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Thread: What opera are you currently listening to / watching? CD/DVD

  1. #11386
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    Senior Member ldiat's Avatar
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    Senior Member starthrower's Avatar
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    I love this one! It would be nice to have a re-issue.
    Short-term thinkers are rewarded with reelection, while those who dare to take seriously our responsibility to future generations commonly find themselves out of office.

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    Senior Member Fritz Kobus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by starthrower View Post


    I love this one! It would be nice to have a re-issue.
    Pretty freaky and interesting story: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julietta
    "All of Italian opera can be heard in [Bellini's] "Ah! non creda [mirarti]."
    --Renata Scotto in "Scotto, More Than a DIva."

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    Hobbies: fiddling with piranhas; plotting world domination; assassination; opera.

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    Senior Member Sieglinde's Avatar
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    I forgot to add this, watched a few weeks ago. First time, so I went for a traditional one. Some very nice music, although the choruses suffer from that early Verdi same-ness. Good arias, though, and finally a lady who doesn't just suffer and die but is quite the amazon and takes revenge. Although why she puts up with her whiny, insecure tenor and his constant jealousy when a very hot Ildar Abdrazakov wants to marry her and is dressed Like That is a mystery. Ezio is surprisingly shady (I didn't expect that) and it seems like at least he appreciates Attila's Khal Drogo-like barbaric sexiness. Leone (I assume the Pope Leo?) appearing being all "you shall not pass" was rather funny, though. And why do these Huns worship Odin?

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    The critics weren't particularly kind to this when it was performed by the LSO under Previn in a semi-staged version at the Barbican,. Andrew Clements in the Guardian was particularly vitriolic, but I have a lot of affection for it, as I played the doctor who takes Blanche off to the asylum at the end. I also doubled as one of Stanley's cronies and one of the soldiers in a dream sequence when she recounts visiting the baracks. It was quite something having Renee Fleming singing into my ear, as she draped herself over my naked torso!

    The score is derivative no doubt, but very approachable, with elements of jazz and reminiscent of Korngold. It was premiered in San Francisco and has had quite a few different performances round the world, but whether it survives remains to be seen.

    Janice Watson replaced Elizabeth Futral in London, but Fleming, Gilfrey and Griffey all reprised their roles from this production.
    "It's not enough to have a beautiful voice." Maria Callas

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    I'm thoroughly enjoying this. A more than decent Rossini rarity with a superb cast:

    Bianca.jpg

    N.

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    Senior Member Rogerx's Avatar
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    Fausto Cleva conducting; Verdi: Luisa Miller

    Anna Moffo (Luisa), Carlo Bergonzi (Rodolfo), Cornell MacNeil (Miller), Giorgio Tozzi (Walter), Ezio Flagello (Wurm), Shirley Verrett (Federica), Gabriella Carturan (Laura), Piero De Palma (Contadino)

    RCA Italiana Opera Chorus and Orchestra.
    Theatre, a forum for public debate, an arena for cathartic spectacle and somewhere for vain bitchy people to show off in front of big crowds!


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    Quote Originally Posted by Sieglinde View Post
    [IMG]https://www.grooves-inc.com/images/cover/428/853/rx70svcz.j31[/IMG]

    I forgot to add this, watched a few weeks ago. First time, so I went for a traditional one. Some very nice music, although the choruses suffer from that early Verdi same-ness. Good arias, though, and finally a lady who doesn't just suffer and die but is quite the amazon and takes revenge. Although why she puts up with her whiny, insecure tenor and his constant jealousy when a very hot Ildar Abdrazakov wants to marry her and is dressed Like That is a mystery. Ezio is surprisingly shady (I didn't expect that) and it seems like at least he appreciates Attila's Khal Drogo-like barbaric sexiness.Lucky Patcher 9Apps VidMate Leone (I assume the Pope Leo?) appearing being all "you shall not pass" was rather funny, though. And why do these Huns worship Odin?
    that which you are talking about that which you are talking about ?

