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Thread: Greatest symphonic movements

  1. #91
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    Allan Pettersson's Symphony 9. It is a movement of one hour and 20 minutes long
    The Comissiona recording.

  2. #92
    Senior Member DeepR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ethereality View Post
    I can't comprehend the vast appreciation in this thread for Dvorak's 9-4 over Mov 1 and 2. I find them easily more impactful and followable. Listen to these moments:

    Mov 1 - https://youtu.be/VuaTY3zHO8Q?t=221 A novel intensity of theme-building
    Mov 2 - https://youtu.be/VuaTY3zHO8Q?t=1077 all of 17:57 - 18:40. Stunningly majestic
    Mov 1 - https://youtu.be/VuaTY3zHO8Q?t=654 Arguably the best part for me


    What is it people personally like more about Mov 4?
    I don't know but I for one enjoy the 3rd movement the most!
    Last edited by DeepR; Jan-10-2020 at 18:14.

  3. #93
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    Certainly for me the top 3 are:

    1. Mahler 7 - 1st movement. The clear darkness in this movement separates it from the more disjoint and clouded dark movements such as the 1st movement from the Resurrection. As the culmination of the instrumental middle period, Mahler's scientific voice combines with a seamless weave of form to produce a deeply introverted, mysterious, and intellectual journey so powerful that it is hard to even listen to the rest of the symphony.

    2. Mahler 6 - 4th movement. Compared to the above, this movement is far more illuminated, and reminds one of daylit buildings of great architecture. From the opening rise to the reprisal of the "fate" motif, we are ever made aware of the vastness of this 32-minute Finale. And as the conclusion to the heroic Sixth symphony, it growls with the same savage strength that characterizes the preceding movements.

    3. Mahler 5 - 1st movement. This is a special one for me, and perhaps has a more difficult time objectively defending its position than the other two. It possesses a cosmic power, derived from a descending brass and cello motif in the beginning, that is unmatched by anything else I have heard. In the middle of the piece, this power bursts forth in the pure sublime. And despite being an unconvential opening movement and admittedly lacking development (which is done in the complementing 2nd movement), the trumpet motif and the slow repetitions of the string melody "prepare the mind" and draw us irresistably into the world-spanning emotional journey of the Fifth.

    On the other hand, one movement I could never get behind is the 4th in Mahler's 7th.

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  5. #94
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    The ones that immediately come into my head are:

    Bruckner 8: Finale

    Sibelius 5: First movement

    Beethoven 3: First movement

    Mahler 10: Adagio

    Shostakovich 10: First movement

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  7. #95
    Senior Member Allegro Con Brio's Avatar
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    Bruckner 4 first movement, 6-9 Adagios
    Mahler 1 and 2 Finales, 4 Adagio, 6 Finale, all four movements of the 9th
    Brahms 1 Finale, 2 second movement, 4 outer movements
    Shostakovich 5 Largo
    Dvorak 9 Largo
    Sibelius 2 second movement, 4 3rd movement, 5 1st movement
    Beethoven 3 Funeral March, 9 Finale

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  9. #96
    Senior Member flamencosketches's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Allegro Con Brio View Post
    Bruckner 4 first movement, 6-9 Adagios
    Mahler 1 and 2 Finales, 4 Adagio, 6 Finale, all four movements of the 9th
    Brahms 1 Finale, 2 second movement, 4 outer movements
    Shostakovich 5 Largo
    Dvorak 9 Largo
    Sibelius 2 second movement, 4 3rd movement, 5 1st movement
    Beethoven 3 Funeral March, 9 Finale
    Agreed re: Sibelius 5/1. What a movement.

  10. #97
    Senior Member leonsm's Avatar
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    Mahler 2, V mvt.
    Brucker 8, I mvt.
    Atteberg 3, III mvt.
    Walton 1, I mvt.
    Shostakovich 5, IV mtv

  11. #98
    Senior Member Skilmarilion's Avatar
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    One that comes to mind, per composer.

    Beethoven 5, II.
    Brahms 4, I.
    Bruckner 7, II.
    Dvořák 8, III.
    Glass 9, II.
    Haydn 103, III.
    Mahler 9, IV.
    Martinů 4, III.
    Mendelssohn 3, I.
    Mozart 25, I.
    Nielsen, 3, I.
    Pärt 4, I.
    Poulenc Sinfonietta, III.
    Rachmaninov 2, III.
    Raff 3, II.
    Rautavaara 7, III.
    Shostakovich 5, III.
    Sibelius 2, I.
    Tchaikovsky 6, I.
    Vaughan Williams 5, III.

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  13. #99
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    Shostakovich 10, second movement, by the Czech PO and Ancerl in 1955. One of the greatest marriages of emotion and virtuousity I have ever heard.

