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Thread: Death AND The Maiden

  1. #31
    Senior Member Merl's Avatar
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    I think I covered 4 that I really rate in this thread, below.

    What are your favorite "Death and the Maiden" string quartet recordings?

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kjetil Heggelund View Post
    Why on earth like showering in luke warm water? Please explain! Those guys are some of my favorites! Anyway you can try the Cleveland Quartet
    They both play the piece too fast for me

  3. #33
    Senior Member Merl's Avatar
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    I'll add the British Dorics to my list. I'm gradually falling in love with their SQ performances. Their Haydn is excellent, their Britten terrific, their Mendelssohn divine, their Korngold the best available.... This one is just as good.

    Schubert_CHAN10737.jpg

  4. #34
    Senior Member flamencosketches's Avatar
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    I must confess that I don't hear this as one of the "great" chamber works of all time—certainly not in the league of Beethoven's late quartets or Schubert's own String Quintet in C. Is it a matter of not having heard the right recording? Maybe, but I doubt it—I have some good ones: Italiano, Chilingirian, Pavel Haas, & Amadeus. But I'll gladly continue giving it a try every once in a while to see if my opinion changes.

    Disclaimer: Schubert is one of my very favorite composers. But my great esteem for him does not rest on the strength of this work or any of his string quartets.

  5. #35
    Senior Member Allegro Con Brio's Avatar
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    ^Yup. I really don’t like this quartet at all despite absolutely adoring Schubert (who, if not for the existence of Bach and Brahms, would likely be my favorite composer). I find it somewhat contrived and don’t think it belongs in the same realm as towering masterpieces of profundity like Winterreise, Die Schone Mullerin, and the late sonatas. I like the 15th and the string quintet much better, though I don’t think either of those works are as great as the Trout quintet and piano trios.
    Last edited by Allegro Con Brio; Jul-07-2020 at 02:20.
    "If we understood the world, we would realize that there is a logic of harmony underlying its manifold apparent dissonances." - Jean Sibelius

    "Art, like morality, consists of drawing the line somewhere." - G.K. Chesterton

    "Beethoven tells you what it’s like to be Beethoven and Mozart tells you what it’s like to be human. Bach tells you what it’s like to be the universe." - Douglas Adams

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  7. #36
    Senior Member Simplicissimus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Allegro Con Brio View Post
    ^Yup. I really don’t like this quartet at all despite absolutely adoring Schubert (who, if not for the existence of Bach and Brahms, would likely be my favorite composer). I find it somewhat contrived and don’t think it belongs in the same realm as towering masterpieces of profundity like Winterreise, Die Schone Mullerin, and the late sonatas. I like the 15th and the string quintet much better, though I don’t think either of those works are as great as the Trout quintet and piano trios.
    I feel the same way. I’ve had the Emerson Quartet’s recording in my collection for a long time, but I recently discovered Michael Gielen’s orchestration of this work, and I actually enjoy it a lot more than the SQ version.

  8. #37
    Senior Member jegreenwood's Avatar
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    I've always like SQ13 more - at least the first two movements. Also the Quartetsatz.

    I didn't "get" No. 15 at first. For a long time my only recording was from the Juilliard SQ, and it just seemed endless. A few years back I picked up the Quartetto Italiano recording and discovered the beauty of the work.

    I love the Trout, the octet and the piano trios, but my highest esteem is reserved for the string quintet - maybe my single favorite piece of music.

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  10. #38
    Senior Member Enthusiast's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Allegro Con Brio View Post
    ^Yup. I really don’t like this quartet at all despite absolutely adoring Schubert (who, if not for the existence of Bach and Brahms, would likely be my favorite composer). I find it somewhat contrived and don’t think it belongs in the same realm as towering masterpieces of profundity like Winterreise, Die Schone Mullerin, and the late sonatas. I like the 15th and the string quintet much better, though I don’t think either of those works are as great as the Trout quintet and piano trios.
    I love it and feel those who find it disappointing may be looking for the wrong things in it. They seem to want something more profound?

  11. #39
    Senior Member Allegro Con Brio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enthusiast View Post
    I love it and feel those who find it disappointing may be looking for the wrong things in it. They seem to want something more profound?
    Do you see it as a heartwrenching investigation of the psychology of death or just a fun piece? I’ve always got the impression that I should be hearing it as the former and come out disappointed because it seems kind of cheesy that way.
    "If we understood the world, we would realize that there is a logic of harmony underlying its manifold apparent dissonances." - Jean Sibelius

    "Art, like morality, consists of drawing the line somewhere." - G.K. Chesterton

    "Beethoven tells you what it’s like to be Beethoven and Mozart tells you what it’s like to be human. Bach tells you what it’s like to be the universe." - Douglas Adams

  12. #40
    Senior Member Enthusiast's Avatar
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    ^ I wouldn't exactly say a fun piece but I don't think Schubert was aiming at a deep investigation of death, either. This is Schubert the extrovert, the entertainer even: I hear him playing to the gallery.

  13. #41
    Senior Member flamencosketches's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enthusiast View Post
    ^ I wouldn't exactly say a fun piece but I don't think Schubert was aiming at a deep investigation of death, either. This is Schubert the extrovert, the entertainer even: I hear him playing to the gallery.
    Yeah that sounds right. It's a very dramatic piece. Kind of along the lines of the Erlkönig but in chamber form. Maybe we are expecting too much from it. I'm listening now to the Pavel Haas recording and rather enjoying it. That cellist tears it up. This is a recording where the performers are really digging into their strings which I think is helpful.

  14. #42
    Senior Member flamencosketches's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Allegro Con Brio View Post
    Do you see it as a heartwrenching investigation of the psychology of death or just a fun piece? I’ve always got the impression that I should be hearing it as the former and come out disappointed because it seems kind of cheesy that way.
    I've been thinking about it all day. Yeah, it's a loaded nickname; pretend it doesn't exist and try again—remember, Schubert himself never called it that. It's not a bad piece by any means; I really enjoyed it today. And try the Pavel Haas Quartet recording!
    Last edited by flamencosketches; Jul-11-2020 at 02:05.

  15. #43
    Senior Member Allegro Con Brio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by flamencosketches View Post
    I've been thinking about it all day. Yeah, it's a loaded nickname; pretend it doesn't exist and try again—remember, Schubert himself never called it that. It's not a bad piece by any means; I really enjoyed it today. And try the Pavel Haas Quartet recording!
    Supraphon usually doesn’t make it on streaming services, but I’ll try and search it out. Maybe I just need to give the classic Busch the attention it deserves, their interpretations usually strike a chord with me.
    "If we understood the world, we would realize that there is a logic of harmony underlying its manifold apparent dissonances." - Jean Sibelius

    "Art, like morality, consists of drawing the line somewhere." - G.K. Chesterton

    "Beethoven tells you what it’s like to be Beethoven and Mozart tells you what it’s like to be human. Bach tells you what it’s like to be the universe." - Douglas Adams

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