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Thread: Jacques Loussier & his trio, do anyone loves it?

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    Default Jacques Loussier & his trio, do anyone loves it?

    Bonjour tout le monde!! Le française trio de jazz par Jacques Loussier et son ami, c'est le trio convertit la misuque classique à jazz. Vous aimez il, oui ou non??

    The french jazz band, Jacques Loussier and its trio, does anyone love it?
    I love it very much, French romantic temptation, I love French culture. Ha Ha... Especially his conversion for Bach's music, Italian concerto, Partita, orch. suite, cantata, different sonatas etc... very very good, a totaly different view to look at Bach's music again. Another kinds of structure and dynamics. Very romantic and relax.

    But I would like to know, other than Jacques Loussier and his trio, are there any other jazz bands also love to convert classical music to jazz style? if you know, please tell me, because I'm not an expert and familiar with jazz bands, I just love its style and feeling. And I would like to know more about it.
    Other than this kind of conversion jazz bands like Jacques Loussier's one,any other pure jazz band you thnk that is good, please tell me also, I really want to learn to listen.

    Thank you!! Merci Beaucoup!!

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    Senior Member Ciel_Rouge's Avatar
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    The first time I listened to it was when a friend of mine was demonstrating the capabilities of a pair of speakers to a foreign customer. The piece that he was playing, I guess it was Loussier's conversion of Vivaldi, started definitely "jazzy" to me, but then suddenly unfolded into full-blown Vivaldi with jazz flavour and it absolutely blew me away. I never liked the idea of converting classical into jazz or rock, however the way Loussier does it is not as artificial as other attempts. Instead, he just brings out the jazz elements that are actually ALREADY THERE.

    The thing with jazz is that it always made me fall asleep. But when combined with classical, it suddenly got a new kind of energy from it, that always seemed to be missing. Anyway, after that experience, I suddenly started growing interest in "normal" jazz as well. Try listening to Kimiko Itoh, she is a Japanese jazz player. You can listen to her wonderful piece "Follow me" used for a trailer for an anime film "Ghost in the Shell2: Innocence". The music does not start immediately but they will stop talking and the piece will blossom - and when it does, I guess you will know what I mean by saying "wonderful":

    Kimiko Itoh - Follow me

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    It is very refreshing to see some stirring of jazz interest, Jacques Loussier
    has been mentioned before and IMO is a good musician who does things with J.S.B that the master would enjoy. Although it must be said it is not pure jazz in that most of it is learned at rehearsal and just repeated, whereas jazz should be improvised, but I am being picky and I know what you mean.

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    About six or seven years age, I had the good fortune to stand at the side of M Loussier for about 45 minutes whilst he warmed up for a performance later that evening.
    The location was a small cinema/theatre in Beverley, East Yorkshire where the Loussier trio was performing for one evening. The reason for my proximity was the 1927 Bluthner 5'6" grand he was playing was on hire from a friend of mine who is in the piano business and I was helping out with the movement of the piano.
    Cards on the table, I am no lover of jazz as such; I will gladly acknowledge the mastery of Oscar Peterson and others, but I do not like the end result. As has been mentioned above, it is a moot point as to whether ot not Loussier's playing is "jazz", I leave that question to the purists. I will say however, that whatever you want to call it, from that evening on, I became a total fan of M Loussier. I have yet to come across such a clean, crisp style but with no hint of coldness, and the sort of articulation that surely Bach himself would have admired. I even enjoyed his re-working of Vivaldi, a composer who, in my opinion gets a far better press than he deserves anyway.
    M Loussier was kind enough to pass very favourable comment on the Bluthner, an instrument I play regularly myself and which I had regulated prior to the performance.
    Modest claim to fame, but there it is!!

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    My piano teacher gave me a CD of Loussier doing Bach, and I was completely awe struck. It was so crisp and fresh, I just fell in love with it.

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    Senior Member marval's Avatar
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    I am not a great fan of Jazz, but Jacques Loussier is someone different. I like his interpretations of music.

    He takes classical music and gives it his own slant, without ruining it.


    Margaret

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    Senior Member oisfetz's Avatar
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    Bach sounds fantastic at any tempi and/or rythm/ and/or instrument. Vibraphone,
    sax,string quartet,viola,whatever you choose; their greatness not depends of
    the media,but is inherent to the music. A bad or boring Bach only depends on
    a bad or boring player.

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    Senior Member SONNET CLV's Avatar
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    I first heard of the esteemed Jacques Loussier when I attended one of his concerts at a U.S. college campus in the early 1970's. He played his Bach pieces, and it blew me away. I have since then acquired quite a few of his albums and they spin on my turntable and in my CD player quite regularly. Except for the fact that several of them are mixed with what seems like too much bass, the music is always superb. Baroque and classical masterpieces rearranged and performed with a unique genius. If some one of you has yet to sample Loussier's classic Play Bach, don't wait too long. You shouldn't deprive yourself of such a grand pleasure.

    loussierbachg.jpg

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