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Thread: Revolutionary Etude-A lesson guide

  1. #1
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    I've a FULL recording done years ago as an encore. The sound quality is not very good, but is definately worth listening to.
    The lesson plan will be posted in the next few days. So, enjoy.
    http://www.soundclick.com/bands/7/ytanddwmusic.htm

  2. #2
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    I will listen to that recording as soon as I get the chance. I don't think I've heard the Revolutionary Etude, but I like a few of his other ones. Didn't Chopin write the etudes for his students, as lessons?

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    Senior Member Harvey's Avatar
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    Don't forget about this. I'm really looking forward to it.
    IF I hit a wrong key its becaus i kind of like it that way.

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    Senior Member oistrach13's Avatar
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    oh my GOD , you played that? Brava! wonderful

    sounds so difficult :blink:

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    Thanks for the positive comments.
    I had a lesson plan for this in another forum, but it got deleted...

    I'm soooo lazy nowadays...low energy, don't know why.
    Anyway, here's a summary:
    * The trick in playing running passages neatly is to work in sequential fingering and subdividing notes into( in this case,) groups of four.
    * Then, after able to play neatly, but slowly, the trick to speeding up is to isolate( with yr inner ear and perception of sound ) all other notes, leaving behind the main notes only. ? Sounds confusing... Now look at yr scores, look at the starting cascade... Here are yr notes:
    Aflat G, F D Eflat D, B G Aflat G, F D Eflat D, B G Aflat G...
    Now u still play em all, but think or rather hear them as A flat, F, B, F, B etc... Listen to only the first notes or rather the main notes of these small groups of four. And you'll find it miraculously easy to speed up these running semiquavers.
    * Use the same method for the LH sweeping arpeggios in the middle portion and throughout.
    * But remember not to take the LH as a technical ex, which otherwise will detoriate the already awkard LH passages.
    After u've done the sequential fingering, play em hell fast, then it's time to work on the tonal aspects. Think of them as small waves, and hear only the parental chord when playing, not each and every distinct note of the whole 2 bars arpeggios structure itself. Eventually the fingers will potray what your ears hear and what your heart follows.

    What about u guys? Any interesting tips to share? I certainly can pick up a few useful hints myself. My violin playing has detoriated sooo much.

    BTW, this is another small passage whose intension was to demostrate the flexibility of sequential fingering and speeding up with division of notes. This is really short, but nevertheless interesting. It's a scalic cascade, which eventually built up to a small section close.
    Beethoven, 6 Variation in F, final section close.
    http://www.soundclick.com/bands/7/ytanddwmusic.htm

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    Senior Member Harvey's Avatar
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    OK...I got out the score...here's what I have to say.

    You must remember that the RIGHT hand is the important thing. It may not seem like it at first, but the right hand is more difficult.

    Heed the accents, not so much on the left hand as the right hand because that would make the left hand sound less legato (assuming that's what you're aiming for.)

    On places like the second half of measure 2, where there are alternating fourths, it helps to rotate your wrist instead of using your fingers.

    Ok...from measure 9, even though it says forte you must start at pp, then get this "swelling" thing going on. The left hand moves in and out of the picture. You don't want the audience to say "Man that left hand is really annoying."

    For the pedaling, I suggest you pedal according to the phrasing.
    IF I hit a wrong key its becaus i kind of like it that way.

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    Senior Member Daniel's Avatar
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    As I played this piece, I felt the left hand was more difficult, to get the speed, of course some rythme is tricky in the right hand, but I guess my left hand wasn't trained enough to that time...

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    No, Daniel, yr right. Thr RH is easy...it's the LH that's difficult. And welding em together without the LH spilling over requires tremendous effort.
    Ultimately the LH has to sound at ease, unimportant, while the RH takes the lead, and is definately more percussive.

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    Senior Member Harvey's Avatar
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    Ok, but when I play it I think about the right hand more than the left (most of the time). To me, the left hand motions are very natural, but the right hand takes lots of concentration.
    IF I hit a wrong key its becaus i kind of like it that way.

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    Senior Member Daniel's Avatar
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    You must have a strong left hand! Anyway I think difficulties are individual for everyone.

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    Ok, but when I play it I think about the right hand more than the left (most of the time). To me, the left hand motions are very natural, but the right hand takes lots of concentration.
    That happens when you no longer need to sweat over the LH.
    But generally, running arpeggios always kill me...I've quite a small hand for a pianist...And I always envy pianists who can play Chopin's No 1. with ease. U can work on the RH of that etude...u'll get it. But it'll not sound as natural and convincing as those with big strong hands with good shape. A good hand shape is important when u playing running arppegios, dim 7ths and etc. It'll make things easier and u end up with lesser false notes. It aids in accuracy. Do u have big hands or long fingers Harvey?

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    Senior Member Harvey's Avatar
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    Do u have big hands or long fingers Harvey?
    No way...Chopin's first Etude? I tried it. I 仆街'd. Maybe I'll try again some day.
    IF I hit a wrong key its becaus i kind of like it that way.

  13. #13
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    I have played it, the left hand isn't hard. I just follow up the fingering an it dit helped me a lot. But to syncronized both left and right hand is the hard one....

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