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Thread: Latest opera cd purchase.............

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    Senior Member Itullian's Avatar
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    Smile Latest opera cd purchase.............

    Tell us about your new opera cd..............

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    Senior Member sospiro's Avatar
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    See my reply to current listening . A Boris which GoneBaroque recommended & a Falstaff which Aksel recommended.

    Ann

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    Moderator mamascarlatti's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sospiro View Post
    See my reply to current listening . A Boris which GoneBaroque recommended & a Falstaff which Aksel recommended.

    eeeerm - how many Borises do you have now Annie?
    Natalie

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    Moderator mamascarlatti's Avatar
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    Natalie

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    Senior Member sospiro's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mamascarlatti View Post
    eeeerm - how many Borises do you have now Annie?


    Not enough. Anyway Lukas hopes to sing it one day so I need to know it in all it's variations.
    Ann

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    Senior Member sospiro's Avatar
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    @natalie, a really nice selection there. I bought the Kwiecen in Seattle & think it's gorgeous.
    Ann

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    Senior Member Itullian's Avatar
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    Strauss, Capriccio, Te Kanawa, Decca
    beautifully and richly recorded and sung.
    Strauss's last, I think, and just a gentle, warm, wonderful listen.
    love it.

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    Senior Member Itullian's Avatar
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    Sawallisch Meistersinger.

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    Member rsmithor's Avatar
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    Default "Lulu" Back in Town... and She's Singing "Songs Of The Auvergne"...

    Lulu - Alban Berg - Blu-ray - Salzburger Festspiele (2010) Starring Patricia Petibon, Michael Volle and Wiener Philharmoniker (2012)

    51-HGw+mg1L._SL500_AA300_.jpg

    Songs Of the Auvergne - by Joseph Canteloube, Pierre de la Roche and Netania Davrath (2003)

    61YSbtZtZfL._SS500_.jpg

    Songs Of the Auvergne 2 disc CD set arrived... and Berg's Lulu has just shipped...
    -- RS
    Opinionated? Yes... At least I have one...
    definition (adj. Holding stubbornly and often unreasonably to one's own opinions)

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    Member rsmithor's Avatar
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    Default Berg's Lulu - Met Opera/Levine/Schäfer/ 2001

    The recording, taken from the Met Saturday Matinee Broadcast, featured in "James Levine - Celebrating 40 Years At The Met [32 CD Set]" The 3 CD set is in a specially designed case, enhanced with photos from the Met/Levine/Schäfer/performances.

    Berg Lulu

    Met Lulu CD Cover.jpg

    Metropolitan Opera House
    April 21, 2001 Saturday Matinee Broadcast

    LULU

    Lulu....................Christine Schäfer
    Dr. Schön...............James Courtney
    Jack the Ripper.........James Courtney
    Countess Geschwitz......Hanna Schwarz
    Alwa....................David Kuebler
    Schigolch...............Franz Mazura
    Animal Tamer............Stephen West
    Acrobat.................Stephen West
    Painter.................Clifton Forbis
    African Prince..........Clifton Forbis
    Physician...............Mitchell Sendrowitz
    Professor...............Mitchell Sendrowitz
    Prince..................Graham Clark
    Manservant..............Graham Clark
    Marquis.................Graham Clark
    Dresser.................Jennifer Dudley
    Schoolboy...............Jennifer Dudley
    Page....................Jennifer Dudley
    Theater Manager.........Richard Vernon
    Banker..................Richard Vernon
    Journalist..............Richard Hobson
    Servant.................Andrew Gangestad
    Designer................Jane Dutton
    Girl....................Robin Blitch Wiper
    Mother..................Diane Curry
    Policeman...............David Brimmer
    Clown...................Abraham Marcus

    Conductor...............James Levine

    Production.................John Dexter
    Designer...................Jocelyn Herbert
    Lighting designer..........Gil Wechsler
    Stage Director.............Paul Mills

    Met Opera Shop
    $18.00
    $16.20 Members

    Opera News Review...
    "The first and only Metropolitan Opera production of Lulu, directed by the late John Dexter in the 1976-77 season with designs by Jocelyn Herbert, returned on April 9 in a revival staged by Paul Mills. The addition of Met Titles greatly increased audience access to this intensely theatrical work, and though empty seats grew in number after each intermission, most people seemed willing to give Alban Berg's score another try. They were helped along by a highly committed cast and an impassioned reading by the orchestra under James Levine.

    In a widely anticipated house debut, Christine Schäfer made the title role her own. Schäfer's voice and personality are small and subtle for a theater of this size, but the sets are conceived on a realistically reduced scale, and she seemed at home on the stage. Her portrayal in the first two acts showed little sign of the indisposition she was rumored (though not officially announced) to be experiencing. As if the technical hazards of the role didn't really exist, she sang it all as melodically as can be imagined, without mechanical or metallic traces in the coloratura. Both her tone and her stage presence created a languid, detached character, a calm center for the emotional storm surrounding her. Without harshness or stress, the lyricism of her sound created a magnetic halo of passive feminine attraction, apart from the calculating or willful behavior of which Lulu is also capable. But Act III -- where Friedrich Cerha's orchestration sets in, heavy on the brasses, less delicate or translucent than Berg's -- took its toll on the soprano. Though she still made her points in the intimate final scene, the gambling episode that begins the act found her voice and characterization disappearing amid the general hubbub.

