Page 7 of 41 FirstFirst ... 3456789101117 ... LastLast
Results 91 to 105 of 604

Thread: Contemporary opera

  1. #91
    Senior Member Albert7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Salted Lakers City, UT
    Posts
    7,908
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    43

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by echo View Post
    Not sure... but is this an operatic adaptation of The Who?
    "if a horse could sing in a monotone, the horse would sound like Carly Simon, only a horse wouldn't rhyme 'yacht', 'apricot', and 'gavotte'. Is that some kind of joke?"
    --Robert Christgau
    "there's a fine line between having an open mind and having your whole brain fall out"
    --Anonymous

    アルバート セブン

  2. #92
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Madrid, Spain
    Posts
    4,476
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Anno Schreier is a German composer that wrote his first opera, Der Herr Gevatter, while still very young, at just 25 years old. Some years later, he won the Zurich Opera Prize for young composers, and premiered there in 2011 Die Stadt der Blinden, with a libretto by Kerstin Maria Pöhler, based on the novel by the Portuguese writer, and winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature, José Saramago: "Ensaio sobre a Cegueira"


  3. Likes dgee, arpeggio liked this post
  4. #93
    Senior Member Cavaradossi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    New York City, formerly C
    Posts
    709
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Albert7 View Post
    Skipping one year without contemporary opera is bad IMHO... it's like saying hey I don't want to get you sherbet when you end up with ice cream instead. The point is that fans of contemporary opera have to wait 365 days to see that Saariaho opera... that's a rather long delay .
    It's not like the Met is the only game in town for contemporary opera fans. Far from it. In addition to the regular seasons of several smaller scale opera companies, I'm aware of at least two annual contemporary festivals in New York City presenting a multitude of new works (COC's NewOp Festival and the Prototype Festival). If it's Saariaho you want, it's not a long wait: Gotham Chamber Opera's adaption of The Tempest Songbook opens in a few weeks.

  5. Likes arpeggio, schigolch liked this post
  6. #94
    nathanb
    Guest

    Default

    Another work that might be difficult to classify is a theatrical work, classified on some sites as opera, by Bernhard Lang: Das Theater Der Wiederholungen (or The Theatre Of Repetitions). While his work may not give me the same emotional response as all the wonderful spectral/etc stuff coming out, I found it nevertheless highly intriguing.

    2913275.jpg

    As a side note, here's my "Current Listening", which I'm posting mostly because people here seem to only mention Bluthaus...:

    3659496.jpg

    Certainly more approachable at 2/3rds the length, if nothing else...

  7. Likes schigolch liked this post
  8. #95
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Madrid, Spain
    Posts
    4,476
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Arguably, Bernhard Lang's more succesful approaches to the genre so far are Montezuma, Fallender Adler, with a plot based on the clash between spaniards and aztecs, between Cortés and Montezuma, that also inspired Rihm's "Die Eroberung von Mexico": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2EZw7TV6_Dg

    and, of course, I Hate Mozart:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ftsf8u8OxDA



  9. Likes silentio, Selby liked this post
  10. #96
    nathanb
    Guest

    Default

    I would love to hear any opera based on Montezuma. But yeah, I haven't delved far into Lang... I really just took him seriously at the start because he had not one, not two, but three discs on KAIROS. And those three are all I've heard. I have heard OF the I Hate Mozart... a tempting title to say the least Almost as tempting as the title of Kagel's Sankt-Bach-Passion.

