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Thread: Today I discovered...

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    Default Today I discovered...

    What about a place to comment works you are listening for the first time?
    Feel free to list everything, not only the obscure ones.


    Today I discovered Guitar concerto Op. 99 by Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco. I had it in my shelves for a few years, but never heard it (it stick to the other work in the disc: Concierto de Aranjuez). The local orchestra is playing it next friday, so I wanted to get acquainted with the work.

    I'm also presenting myself slowly to Debussy's Preludes.

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    I was struck by a classical shopping mania the other day, and have gotten myself a couple of CDs, most pieces of which I'm listening for the first time in my life. Right now I'm listening to Dvorák's 9th symphony, "the New World". Symphony no. 8 was also on the CD, but I didn't get so well into it on the first listen. However, I kind of like the 9th. I was surprised to notice a similarity in the second movement to Howard Shore's LotR fellowship theme. The clarinet plays a very similar passage repeatedly in this movement. Also, I can't help getting a feeling of the Wild West from some phrases. Oh, now I got to the last movement. The beginning is already familiar sounding as Rhapsody of Fire (the italian powermetal band) included excerpts from this movement in one of their songs. All in all, I can say I have enjoyed especially this 9th symphony from Dvorák. It may be that I need to give the 8th a few more listens before I get into it. I can easily see why the 9th is such a popular work. The final movement is very nice and catchy, especially the theme with the horns.

    Another new discovery for me was Sibelius' 1st and 3rd symphonies. They sound remarkably similar to modern film music. His music is very colourful, deep, and a bit solemn, too. It's a shame I haven't listened to Sibelius before even though I'm a finn myself. If I had to compare Dvorák and Sibelius, I'd say Sibelius was a bit more accessible to me (myself being a film-music guy). And the Sibelius CD was a very good deal, costing only 4.50€ and containing symphonies nos. 1 & 3 plus Finlandia. Also the quality of the recording is very good.

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    Quote Originally Posted by crimson View Post
    I was struck by a classical shopping mania the other day, and have gotten myself a couple of CDs, most pieces of which I'm listening for the first time in my life. Right now I'm listening to Dvorák's 9th symphony, "the New World". Symphony no. 8 was also on the CD, but I didn't get so well into it on the first listen.
    An excellent purchase I can tell. Dvorak will provide you with a lot of enjoyment. His late symphonies are magnificent. Give the 8th some time, and you will definitely surrender to its magic.


    Quote Originally Posted by crimson View Post
    However, I kind of like the 9th. I was surprised to notice a similarity in the second movement to Howard Shore's LotR fellowship theme. The clarinet plays a very similar passage repeatedly in this movement.
    The main solo of the movement is played by the english horn. Is that what you mean?


    Quote Originally Posted by crimson View Post
    Another new discovery for me was Sibelius' 1st and 3rd symphonies. They sound remarkably similar to modern film music.
    Oh no... This sentence will drive Kurkikohtaus mad...

    ***

    I've just finished Messiaen's Des canyons aux etoiles and I'm still in shock.
    The recording is from 2004 BBC Proms.

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    Senior Member Morigan's Avatar
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    I discovered four works at a concert yesterday... I can't say they were great discoveries.

    First, Berlioz's "Le Corsaire" overture. Not bad actually. The fact that it's very seldom played tells it all. Then there was a "Concerto for english horn AND oboe" (the soloist had to switch between instruments as he played!). This concerto was a composition from a local composer whom I don't really appreciate (Jacques Hétu). Overall, it sounded like the soundtrack to a mediocre movie.

    I was surprised by a piece for orchestra called "Ronde villageoise" by another local composer, Clermont Pépin. It was actually a very boisterous single-movement dance-like tune reminiscent of a village festival from the olde tymes.

    The last work played was César Franck's symphony. The booklet said it was probably the best symphony composed in France in the second half of the 19th century... Give me Saint-Saëns anytime!! Still, it was a very enjoyable symphony, I found.

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    The main solo of the movement is played by the english horn. Is that what you mean?
    I think that's it. On my version it (the english horn) comes right after the brass in the beginning. It's not totally the same as the fellowship (or the hobbits/shire) theme but somehow it reminded me of it. I think the beginning of the english horn part uses even the same notes as the fellowship theme in LotR. It doesn't trouble me that they're similar. I love the fellowship theme very much. And it's not like they're excactly the same.

