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Thread: Giuseppe Verdi

  1. #46
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    I never tire of the Force of Destiny overture!

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    Senior Member KenOC's Avatar
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    An amusing Verdi story I got in the e-mail today.
    ----------------------------------
    Is the customer always right? Apparently Giuseppe Verdi thought so – to a degree, at least. On today’s date in 1872, Verdi sent a note to his publisher, Giulio Ricordi, with an attached letter he had received from a disgruntled customer, a certain Prospero Bertani, who had attended not one, but two performances of Verdi’s then brand new opera, “Aida.”

    “I admired the scenery,” wrote Bertani, “I listened with pleasure to the excellent singers, and took pains to let nothing escape me. After it was over, I asked myself whether I was satisfied. The answer was ‘no’.” Since everyone else seemed to think “Aida” was terrific, Bertani attended a second performance to make sure he wasn’t mistaken, and concluded: “The opera contains absolutely nothing thrilling or electrifying. If it were not for the magnificent scenery, the audience would not sit through it. It will fill the theatre a few more times and then gather dust in the archives.”

    Bertini itemized his expenses for tickets, train fare, and meals, and asked Verdi for reimbursement. Verdi was so amused that he instructed Ricordi to pay Bertani – but not the full amount, since, as Verdi put it: “…to pay for his dinner too? No! He could very well have eaten at home!” Verdi asked for a signed statement that (quote) “Bertani promises never again to go to hear my new operas, to avoid for himself the danger of other specters and for me the farce of paying him for another trip.”


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    Senior Member Rogerx's Avatar
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    Giuseppe Fortunino Francesco Verdi (Le Roncole, 10 oktober 1813 – Milaan, 27 januari 1901)

    The great composer would have been 206 today.
    Last edited by Rogerx; Oct-09-2019 at 05:38.
    “Never argue with an idiot. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.” ― Mark Twain

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    Senior Member KenOC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rogerx View Post



    Giuseppe Fortunino Francesco Verdi (Le Roncole, 10 oktober 1813 – Milaan, 27 januari 1901)

    The great composer would have been 106 today.
    Something terribly wrong with the math here!


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    Senior Member Rogerx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KenOC View Post
    Something terribly wrong with the math here!
    Glad someone is awake.
    “Never argue with an idiot. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.” ― Mark Twain

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    Senior Member flamencosketches's Avatar
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    It's also only the 9th, in our hemisphere. In any case, happy early birthday, Verdi. Maybe I will finally listen to something of his music today. I have been meaning to give him a fair shot for a long while.

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    Senior Member DavidA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KenOC View Post
    An amusing Verdi story I got in the e-mail today.
    ----------------------------------
    Is the customer always right? Apparently Giuseppe Verdi thought so – to a degree, at least. On today’s date in 1872, Verdi sent a note to his publisher, Giulio Ricordi, with an attached letter he had received from a disgruntled customer, a certain Prospero Bertani, who had attended not one, but two performances of Verdi’s then brand new opera, “Aida.”

    “I admired the scenery,” wrote Bertani, “I listened with pleasure to the excellent singers, and took pains to let nothing escape me. After it was over, I asked myself whether I was satisfied. The answer was ‘no’.” Since everyone else seemed to think “Aida” was terrific, Bertani attended a second performance to make sure he wasn’t mistaken, and concluded: “The opera contains absolutely nothing thrilling or electrifying. If it were not for the magnificent scenery, the audience would not sit through it. It will fill the theatre a few more times and then gather dust in the archives.”

    Bertini itemized his expenses for tickets, train fare, and meals, and asked Verdi for reimbursement. Verdi was so amused that he instructed Ricordi to pay Bertani – but not the full amount, since, as Verdi put it: “…to pay for his dinner too? No! He could very well have eaten at home!” Verdi asked for a signed statement that (quote) “Bertani promises never again to go to hear my new operas, to avoid for himself the danger of other specters and for me the farce of paying him for another trip.”
    Amazing how wrong these untalented people can be!

  10. #53
    Senior Member DavidA's Avatar
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    My introduction to opera as a lad was Verdi's Rigoletto conducted by Solti. It cost me a small fortune in those days £4 because I only earned about £1.5 a week serving behind the record counter. I must confess I bought it because it was on only two LPs and was all I could afford and I played it and played it. Had a lovely booklet too and I fell in love with Anna Moffo! Heartbroken when she died at end! Still have the recording and love it in spite of Solti's somewhat brusque treatment of the score. To me Verdi speaks to the heart like no other opera composer apart from Mozart.



    Just say with Toscanini: Viva Verdi!

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