  11. #97
    Senior Member Albert7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Salted Lakers City, UT
    Posts
    7,908
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    43

    Default

    Here is a wonderful link to good contemporary operas during the past decade.

    http://www.wqxr.org/#!/story/165159-...last-10-years/

    I single out:

    8. Karlheinz Stockhausen: Sonntag aus Licht (2003)
    Clocking in at nearly twice as long, Stockhausen’s ambitious Licht cycle trumps Wagner’s own marathon collection of operas and was completed in 2003 with Sonntag aus Licht (Sunday From Light). The composer spent 26 years modeling each of his seven operas after the mythologies surrounding the weeklong creation myth. While much has been made of paring down and a newfound sense of operatic austerity in the form of minimalism and chamber works, this mesmerizing epic of epic epicness is essential: On its own, Sonntag is so extensive that its individual scenes came from various commissions and have been premiered piecemeal (the work just received its world premiere this past April).
    "if a horse could sing in a monotone, the horse would sound like Carly Simon, only a horse wouldn't rhyme 'yacht', 'apricot', and 'gavotte'. Is that some kind of joke?"
    --Robert Christgau
    "there's a fine line between having an open mind and having your whole brain fall out"
    --Anonymous

    アルバート セブン

  12. #98
    Senior Member Becca's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    San Diego, California
    Posts
    3,740
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Unless I missed something (always possible), I am surprised not to have seen mention of one of the more successful recent operas ... George Benjamin's Written on Skin which seems to be getting rave reviews. Alex Ross writing in The New Yorker said: “Written on Skin” feels like the work of a genius unleashed.

    And then, of course, there is Mark Anthony Turnage's Anna Nicole.

  13. Likes silentio liked this post
  14. #99
    Senior Member Albert7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Salted Lakers City, UT
    Posts
    7,908
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    43

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Becca View Post
    Unless I missed something (always possible), I am surprised not to have seen mention of one of the more successful recent operas ... George Benjamin's Written on Skin which seems to be getting rave reviews. Alex Ross writing in The New Yorker said: “Written on Skin” feels like the work of a genius unleashed.

    And then, of course, there is Mark Anthony Turnage's Anna Nicole.
    I saw sections of Turnage's Anna Nicole with Westbroek and thought it was one of the most comic operas ever... It doesn't take itself seriously and the fact that it is sexually explicit in the arias is marvelous fun in fact.
    "if a horse could sing in a monotone, the horse would sound like Carly Simon, only a horse wouldn't rhyme 'yacht', 'apricot', and 'gavotte'. Is that some kind of joke?"
    --Robert Christgau
    "there's a fine line between having an open mind and having your whole brain fall out"
    --Anonymous

    アルバート セブン

  15. #100
    nathanb
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Becca View Post
    Unless I missed something (always possible), I am surprised not to have seen mention of one of the more successful recent operas ... George Benjamin's Written on Skin which seems to be getting rave reviews. Alex Ross writing in The New Yorker said: “Written on Skin” feels like the work of a genius unleashed.

    And then, of course, there is Mark Anthony Turnage's Anna Nicole.
    I thought of George Benjamin multiple times...it just so happened that each and every time was a time when I was being my usual socially-retarded self that thinks about TC threads even when he's not home.

    And of course, I had to try for as much obscurity as my small brain could muster... but I have yet to slip one past Maestro Schigolch's field of knowledge!

  16. Likes Becca, schigolch liked this post
  17. #101
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Madrid, Spain
    Posts
    4,476
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nathanb View Post
    I would love to hear any opera based on Montezuma
    Well, there are many operas based on Montezuma's tragedy in the history of the genre, indeed.

    But speaking about contemporary opera, and even if it's a little bit outside of the 1980 threshold we have established on this thread, I would recommend Roger Sessions's Montezuma:



    However, in spite of Lang's effort, or Lorenzo Ferrero's "La Conquista", I think the one contemporary piece on this subject that is of more interest to the average opera fan should be of course Die Eroberung von Mexico, by Wolfgang Rihm.





    Mr. Rihm worked for several years in this opera, hoping to get everything ready for the 500th Anniversary of Colón's first voyage to America in 1492. The libretto, by Rihm himself, it's based on texts by Antonin Artaud, Octavio Paz and old Mexican folk songs. This is not, however, a standard Romantic drama, but rather a reflection on the meeting of two cultures, two civilizations, and how one of them dies, and gives birth to something new. And most of that reflection, it's in the music, not in the libretto.


