Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 16

Thread: Schubert D.950-D.960

  1. #1
    Senior Member Hausmusik's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    1,073
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Schubert D.950-D.960

    This is a thread to discuss this astonishing sequence of compositions, no fewer than half of them not only masterpieces, but masterpieces even among masterpieces: the E-flat mass (D.950), the String Quintet (D.956), the Schwanengesang lieder (D.957) and the three final piano sonatas (D.958-960).

    The full list:

    D.950 Mass No. 6 in E-flat for Quartet, mixed chorus, and orchestra
    D.951 Rondo in A for piano duet
    D.952 Fugue in E minor for Organ or piano duet
    D.953 "Der 92. Psalm, Lied für den Sabbath" for baritone solo and chorus
    D.954 Chorus "Glaube, Hoffnung und Liebe" with winds
    D.955 Song "Glaube, Hoffnung und Liebe"
    D.956 String Quintet in C
    D.957 Song Cycle "Schwanengesang"
    D.958 Piano Sonata in C minor
    D.959 Piano Sonata in A Major
    D.960 Piano Sonata in B-flat Major

    What are your favorite works from this sequence? What are your favorite recordings?
    Last edited by Hausmusik; May-15-2012 at 02:06.

  2. Likes science, Ramako, Kieran and 1 others liked this post
  3. #2
    Senior Member Stargazer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    483
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    His D.960 piano sonata is my favorite for sure! His string quartet comes close, but the piano sonata has a special place in my heart lol. I actually haven't heard a couple of the songs you listed so I'm going to have to check them out tomorrow!

  4. Likes science, Hausmusik liked this post
  5. #3
    Senior Member science's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    The Eastern and Northern
    Posts
    19,332
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    51

    Default

    The string quintet has been my favorite there, but 960 may be my favorite now.

    There is a somewhat idiosyncratic take on it by Richter on the alto label. He takes it slooooow especially in the first movement. Made it new for me. I don't recommend it as a "reference recording" or anything, but as a really thought-provoking, personal look at a masterpiece by a master. If you are a fan of Pogorelich it's the kind of thing you'll enjoy.
    Liberty for wolves is death to the lambs.

  6. Likes Hausmusik, peeyaj liked this post
  7. #4
    Senior Member peeyaj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    1,051
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    12

    Default

    These late masterpieces just show how much promise Schubert possess in the last few days of his life..

    The inscription on his tomb is a perfect statement.


    "Here music has buried a treasure, but even fairer hopes."

  8. Likes Romantic Geek, Ramako, Kieran and 1 others liked this post
  9. #5
    Senior Member Jeremy Marchant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Cotswolds, UK
    Posts
    1,011
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by peeyaj View Post
    These late masterpieces just show how much promise Schubert possess in the last few days of his life..
    But, perhaps, an awareness of imminent death motivated him...

  10. #6
    Senior Member Ukko's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    6,176
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeremy Marchant View Post
    But, perhaps, an awareness of imminent death motivated him...
    I have wondered if most interpretations of the last three sonatas have been unduly influenced by the emotional content of the quintet. The sonatas do not have to be imbued with dark thoughts, witness Schnabel's interpretations.
    I spent a fortune on deodorant before I realized that people don't like me anyway.

  11. Likes Ramako liked this post
  12. #7
    Senior Member peeyaj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    1,051
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeremy Marchant View Post
    But, perhaps, an awareness of imminent death motivated him...
    Maybe.. But it is a known fact that he was planning to take lessons for counterpoint from Simon Sechter at the last few weeks of his life. Hardly, an activity of a dying man.

  13. Likes Romantic Geek, Ramako liked this post
  14. #8
    Senior Member science's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    The Eastern and Northern
    Posts
    19,332
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    51

    Default

    I re-listened to 958 and 959 last night, and they're not as dark as 960 is at points. But 960 is my favorite because of that darkness.
    Liberty for wolves is death to the lambs.

  15. #9
    Senior Member Romantic Geek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    University of Cincinnati (CCM)
    Posts
    553
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by peeyaj View Post
    Maybe.. But it is a known fact that he was planning to take lessons for counterpoint from Simon Sechter at the last few weeks of his life. Hardly, an activity of a dying man.
    Can't imagine what kind of amazing works he could write after studying with Sechter...
    B.M. Music Theory - University of Connecticut
    M.M. Music Theory - College-Conservatory of Music at the University of Cincinnati (in process)
    My Soundclick Page - feel free to browse my compositions I post up there

  16. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    516
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    No musical 31-year-old ever achieved more than Schubert.

    Humanity was indeed robbed.
    GG

  17. #11
    Senior Member Hausmusik's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    1,073
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by science View Post
    I re-listened to 958 and 959 last night, and they're not as dark as 960 is at points.
    science, but what about the 959 slow movement?
    A painter paints pictures on canvas. But musicians paint their pictures on silence. ― Leopold Stokowski

  18. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Albany, NY
    Posts
    830
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I forget who said it, but someone posited that the most productive eighteen months (in terms of masterpieces) in all of music, were those that commenced with the death of Beethoven, and ended with that of Schubert.

  19. Likes Ramako liked this post
  20. #13
    Senior Member Kieran's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Dublin, Ireland
    Posts
    2,988
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Were all of these composed in his final 12 months? It's a study in excellence to listen to the last five works on the list, in succession. I might root them out for the weekend, actually. I haven't listened to old Franz in a couple of weeks...

  21. #14
    Member userfume's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    98
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    String Quintet

  22. #15
    Senior Member Hausmusik's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    1,073
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kieran View Post
    Were all of these composed in his final 12 months?
    Kieran, good question. Did a little research on WP and IMSLP, and 950 and 956-960 (whcih are the ones most of us would likely consider the greatest works of this sequence) were all composed in 1828 within 10 months of his death.

    D.950 Mass (1828--couldn't find a more precise date)
    D.956 String Quintet in C (Summer 1828)
    D.957 Song Cycle "Schwanengesang" (completed by Oct. 1828)
    D.958-960 Last Piano Sonatas (Spring-Fall 1828)

    Schubert died in November 1828.

    It is fascinating to think of Schubert composing the String Quintet in the middle of writing his final sonatas. I have seen it argued that the second movement of the B Flat sonata resembles the adagio of the Quintet in its texture--that its textures are more chamber-like than pianistic.
    Last edited by Hausmusik; Feb-22-2013 at 14:36.
    A painter paints pictures on canvas. But musicians paint their pictures on silence. ― Leopold Stokowski

  23. Likes Kieran liked this post
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. CD LP Help - Schubert D.956
    By misterjones in forum Recorded Music and Publications
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: May-31-2019, 02:19
  2. Schubert and Rodrigo
    By Hazel in forum Classical Music Discussion
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: Aug-15-2011, 16:21
  3. which Schubert sonata is this?
    By timbo in forum Classical Music Discussion
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: Aug-03-2011, 01:52
  4. Is it Frantz Schubert ?
    By pilega in forum Solved Cases (archive)
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: May-30-2010, 19:15
  5. Schubert op. 49
    By scottlens in forum Classical Music Discussion
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: Apr-19-2008, 05:58

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •