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Thread: Keyboard vs. piano

  1. #31
    Member Azathoth's Avatar
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    It can be one of humanity's worst diseases and still make a lot of cool sounds.
    Weep not for little Leonie,
    Abducted by a French marquis!
    Though loss of honor was a wrench
    Just think how it's improved her French.

  2. #32
    Senior Member Morigan's Avatar
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    I'm wondering, why can't they invent some kind of keyboard with heavy keys similar to those of a piano? It shouldn't be that hard, reall.

  3. #33
    Senior Member zlya's Avatar
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    Well, Morigan, they've tried to do this. It's called "weighted action", and most professional quality keyboards have it. However they've found that it is, in fact, extremely hard to emulate not just the feel of a keyboard but also the timbrel response to different keystrikes. With a mechanical action you can change the sound of the note by hitting the key in a different way. It's not like pushing a button, there are thousands of little nuances transferred from the key through the action to the hammer to the string. With a keyboard, you actually are just hitting a button. To make it accurately mimic piano action, you'd need sensors to determine the nuances of the touch, thousands of calculations to determine the exact resultant sound, and thousands upon thousands of sampled sounds to accommodate every possible keystroke. Seems it actually IS that hard, really.

  4. #34
    Notserp89m
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    Okay, have an old piano that is falling out of tune and keys are sticking. Let's just say i would rather pay a good sum of money to keep that old clunker than play and the most expensive electric piano. There is something about the way the keys hit and the vibrations you can feel coming from the piano. And if you have been playing long enough on a real piano it almost hurts to play any imitation. You might also experience the pain of having a note get louder or softer while holding it down.

    BUT!!!!

    For a one year old i would go for the fairly cheap keyboard in expectations to buy i piano. If the kid plays on the piano and tries to play without your intervention (playing not sporadic bangs) then you can expect a long term piano student and defiantly go for the PIANO, the real one.

    Hope this helps and sorry that i have a predisposition against keyboards, i just really dislike them.

  5. #35
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    Piano's and Keyboards are two completely different instruments. You have to understand that a piano can produce different sounds on one note. One way you can varie the sound on a piano is using flat fingers or arm weight giving a mellow, as opposed to sharp, sound.

    Keyboards are VERY useful for composing and I have a CASIO WK-3700 keyboard for that reason, but i would never practise on it. I practise on a YAMAHA U1 PIANO.

    It is impossible to get the touch and detail needed in piano pieces on a keyboard

  6. #36
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    I just started learning Piano on a Casio Keyboard. I can play pretty well, but I notice I also hang my wrists while playing. Is there a website that tells the proper way to position your hands while playing?

    I dont really like the sound of the Piano, Harpsichord or Clavichord on the Keyboard but I cant afford a real Piano.

  7. #37
    Administrator Krummhorn's Avatar
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    Hi toejamfootball (small world, ehh?)

    Check this site out: Understanding Piano Technique written by a Ken Foster. Pretty helpful hints.

    Good luck persuing piano.
    Kh
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  8. #38
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    Becky,

    I presently teach 25 children in private lessons. The children that play on cheap low level keyboards present to me cheap low level learning. Its seems they view it as a toy and lessons as a game. Stay with what other members said with the higher level brands of Dit Pianos. Of course your going to run into if I'm going to spend $1500-2000 on a ditigal why not get a used upright. I tell my families if they want a piece of nice furniture then go with an upright, if your want to move the thing around the house o with a good sound ditigal. Regarding technique I found it easies going from a real Piano to synthesizers. Did I overdrive the synths for a while until I got use to them. Key is I still have the strength and technique to play the acoustic piano.

  9. #39
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    Default cheaper

    i agree with mr waltz. A keyboard is cheaper than a real piano but it has some disadvantages. The keys are softer than the piano so your child will not be able to practice dynamics the way he can practice in a piano. There are cheap pianos anywhere. Try second hand.