    Even if Mr. Rihm has commented sometimes that his inspiration for the opera was mainly vocal, and he pretended that singing is the center of the piece, my personal feeling is that the voices, along with most of the orchestra, are another element in the history that a wonderful, beautiful percussion is telling the audience. It's not until almost the end of the opera, that the voices of Montezuma and Cortes, and the choir, take into their own meaning, enunciating the death, and the resurrection, of Mexico.

    I had the opportunity to attend recently a staging of this opera, by Mr. Pierre Audi, that was visually stunning, with some interesting dancing, and the silent role of Malinche, being portrayed as a character from Japanese Nō theater. It's difficult to stage such a non-linear, mental drama, with near to no conventional action, but Mr. Audi's was a very nice try. It seems that a DVD will be released soon.

  18. Likes Mahlerian liked this post
  19. #102
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Madrid, Spain
    Posts
    4,476
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Towards the end of the 20th century, the American composer John Harbison received a commission from the MET, to write an opera based on Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gastby. It was premiered in 1999, with Jerry Hadley, Dawn Upshaw, Susan Graham and Lorraine Hunt Lieberson singing.


    Harbison's aim was to "create a piece different from the others, to find clear, fresh, large designs, to reinvent opera traditions"


    Was he succesful?. Reviews were mostly negative, sadly.




  20. Likes Mahlerian liked this post
  21. #103
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Madrid, Spain
    Posts
    4,476
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Jonas Forssell (Stockholm, 1956, he is the son of the writer Lars Forssell) was the resident composer of the Malmoe Opera back in 2008, when he premiered the operatic version of the drama (also adapted to the screen) "The Death and the Maiden", by the Chilean writer Ariel Dorfman, that was also the librettist.



    The plot is about a woman that, years after being tortured, meets by chance with someone that she believes is her torturer (she never saw his face), by his voice and by his obsession with a particular Schubert's String Quartet.


    Forssell wanted both to represent this extreme situation and also wrote the score playing around a little bit with Schubert's music.

    This is the beginning of the opera:

    http://www.goear.com/listen/c33ea9c

  22. #104
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Madrid, Spain
    Posts
    4,476
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Perhaps some TC members also interested in movies will remember Fatih Akin's, Head on (Gegen die Wand), premiered some years ago.

    An operatic version was soon forthcoming. The German composer Ludger Vollmer wrote the piece, and the premiere was in Bremen, the year 2008. The opera won the European Tolerance Award in 2009, and there have been further performances in other German theaters, and in Istanbul:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o7w7umza_tI

  23. #105
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Madrid, Spain
    Posts
    4,476
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default




    I watched Wolfgang Mitterer's opera massacre, about the Huguenots's killings in France and based on Christopher Marlowe (the opera is sung in English, except a few fragments in German), a few years ago, at Teatro del Canal, in Madrid.

    massacre, premiered in 2003, is not the only approach of the Austrian composer to the genre, but it's still clearly the more ambitious.

    From a musical point of view, the experience was fascinating, with some sound effects for instruments and voices, really fantastic. On the other hand, the drama was perhaps not fully there. Mr. Mitterer's considerable talent as a composer, was not so apparent in his work as librettist. Anyhow, a very interesting opera:


Page 7 of 41 FirstFirst ... 3456789101117 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Your age and contemporary music
    By myaskovsky2002 in forum Community Forum
    Replies: 58
    Last Post: May-01-2018, 21:39
  2. Contemporary Composers
    By shsherm in forum Composer Guestbooks
    Replies: 68
    Last Post: Jan-03-2015, 19:04
  3. Contemporary opera song from Classic FM 2000 - 2001 need help lol
    By lucidvig in forum Solved Cases (archive)
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: May-09-2011, 05:06
  4. Help with this piece. contemporary?
    By knsin0 in forum Solved Cases (archive)
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: Jun-03-2010, 16:02
  5. Contemporary style anyone??
    By Mahler Maniac in forum Classical Music Discussion
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: Oct-11-2006, 09:56

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •