked well with this, and the "battle scene" had me in stitches, although I know it's too silly for some.

    Last edited by mamascarlatti; Jul-23-2011 at 23:20. Reason: typo
    Natalie

  12. #71
    Moderator mamascarlatti's Avatar
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    It's hard to categorise the work of Gilbert Deflo, except to say that he seems to study each work and bring out its inner character.

    This brought us as faithfully as possible to the original L'Orfeo, with even Savall the conductor being a dead ringer for Monteverdi



    This lively production explores the commedia dell'arte origins of the piece:



    And this is a straight telling of the story. I thought the direction of the old countess's reminscings and eventual death, and the final scene were excellent.

    Last edited by mamascarlatti; Jul-23-2011 at 21:43.
    Natalie

  13. #72
    Moderator mamascarlatti's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by amfortas View Post
    David Alden, an American director who has done extensive work for the English National Opera and the Bavarian State Opera, is known for eclectic, unsettling stagings. His DVD catalog includes a nightmarish Tannhauser, a couple of highly tongue-in-cheek Handels, and his TV adaptation of his own staging of Thomas Adès's Powder Her Face.
    I'm presuming you mean my most hated DVD of all times, this ridiculous travesty designed to show nothing but the fact that the director once spent some time in a second rate hotel in Tel Aviv:



    Don't buy it! Don't buy it! Don't buy it!
    Natalie

  14. #73
    Moderator mamascarlatti's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by amfortas View Post
    Götz Friedrich's work still holds up very well, with his two definitive Strauss films and such stage successes as his Bayreuth Tannhauser.

    Yes, fantastic disturbing films.

    I'll add a moving Manon Lescaut and a straight but evocative telling of Meistersinger:

    Natalie

  15. #74
    Moderator mamascarlatti's Avatar
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    Andrea Andermann is reponsible for the "live in the original locations" project, a formidable technical undertaking judging from the "making of" interviews. Our Annie has met him in Mantova when she went to visit the house where "Rigoletto a Mantova" was filmed.



    Natalie

  16. #75
    Moderator mamascarlatti's Avatar
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    I'm fond of Adrian Noble's work,



    particularly the Monteverdi, which has some stunning staging. I particularly love the arrival of Minerva and Telemaco, the recognition scene, and the killing of the suitors which is managed very well with puppets.
    Natalie

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