  14. #100
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    24 movements for 24 composers:
    Schumann 2, mov. 4
    Mendelssohn 3, Mov. 1
    Borodin 2, mov. 4
    Franck, mov. 3
    Scriabin 3, 3
    Saint-Saëns 3, 2
    Hanson 2, 3
    Prokofiev 5, 4
    Berlioz Symphonie Fant., 4
    Ives 4, 4
    Schubert 8, 1
    Dvorak 9, 4
    Haydn 104, 4
    RVW 5, 3
    Nielsen 3, 1
    Mozart 41, 4
    Tchaikovsky 6, 1 or 4
    Brahms 3, 3
    Shostakovich 5, 4
    Sibelius 7
    Bruckner 8, 4
    Mahler 2, 5 or 6, 4

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  16. #101
    Senior Member Strange Magic's Avatar
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    I am especially fond of the first movement of the Prokofiev No.3; also the first movement of the Martinů No.1 (plus numerous others, but I thought I'd get these two noted).

  17. #102
    Senior Member Bill Cooke's Avatar
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    So many! I'll try to keep the list short, though. And I'll include only symphonies.

    Brahms 4 - 4th movement. Never fails to move me profoundly.
    Berlioz Symphonie Fantastique - Witch's Sabbath. Any single movement is a standout.
    Mahler 6 - 4th movement. All of the movements in this symphony are extremely powerful, but the final one is earth shattering.
    Mahler 2 - 1st movement. So perfect I sometimes wonder if I need to move on to the rest. (I usually do.)
    Shostakovich 10 - 2nd movement. Short, but exhilarating and terrifying.
    Shostakovich 6 - 1st movement. So powerful it casts a long shadow over the lighter subsequent movements.
    Bax 1 - 1st movement. So menacing and foreboding.
    Walton 1 - 1st movement - Blazingly intense. Previn's classic account leaves me breathless.
    Beethoven 7 - 2nd movement - so incredibly poignant. I like it played a little on the slow side to wring out every bit of pathos.
    Prokofiev 5 - last movement. A real foot stomping hackle raiser.
    Korngold - 3rd movement. I love its slow buildups and thick, dreamy atmosphere.
    Martinu 1 - 1st movement. So much to love in the symphonies of Martinu. The first movement of the first symphony is a perfect statement of his unique language and style, and a perfect introduction for the curious.
    Last edited by Bill Cooke; Apr-07-2020 at 16:24.

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  19. #103
    Senior Member Joachim Raff's Avatar
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    Sgambati: Symphony No. 1, mov II
    Raff: Symphony No.3, movIII
    Peterson-Berger: Symphony no1: movIII
    Taneyev Symphony No4, Mov I
    Kalinnikov: Symphony No.1, MovI
    Alfven: Symphony No. 3, MovII
    BALAKIREV: Symphony 1, MovIII
    Berwald: Sinfonie sérieuse, MovI
    Blumenfeld Felix symphony, MovIV
    Fibich: Symphony No.3, MovIV
    Grieg: Symphony in C Minor, MovI
    Buttner: Symphony in B Minor MovIV
    Glazunov: Symphony No. 6 MovI
    Glière: Symphony No. 3 MovI
    Ippolitov Ivanov Symphony No. 1 MovI
    Noskowski Symphony No.3 MovIV
    Reber, Symphonie No 4 MovI
    Stenhammar: Symphony No. 2, MovIV
    d'Indy : Symphonie No2. MovII
    Wetz: Symphony No. 3 MovI
    Last edited by Joachim Raff; Apr-08-2020 at 03:25.

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  21. #104
    Senior Member DeepR's Avatar
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    Let's say a top 5 for the big names:
    Mozart 41 - IV
    Beethoven 3 - I
    Bruckner 5 - IV
    Mahler 2 - V
    Sibelius 7

    And here's a few movements that I think are great and were not mentioned yet:
    Siegmund von Hausegger - Natursymphonie - Mov. IV: Massive, intense and utterly grandiose.
    Kurt Atterberg - No. 4 - Mov. II: Sublime, gorgeous!
    Mendelssohn - No. 2 - Mov. XIII: So joyful and uplifting, nothing wrong with it!
    Scriabin - No. 2 - Mov. III: Magical, only Scriabin (listen to Ashkenazy).
    Last edited by DeepR; Apr-08-2020 at 22:30.

  22. #105
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    Just a few of the top of my head

    Mozart - 40 - First Movement
    Beethoven - 6 - First Movement
    Mahler - 2 - First and Last Movements
    Mahler - 5 - First Movement
    Bruckner - 8 - First and Third Movements
    Bruckner - 9 - First Movement
    Elgar - 1 - First and Last Movements
    Tchaikovsky - 6 - First and Last Movements
    Sibelius - 2 and 5 - Last Movements

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