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Thread: Il Trovatore

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    Senior Member guythegreg's Avatar
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    Default Il Trovatore

    I notice that Il Trovatore is number 48 on the all-time list (TC), ahead of other masterpieces like Simon Boccanegra, Manon (Massenet), Faust, l'Elisir d'Amore and various and disputable worthies. I figure someone here must love Trovatore. I've seen it quite a few times and haven't yet been able to figure out why. What does it do for you? Where are the great moments?

    PS nice avatar, no?

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    Senior Member sospiro's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by guythegreg View Post
    I notice that Il Trovatore is number 48 on the all-time list (TC), ahead of other masterpieces like Simon Boccanegra, Manon (Massenet), Faust, l'Elisir d'Amore and various and disputable worthies. I figure someone here must love Trovatore.
    One that a lot of people knew.

    Quote Originally Posted by guythegreg View Post
    I've seen it quite a few times and haven't yet been able to figure out why. What does it do for you? Where are the great moments?
    The music, definitely not the story

    The incomparable Ettore Bastianini as Il Conte di Luna Il balen del suo sorriso





    Quote Originally Posted by guythegreg View Post
    PS nice avatar, no?
    Ann

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    Senior Member guythegreg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sospiro View Post
    One that a lot of people knew.
    You think they just voted for it because it was familiar?

    (yep, gotta got my headphones working!)

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    Il Trovatore gets a lot of heat for its poor story line and somewhat unadventurous score, but it truly is masterfully dramatic in the way it explores the predicaments of of the Count, Manrico, the Troubadour, Leonora, and Azucena through one another.

    Check out the Trovatore chapter of William Berger's Verdi with a Vengeance. It's a really interesting take on the opera.

    As for favorite moments: the Anvil Chorus and "Condotti ell'era in ceppi" both from Act II, Manrico's "Ah! si, ben mio" and his "Di quella pira" from Act III, and the final scene in Act IV

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    Senior Member guythegreg's Avatar
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    Yay! Someone likes it! Thanks for the book recommendation too, I'll look for that.

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    Senior Member Hesoos's Avatar
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    I like a lot Il trovatore!!! And I think the story is perfect!!
    The story is so dark, the gypsis's revenge on the boy that was like a son for her. Is a horror opera like Macbeth. The music is fantastic, but the music it's so dark... "Stride la vampa" the horror aria from Azucena, "Di quella pira", the "Miserere" in the final act.
    1813 - 2013 Verdi and Wagner 200 years

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    Senior Member guythegreg's Avatar
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    Hesoos! do you have a bunch of different copies? Who does the best Azucena? From the plot, it seems like Azucena is really the key ingredient ... ?

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    Senior Member MAuer's Avatar
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    I didn't vote in that original compilation of "top 100" operas, but Il Trovatore is one of my favorites, as well. Yes, the plot is goofy, but the music is gorgeous. I think the Conte di Luna's aria, "Il balen del suo sorriso," is one of the most beautiful in the baritone repertoire. Especially when sung by Sherrill Milnes . . .


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    Senior Member guythegreg's Avatar
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    Really! Well, I'm off to the library tomorrow, and if Stockhausen's "Gruppen" doesn't work for me, Milnes and Trovatore are my second choice. Wish me luck!

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    Senior Member Hesoos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by guythegreg View Post
    Hesoos! do you have a bunch of different copies? Who does the best Azucena? From the plot, it seems like Azucena is really the key ingredient ... ?
    Yes, Azucena is the key ingredient. She is a good and tender mother but at the same time the revenge and the honor are for her the strongest emotions. All the story is about the revenge and the two Azucena’s personalities. She is perhaps a witch like her mother. All the story happens in the dark, it's always night. The history’s backgrounsd is a civil war in the Confederated Kingdom of Aragonia where the Catalan count Urgell wants to be the king and wants to avoid installing a Spanish king (I’m Catalan and I’m sorry that Urgell lost the war). In this civil war the brothers fight each other.

    I have 2 cd’s and 1 dvd.
    Domingo (Manrico), Plowright (Leonora), Zancannaro (Luna), and Fassbaender (Azucena)
    Pavarotti (Manrico), Sutherland(Leonora), Wixell (Luna), and Horne (Azucena)



    My dvd is the metropolitan old version, Pavarotti, Marton, Milnes and Zajick.




    Perhaps the best Azucena for me is Zajick, she is more sinister and fits better with the character, but Horne has a more beautiful voice anyway.
    I like the best the duo Pavarotti- Sutherland. Pavarotti has a sweet voice and he can do that his voice sounds so sad, and Manrico is a sad character.

    My best scene is the Misere. That’s so macabre, The priests sing the Miserere to Manrico, a song of death, and Manrico sings a love song.
    From youtube I’ve found Caruso singing this scene.





    That story is for me really wonderful and I tried to draw a comic about it, but I just became tired and it's unfinished. Here's one page of my unfinished comic. In this page the capitan Ferrando tells the story of Azucena's mother. If you click on the image you can see it bigger
    trovatore.jpg
    Last edited by Hesoos; Jun-29-2012 at 21:14.
    1813 - 2013 Verdi and Wagner 200 years

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    Senior Member Hesoos's Avatar
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    And here the Liszt's transcription for piano from the Trovatore's miserere

    1813 - 2013 Verdi and Wagner 200 years

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    Senior Member guythegreg's Avatar
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    That's INTERESTING! Zajick is doing Ulrica at the Met in the fall, in Ballo in Maschera, and if she was a good Azucena, she ought to be a pretty good Ulrica, I'm thinking.

    And I shouldn't say this but there actually are two Wagner pieces I love, one either the Meistersinger overture or the Tannhauser overture (well, hell, they're interchangeable), by that Cuban pianist who was also a diplomat - Jorge something? aah, my mind is going ... but I'm not a complete Wagnerphobe, I just play one on TV ...

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    Senior Member AndyS's Avatar
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    I've been getting familiar with this recently through the Callas recording

    Favourite bit for me is absolutely the trio at the end of Act 2

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    Senior Member Hesoos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by guythegreg View Post
    That's INTERESTING! Zajick is doing Ulrica at the Met in the fall, in Ballo in Maschera, and if she was a good Azucena, she ought to be a pretty good Ulrica, I'm thinking.
    ...
    Sure she is a good Ulrica. And a good Lady Macbeth, or Ortrud in Lohengrin. Her voice can sounds sinister. The Ulrica's aria Re dell'abisso, affrettati "King of the abyss make haste" is similar with the Stride la vampa from Il trovatore.
    1813 - 2013 Verdi and Wagner 200 years

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    Senior Member MAuer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hesoos View Post
    Yes, Azucena is the key ingredient. She is a good and tender mother but at the same time the revenge and the honor are for her the strongest emotions. All the story is about the revenge and the two Azucena’s personalities. She is perhaps a witch like her mother. All the story happens in the dark, it's always night. The history’s backgrounsd is a civil war in the Confederated Kingdom of Aragonia where the Catalan count Urgell wants to be the king and wants to avoid installing a Spanish king (I’m Catalan and I’m sorry that Urgell lost the war). In this civil war the brothers fight each other.
    Very interesting background information. Thanks for sharing.

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