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Thread: Alexandre Da Costa

  1. #1
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    Again...this young Canadian has a very impressive resume...and you should see his REP!!!! Wow!

    I've never heard of him. :huh:

    I must be living in a cave or something...or our coverage of fine arts (in this case the musical arts) sucks royally... :angry:
    <span style='color:green'><span style='font-family:Optima'>Music is what feelings sound like...Anon</span>.</span>

  2. #2
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    I remembered that he was Zakhar Bron&#39;s student at the Escuela Superior de Musica Reina Sofia in Madrid? :unsure:
    He was a child prodigy I believe, and was exceptionally good with the piano also. And if I&#39;m correct, he&#39;s way of playing is what we called &#39;Russian school&#39;.

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    I&#39;ll check that...thanks&#33; But you do bring up a question...what main point comes from the Russian School?...
    <span style='color:green'><span style='font-family:Optima'>Music is what feelings sound like...Anon</span>.</span>

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    The Russian School is the start of revolutionary violin pedagogy as taught in the Russian conservatories at the turn of the last century. That &#39;innovative&#39; early 20th century period witnessed the full flowering of Russia&#39;s school of violin playing brought to perfection by a constellation of Oistrakh disciples-Gidon Kramer, Valery Klimov, Liana Isakadze, and Igor(Oistrakh&#39;s son ).
    Think of the Russian school as red-hot, with a lush tone and unbridled emotionality.

    The Germans as traditional, rich cerebral sense of structure and sound.

    The Chinese as colourless. :angry:

    The japanese as ice-blue, crstal clear and cool. They have this persistance about tonguing. :blink:

    Leopold AUER and his Violin School ( Russian+jewish )
    Chronic vibrato...

  5. #5
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    ...aha...LOL...it appears the Russians and Germans have it right&#33;...
    <span style='color:green'><span style='font-family:Optima'>Music is what feelings sound like...Anon</span>.</span>

  6. #6
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    I agree, but where would one go to find a russian teacher in lebanon <_<

    all we have is the "french" school, in the sense that all our teachers studied in france. anybody knows what that could be like? I have heard that the franco-belgian school is excellent and responsible for people like Ysaye (sp?) and Grumieux etc...

    I still like russian&#39;s more <_<

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    I dunno how the French school is like...but I always thought of French as silvery and rather refined in tone. U hardly find em agressive in playing, esp. so with the cellists. But the French have very intricate bow works...do u think so?

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    What I&#39;d need to see...to help me fully understand...are audio-visual images of the same few measures being played in all the different styles...then I&#39;d have a head start on it all...
    <span style='color:green'><span style='font-family:Optima'>Music is what feelings sound like...Anon</span>.</span>

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