    Oh no... This sentence will drive Kurkikohtaus mad...
    Lol, well, Sibelius does remind me of film-music. Much more than Bach, for example, although not like it's identical to film music

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    I think the beginning of the english horn part uses even the same notes as the fellowship theme in LotR. It doesn't trouble me that they're similar. I love the fellowship theme very much. And it's not like they're excactly the same.
    The theme Howard Shore uses for the shire (I don't remember the name), the one including fiddle figurations, is something I find similar to the quasi-hymn at the first movement of Bruch's Scottish Fantasy. (Perhaps we could start a new thread on this subject).

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    [QUOTE=Manuel;10101]
    Today I discovered Guitar concerto Op. 99 by Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco. I had it in my shelves for a few years, but never heard it (it stick to the other work in the disc: Concierto de Aranjuez). The local orchestra is playing it next friday, so I wanted to get acquainted with the work.

    That's a delightful piece, one of my favourites, and I hope it encourages you to investigate his other guitar works. They're tuneful, elegant and evocative, and he was a master of scoring for guitar and small orchestra. Glad you've found it!
    "Music is a social act of communication among people, a gesture of friendship, the strongest there is."
    - Malcolm Arnold.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Harwood View Post
    That's a delightful piece, one of my favourites, and I hope it encourages you to investigate his other guitar works. They're tuneful, elegant and evocative, and he was a master of scoring for guitar and small orchestra. Glad you've found it!
    I already know his second violin concerto and a chamber work. I'm definitely going after his guitar works as you suggest.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Manuel View Post
    I already know his second violin concerto and a chamber work. I'm definitely going after his guitar works as you suggest.
    Good man. You'll be glad you did.
    Perhaps you could let us know how the concert went?
    "Music is a social act of communication among people, a gesture of friendship, the strongest there is."
    - Malcolm Arnold.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Crimson
    Another new discovery for me was Sibelius' 1st and 3rd symphonies. They sound remarkably similar to modern film music.
    Quote Originally Posted by Manuel
    Oh no... This sentence will drive Kurkikohtaus mad...
    GAAAAAAAAAAH!

    :angry:

    Now that I got that off my chest, I will give crimson the benefit of the doubt... because indeed, the 2nd theme of the 4th mvmt of the 1st Symphony is a little bit Hollywood. And for an uninitiated and unsuspecting listener, maybe even the main theme of the 2nd mvmt can sound like the "Love Theme" from a bad movie.

    But the 3rd Symphony?

    Cool, clear water.

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    Lol, maybe it was the colorfulness and lushness in Sibelius' music that made me think of film music. I'm totally new to traditional classical, coming from a film music background, so the first thing I paid attention to were the similarities

    However, I really enjoy listening to Sibelius. For me, it's easy to listen to, as opposed to some Bach (I'm thinking of Bach's Prelude an Fugue, for example). Sibelius keeps up my interest better. Bach may require some getting used to before I can really appreciate his music.

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    Quote Originally Posted by crimson View Post
    Bach may require some getting used to before I can really appreciate his music.
    Don't think that way! ! ! That's exactly what I do, and it took me three years to decide to listen to Mahler and Wagner. Because everybody speaks so well of them and their complexity, that I felt I may not understand what they wrote.

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    Hehe, ok. It's just that with Bach I find it quite hard to get into his music. Often listening to Bach feels even tiring to me. I cannot focus into his music very well. I think it might not be just a problem with Bach but most classical before romantics period (or at least with baroque music). I seem to like music from many romantic composers like Sibelius, Beethoven, Weber, Tchaikovsky... Although I admit that I haven't tried many baroque composers besides Bach.

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    Senior Member Mark Harwood's Avatar
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    This afternoon I looked through my wife Carol's old cassettes and found the Ravel and Debussy string quartets, played by the "Melos Quartett", on Deutsche Grammophon.
    Brilliant. They enthral and entertain from beginning to end. I heard side 2, the Debussy, first, and I'm glad I did, as you can hear how the Ravel is a response to the earlier work.
    Genius at play, times two.
    "Music is a social act of communication among people, a gesture of friendship, the strongest there is."
    - Malcolm Arnold.

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    Senior Member ChamberNut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Harwood View Post
    This afternoon I looked through my wife Carol's old cassettes and found the Ravel and Debussy string quartets, played by the "Melos Quartett", on Deutsche Grammophon.
    Brilliant. They enthral and entertain from beginning to end. I heard side 2, the Debussy, first, and I'm glad I did, as you can hear how the Ravel is a response to the earlier work.
    Genius at play, times two.

    Mark, I have the Schubert string quartets by Melos Quartet.

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