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Thread: Favourite Requiem Mass?

  1. #61
    Senior Member MagneticGhost's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stevederekson View Post
    I know that once we've all listened to all the "main" stuff, we diverge off into the unknown, and we take much pride in doing so.

    But, I don't see how anyone can justify picking anyone other than Mozart in this case.
    As much as I love the first half of the Mozart, the second half after the Lacrimosa (which he didn't write) does nothing for me.
    “Let us be grateful to the people who make us happy; they are the charming gardeners who make our souls blossom.”

  2. #62
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    Faure's is my favorite.

    I did just listen to Fernando Lopes-Graça: Requiem for the first time and found it interesting.

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    Senior Member Headphone Hermit's Avatar
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    Ockeghem and Mozart

    but I also saw Penderecki's Polish Requiem on TV a couple of years ago and thought it was an interetsting piece - nice introductory article on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polish_Requiem . Perhaps that goes onto my next CD order!
    "Time is a great teacher, but unfortunately it kills all its pupils." Berlioz, 1856

  4. #64
    Senior Member stevederekson's Avatar
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    I was recently introduce to the Cherubini and was blown away by it.

    It was a Tristan-like discovery.

  5. #65
    Senior Member PetrB's Avatar
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    Robert Moran ~ Requiem; Chant du Cygne

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  7. #66
    Senior Member Xaltotun's Avatar
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    Berlioz for the noble grandeur, Verdi for the overflowing emotion and Victoria for the inward-turned mysticism.
    Wäre das Faktum wahr, – wäre der außerordentliche Fall wirklich eingetreten, daß die politische Gesetzgebung der Vernunft übertragen, der Mensch als Selbstzweck respektiert und behandelt, das Gesetz auf den Thron erhoben, und wahre Freiheit zur Grundlage des Staatsgebäudes gemacht worden, so wollte ich auf ewig von den Musen Abschied nehmen, und dem herrlichsten aller Kunstwerke, der Monarchie der Vernunft, alle meine Thätigkeit widmen.

  8. #67
    Senior Member Marschallin Blair's Avatar
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    The Solti Verdi Requiem with Sutherland, Horne, Pavarotti, and Talvela-- now that's a hard act to follow; even for John Eliot Gardiner.

    aaaaaa verdi.jpg

  9. #68
    Senior Member DavidA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetrB View Post
    Britten ~ War requiem -- Britten was atheist - or at the least Agnostic - this mass is missing the 'credo' section (which,dogmatically disqualifies it as liturgical,) and uses the rest of the body of the Latin requiem text along with the poetry of Wilfred Owen.
    Please note that the Credo is not there as it is not part of the text of the Catholic Requiem Mass. It's non-inclusion had nothing to do with Britten's beliefs or non-beliefs.

  10. #69
    Senior Member DavidA's Avatar
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    I'd say

    Verdi, Faure, Brahms, Britten, Mozart in no particular order.

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    I've mentioned before that I always have to dynamically allocate a slot for whatever I'm listening to at the time of making a list of favourites, so my list of Requiems will absolutely have to contain Verdi's. I'm being violently assaulted by it right now, in the 1960 incarnation with Price, Elias, Björling and Tozzi.

    Verdi.
    Fauré.
    Brahms.

    Perhaps.

    (edit/comment: Oddly, and a bit shamefully, I had this idea in my head that I hadn't heard Verdi's Requiem. Or at least not knowingly. Listening through it, I realized that not only is it as fundamentally familiar as a mother's lullaby, I also know for certain that I've been to at least one live performance of it - I have a vivid memory of the bassoon player screwing up the Dies Irae bit. Why I'd blocked out knowing it I have no idea.)
    Last edited by Vinyl; Jan-24-2014 at 20:42.

  12. #71
    Senior Member cjvinthechair's Avatar
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    3 more traditional requiems I love :
    Sigismund Neukomm
    Guy Ropartz
    Giovanni Sgambati

    3 more modern:
    Vyacheslav Artyomov
    Karl Rutti
    Jeajoon Ryu

    Mostly on You Tube in full/part - do try one or two !
    Clive

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  14. #72
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    Brahms
    Mozart
    Howells

    Also, Howells' Hymnus Paradisi is basically a requiem, and a glorified reworking and expansion of his a cappella Requiem. Would that possibly count?

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  16. #73
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    While Brahms' work has the title "Requiem," in the context of this thread, it is not a requiem mass - it most certainly isn't a mass. It is more simply a setting of scriptures from the Lutheran Bible set to orchestration.

  17. #74
    Senior Member MagneticGhost's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Orange Soda King View Post
    Brahms
    Mozart
    Howells

    Also, Howells' Hymnus Paradisi is basically a requiem, and a glorified reworking and expansion of his a cappella Requiem. Would that possibly count?
    I'll allow it because it's such a great work
    “Let us be grateful to the people who make us happy; they are the charming gardeners who make our souls blossom.”

  18. #75
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    It's plain to see and hear that the traditional Requiem Mass has evolved in many ways, even with a 1970 revision for the traditional.

    Desenclos Messe de Requiem (1963) fulfills the staunchest structural requirement, yet its attractive soft overtone is perhaps closer to New Age.

    I say don't punish creativity, as long as it remains in a classical mould.

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