  10. #40
    Senior Member Mark Harwood's Avatar
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    A keyboard is no substitute for a piano. The feel is very different, and it does different things. On the other hand, a good digital piano can be very satisfactory. My wife Carol's Roland HP7e is excellent, and the headphone option is useful. The keys have a mechanism that reproduces the feel of a "real" piano well. No tuning or maintenance either, but the re-sale value won't be much.
    One thing it doesn't do, though: if you hold down a chord silently with one hand and play a chord with the other then release it, the held silent chord does not resonate like open strings would. It's a relatively rarely-used effect, and maybe more modern models do it.
    So, for a starter instrument, I'd look for a second-hand Roland digital piano, along with a high-quality pair of headphones (we use Grado SR60), which will sound excellent even with a low-end model.
    Last edited by Mark Harwood; Oct-12-2007 at 11:49. Reason: Afterthought.
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  11. #41
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    Aren't they like... the SAME THING?
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  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beethoven View Post
    Aren't they like... the SAME THING?
    You should start by reading all the posts in this thread. Excepting the #41, which I find a bit inconsistent (but that is just my personal view)

  13. #43
    Junior Member Pianoforte's Avatar
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    Its interesting that Becky started this thread 3 years ago so by now her children could potentially be playing all the greats

    There is no substitute for a real Piano. Its size, shape and inviting keyboard make it a much better option. I first fell in love with the Piano when I was 8 and I saw one at my grandparents house. I found it very mysterious but inviting. There are some very good (but expensive) keyboards that can mimic a Piano but will never be able to replicate the dynamics from a real Piano. My keyboard is velocity sensitive with after touch and although I can play with some emotion it still only has 3 areas of pressure meaning I can only play very soft, normal, or very hard. A Piano of course isn't limited in this way. The keys are also very light so a beginner would never be able to strenghten their fingers which is needed to play a Piano. Even keyboards with weighted, hammer action keys feel a bit fake and 'plonky' and the important damper and sustain pedals wont function in exactly the same way because its done electronically.

    A child could soon grow bored of a keyboard or spend their time fooling around with the buttons and flashing lights rather than spending time on learning to play.

    Pianos are very cheep and sometimes free in classified ads but the problem can be moving them and finding space to keep them. Once in place though they become part of the family and will be a source of fascination, wonder and comfort to the children of the house all through their all important childhood and teenage years. Even if they don't fall in love with the Piano (which of course can't be forced) it will hopefully introduce them to musical instruments in general and then theres bound to be something they want to learn.


  14. #44
    Notserp89m
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    Beethoven- It's the difference between a driving simulator and really driving. You can get the idea of how to drive but it's just not the same.

  15. #45
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    I have an electric piano that has a few vioces, metronome, and different sound settings, and it has weighted keys. I wish that my grandparents had not bought this one though; they got it at Costco, a Behringer CDP 1000 because it was about $500. I want something that feels more like an upright or grand piano. I go to my friend, who has a grand piano at her house, and play on her piano, and the difference is awful to me, same with other upright and grand pianos, the difference in feel is just too big for me to stand. but, unfortunately, we don't have the money.

    There's my little rant.

    Um, I think that to start off with, an electric keyboard is fine, but depending on how quickly they progress, a better piano would be in order soon. Like me, I'm at the top levels of my lesson books and have been playing for under a year, and I'm already wanting a new piano, but that's just me (I'm picky like that, guess that's what I get for playing oboe and being pretty good at it )

    At least you have some time to figure it out. My grandparents just got this one on an impulse because it was cheap. I would rather have waited with my 76-key electric keyboard for another month or two to get a better piano. They are now saying that even if we had the money, an upright wouldn't fit in the same space as my digital (which has 88 keys). that's kinda crazy.


    (sorry for ranting )
    Hope that helps


    worse with my situation is the money, and the lack of understanding from the rest of my family. I'm the only one who is a serious musician (the only other musical person is my bro. on guitar), and I'm the only one who knows what it feels like to switch from a "weighted key" digital keyboard to a real piano. the grandparents were like "at least it's something for you to learn on" but to me, it's not a good substitute for me to learn on.


    In short, get them a keyboard to start out with, and if they seem to really enjoy it and want to stick with it, buy them a real piano, not a digital weighted-key keyboard.

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