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Thread: Symphony No. 2 in D Major

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    Senior Member 4/4player's Avatar
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    Question Symphony No. 2 in D Major

    Hey guys!

    I just love Sibelius' " Symphony No. 2 in D Major". I really enjoy the "rising climax"!
    Anyone else would like to share their insights or opinions on this wonderful piece?

    Musically,
    4/4 player
    " 'Penitence!'
    'No!'
    'Penitence!'
    'No!'
    'Penitence!'
    'No!'
    'Yes!'
    'Nooooooooooo!' [Dragged down into Hell]
    - Act two: Finale of Mozart's "Don Giovanni"

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    Senior Member Lisztfreak's Avatar
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    It's strange how I always felt that the Second is Sibelius' least fine... probably I'm wrong, after all it's only my personal, non-musician's judgement. No doubt it is well written, but it's kind of lacking a certain spirit of the other symphonies of this great composer.

    It seems however the most accesible, it must be said. And there are some great tunes to it. But overall, I prefer all the others to this one, I think.
    ''Oh, the String Quartet - oh, the Divine Scratching!''

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    Senior Member Kurkikohtaus's Avatar
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    The problem with Sibelius 2nd is that it is not actually written by Sibelius, it was written by his Italian collaborator Andrei Lucciano. The Russian-trained Lucciano, who later on taught Stravinsky, Shostakovich and Darius Milhaud, consistantly supplied Sibelius with work after work, which the grand Finnish "Master" then published as his own pieces. :angry:

    Seriously, though, what I enjoy about this piece is that very often, the most emotionally intense passages are often the transitions (in terms of the formal structure) as opposed to the themes. This gives a rather long piece (for Sibelius, anyway) a constant forward drive, which never sags.

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    Senior Member Saturnus's Avatar
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    I know that Sibelius wrote the symphony in italy while studying there, but it didn't come to my mind that it was written for him!

    Well, I think it is a wonderful symphony anyway. The movement I like the most, or find most intresting, is the second. I feel that the last movement was duly done, some mucho grande finale to please the audience (but very well written nevertheless).

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    Assistant Administrator Chi_townPhilly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kurkikohtaus View Post
    The problem with Sibelius 2nd is that it is not actually written by Sibelius, it was written by his Italian collaborator Andrei Lucciano...
    I think that horse has joined Grane, and is currently whinnying in the Choir Invisible

    With regard to the topic at hand, though, Symphony 2 remains at the top of my chart for Sibelius symphonies. I have moments of thinking that I've been lulled by "entry-level Sibelius," and sometimes I have almost equal fondness for #5, but no number of auditions has yet supplanted fondness for 2 (and 5) relative to the other Sibelius symphonies.
    The hardest knife ill us'd doth lose his edge. Shakespeare- Sonnet 95

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    Junior Member LaciDeeLeBlanc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kurkikohtaus View Post
    The problem with Sibelius 2nd is that it is not actually written by Sibelius, it was written by his Italian collaborator Andrei Lucciano. The Russian-trained Lucciano, who later on taught Stravinsky, Shostakovich and Darius Milhaud, consistantly supplied Sibelius with work after work, which the grand Finnish "Master" then published as his own pieces. :angry:

    Seriously, though, what I enjoy about this piece is that very often, the most emotionally intense passages are often the transitions (in terms of the formal structure) as opposed to the themes. This gives a rather long piece (for Sibelius, anyway) a constant forward drive, which never sags.
    What what what??? Where did you hear this? I have never heard this. What were the circumstances? Was this a bargain/bribe?
    "Farewell happy fields
    Where joy for ever dwells: hail horrors, hail
    Infernal world, and thou profoundest Hell
    Recieve thy new possesor: one who brings
    A mind not to be changed by place or time.
    The mind is its own place, and in itself
    Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n." - Satan from Paradise Lost by John Milton (Book I: Lines 249-255)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kurkikohtaus View Post
    The problem with Sibelius 2nd is that it is not actually written by Sibelius, it was written by his Italian collaborator Andrei Lucciano. The Russian-trained Lucciano, who later on taught Stravinsky, Shostakovich and Darius Milhaud, consistantly supplied Sibelius with work after work, which the grand Finnish "Master" then published as his own pieces. :angry:

    We should start a new thread in which we ask you to prove this, but as you are unable to do that... you turn out to be a violent guy and you're finally banned...


    Well... no. We have already done that.

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    Senior Member Edward Elgar's Avatar
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    When I heard the 2nd, I rated it as high as the 5th due to its intelligent structure and kick-*** motifs. I knew the symphony had been inspired by his trip to Italy, and this Andrei Lucciano may have given him a few ideas along the way. However, the symphony is typical Sibelius genius and I love it!
    When all the paint has been dried, when all the stone has been carved, music shall remain, and we shall work with what remains.

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    Senior Member Kurkikohtaus's Avatar
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    Dear friends...

    ... and dear Newcomers, new to the vagaries of Robert Newman...

    Just to set the record straight for those of you who didn't get the joke, there's no such person as Andrei Lucciano, this little quip was my little parallel shot at Mr. Newman's fanaticism.

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