  16. #11396
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    Quote Originally Posted by GregMitchell View Post


    The critics weren't particularly kind to this when it was performed by the LSO under Previn in a semi-staged version at the Barbican,. Andrew Clements in the Guardian was particularly vitriolic, but I have a lot of affection for it, as I played the doctor who takes Blanche off to the asylum at the end. I also doubled as one of Stanley's cronies and one of the soldiers in a dream sequence when she recounts visiting the baracks. It was quite something having Renee Fleming singing into my ear, as she draped herself over my naked torso!

    The score is derivative no doubt, but very approachable, with elements of jazz and reminiscent of Korngold. It was premiered in San Francisco and has had quite a few different performances round the world, but whether it survives remains to be seen.

    Janice Watson replaced Elizabeth Futral in London, but Fleming, Gilfrey and Griffey all reprised their roles from this production.
    Just an addendum to my earlier post.

    I must say that, regardless of the fact that the opera is steeped in memories for me, I did find listening to it this time around a profoundly moving and disturbing experience. We know so much more about mental illness now, and I found Stanley's treatment of Blanche totally unforgivable, whatever little fantasy she had made up for herself. His cruelty to her is far worse and much more knowing than Pinkerton's to Butterfly. Pinkerton's actions were the thoughtless acts of a carefree young man, and he is genuinely remorseful at the end of the opera. I often think there is a whole other story about how Pinkerton and his wife recover from what happens when they get back to the States. Stanley knowingly destroys his victim, and shows no remorse whatsoever. In fact you just know that he and Stella will continue much as they did before Blanche came along.

    Does Previn add anything that isn't in the original play, and is his music anything other than illustrative? Actually I think he does, and Blanche's last aria is painfully wistful, a sweet moment of repose before the horror of her being wrested to the ground by the nurse who is about to cart her off to the asylum.

    I hope posterity treats the piece more kindly than some of the critics did when it was new.
    Last edited by GregMitchell; Jan-12-2019 at 14:55.
    "It's not enough to have a beautiful voice." Maria Callas

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    One wouldn't really think of Callas as a natural for Mimi, but then many would not count her a natural for Gilda or Amina either, and yet she made highly successful recordings of both. As is her wont, she enters fully into the character, charming and diffident in the first two acts, but revealing a deeper vein of tragedy in the latter two acts than is often the case.

    The opera is cast from strength with Di Stefano in one of his best roles, Panerai a superb Marcello and Moffo a welcome relief from some of the sparky soubrettes who often play Musetta.

    Along with Beecham and Karajan, one of the most successful recordings of La Bohème out there, depite Votto being reliable rather than inspired.
    "It's not enough to have a beautiful voice." Maria Callas

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    Theatre, a forum for public debate, an arena for cathartic spectacle and somewhere for vain bitchy people to show off in front of big crowds!


    I forgive criticisms, I like to embrace enemies.

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    The Plainte italienne is beautiful - one of Lully's finest inspirations:
    Hobbies: fiddling with piranhas; plotting world domination; assassination; opera.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GregMitchell View Post

    One wouldn't really think of Callas as a natural for Mimi, but then many would not count her a natural for Gilda or Amina either, and yet she made highly successful recordings of both. As is her wont, she enters fully into the character, charming and diffident in the first two acts, but revealing a deeper vein of tragedy in the latter two acts than is often the case.

    The opera is cast from strength with Di Stefano in one of his best roles, Panerai a superb Marcello and Moffo a welcome relief from some of the sparky soubrettes who often play Musetta.

    Along with Beecham and Karajan, one of the most successful recordings of La Bohème out there, depite Votto being reliable rather than inspired.
    Singers can make a huge difference. They can make us believe in even the hokiest of situations. Callas, Di Stefano, Panerai and Moffo really make us believe. Callas is so great in delivering vocally Mimi's condition without going overboard. The ending of the opera always breaks my heart. The singer’s interaction when Mimi is brought in to the apartment. Di Stefano said it best when he said about the ending of the opera that it's not just singing its acting. He really in my opinion does it better than anybody else, when at the end he realizes that Mimi is dead. The sincerity of Callas' performance really makes a huge difference for me. Some sopranos do stuff with Mimi that I don't like at all.
    "First I sing loud. When I start to run out of breath I sing softer" Giuseppe Di Stefano on his Faust high c diminuendo

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