    The drama needs another female figure, Lulu's polar opposite, and Hanna Schwarz supplied it with her serious, ultimately tragic Countess Geschwitz. This character's hopeless longing stands out as quite apart from the attempts of the others to manipulate Lulu to their own ends. Schwarz, vocally dark and steady, always suggested a reserve of strong feeling stored within, and when she finally expressed it, in Geschwitz's monologue before the last curtain, the intensity was still focused in dignity.

    The fact that the audience laughed at Dr. Goll's death of a stroke in Act I testifies to the odd mixture of elements underlying Lulu. If it weren't for the jokes, irony and parody, this drama would be Expressionist tragedy, but Berg wanted to preserve the variety, even the objectivity, of a movie camera. This way, it's clear that the wonderful buildup of tension in Dr. Schön's dialogue with the Painter in Act I, Scene 1, is purely a result of the exchange between these characters, not a commentary by the composer; and that the impassioned interlude following the scene depicts the Painter's delusions, not Berg's. Clifton Forbis's portrayal of the Painter gave all the frustration and despair of an artist whose idealized perceptions are on a collision course with reality.

    As twin pillars of reality, Schön and his son Alwa started out as proper businessmen in dress and manner, only to be unraveled by their obsessive involvement with Lulu. James Courtney masterfully enacted the crisis of self-control that arose from Schön's inability to escape his own inner forces. With feeling deeper than pathos, the bass-baritone articulated his own doom in the curtain line of the dressing-room scene, "Jetzt kommt die Hinrichtung" (Now comes the execution). In his Act III reincarnation as Schön's alter ego, Jack the Ripper, Courtney once again appeared as a well-dressed businessman, but this time he was delivering judgment rather than submitting to it.

    As David Kuebler played him, Alwa was another, younger Dr. Schön, externalizing to excess the inner drives that the elder repressed to excess. Act II, with the Schön parlor turned into a sort of Animal House, shows Alwa starting to come apart, thanks to his infatuation with Lulu -- expressed by Kuebler through a keen focus of vocal tone. This act is difficult to clarify or hold together, but the Met team managed to do both.

    Given the task of memorizing and executing such difficult voice parts, it's something of a miracle that these singers could act so well. Character tenor Graham Clark created three entirely different people as the Prince, Manservant and Marquis: with help from the makeup department, he could scarcely be recognized. Vocally, his insidious Marquis in Act III was sleazy and elegant at the same time. Stephen West, stentorian of voice, flexed his muscles narcissistically as the Acrobat, a vital presence. (West also played the Animal Tamer in the Prologue, a similar showoff.) Franz Mazura, who played Schön in the 1980 and '85 revivals, now moved to the role of Schigolch, the ancient former lover whom Lulu passes off as her father. It would be hard to imagine a seedier, shiftier Schigolch than Mazura's, informed with the inner vitality of a timeless survivor. Jennifer Dudley, who also played the Wardrobe Mistress and a Page, made the Schoolboy a memorably overwrought adolescent. The shorter roles were also handled with security and the sense of period that marked the production as a whole.

    At the center of this busy society, Schäfer personified Lulu's mesmerizing fragility, a clever innocence that sparked base motives or reckless passions in others. Levine's leadership, energized but deliberate, went for the score's underlying Romantic warmth, even though this meant more lucidity than urgency, therefore a long evening. At midnight, when the curtain descended on the final scene, Schwarz had delivered Geschwitz's dying words firmly and passionately, a valedictory as dark as the stage itself."


    JOHN W. FREEMAN
    -- RS
    Opinionated? Yes... At least I have one...
    definition (adj. Holding stubbornly and often unreasonably to one's own opinions)

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    Senior Member SixFootScowl's Avatar
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    A new opera to me:


    Adding a third Callas Sonnambula to my large Sonnambula collection:
    Last edited by SixFootScowl; Jan-28-2015 at 07:04.
    “Then he will also say to those on the left, ‘Depart from me, you who are cursed, into the eternal fire prepared for the devil and his angels!'" Matthew 25:41 (Christian Standard Bible)

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    Senior Member elgars ghost's Avatar
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    Got this one on order and am quite looking forward to it - it will also raise my Rossini opera collection to the grand total of two. In time I'll probably opt for a serious one next in order to hear another side of Rossini - most likely Semiramide.

    '...a violator of his word, a libertine over head and ears in debt and disgrace, a despiser of domestic ties, the companion of gamblers and demireps, a man who has just closed half a century without a single claim on the gratitude of his country or the respect of posterity...' - Leigh Hunt on the Prince Regent (later George IV).

    ὃν οἱ θεοὶ φιλοῦσιν ἀποθνῄσκει νέος [Those whom the gods love die young] - Menander

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    Senior Member starthrower's Avatar
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    Ligeti-Le Grand Macabre Salonen's English version.

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    Senior Member Tsaraslondon's Avatar
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    Doesn't this thread rather duplicate the "What Opera CD/DVD have you purchased recently?" thread?
    Last edited by Tsaraslondon; Jan-28-2015 at 17:55.
    "It's not enough to have a beautiful voice." Maria Callas

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    Senior Member SixFootScowl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elgars ghost View Post
    Got this one on order and am quite looking forward to it - it will also raise my Rossini opera collection to the grand total of two. In time I'll probably opt for a serious one next in order to hear another side of Rossini - most likely Semiramide.

    I have this one, but much prefer the one conducted by Abbado with Theresa Berganza. Both worthy to have in a collection.
    Last edited by SixFootScowl; Jan-28-2015 at 18:00.
    “Then he will also say to those on the left, ‘Depart from me, you who are cursed, into the eternal fire prepared for the devil and his angels!'" Matthew 25:41 (Christian Standard Bible)

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