Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 22 of 22

Thread: Michael Haydn Requiem

  1. #16
    Banned
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Straya mate
    Posts
    9,268
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by stomanek View Post
    On youtube a lot of people are saying it is as good as k626 - then again - on youtube loads of people say that salieri is better than M
    Salieri is better than M


  2. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    448
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    The two following threads may be of interest.

    Top 5 Requiems?

    Requiem Masses

    I think you will find reference to Michael Haydn's Requiem if you plod through, including favourite recordings of this and other Masses.

    Just another example of previous threads covering all the same ground.

  3. #18
    Senior Member PlaySalieri's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    3,628
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ComposerOfAvantGarde View Post
    Salieri is better than M

    That's probably my favourite part from Amadeus -

  4. Likes ComposerOfAvantGarde liked this post
  5. #19
    Senior Member PlaySalieri's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    3,628
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I just listened to this:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PjhUVXhNhV8

    So the introitus and kyrie.
    It is beautiful music and I am glad to be aquainted with it. I can certainly hear the influence of this work on Mozart.
    However - it is not, for me - on the same level on artistic invention. I would say it is closer to the level of Pergolesi Stabat Mater - which I do like a lot and it is no insult for me to say that. Mozart is known for taking pebbles and coverting them into diamonds and that is the case with Haydn's fine mass.

  6. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    220
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    There is a moment toward the end of the Sequenz that stood out to me even before I was very familiar with the piece, and I now recognize it as one of the most haunting and beautiful moments in the whole work.

    It is the words "Judicandus homo reus" in the Lacrimosa. The music he sets those words to....... my god.

  7. Likes ComposerOfAvantGarde liked this post
  8. #21
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    220
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I'm still obsessed with this piece. I've now listened to the entire thing about 37 times since I purchased it in July.

  9. Likes ComposerOfAvantGarde liked this post
  10. #22
    Senior Member hammeredklavier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    4,943
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by macgeek2005 View Post
    Honestly, if historians suddenly discovered that Mozart actually lived to 1793, and that he wrote another Requiem in 1792, and this was it, I would have believed it.
    This work was written in 1771. I think belongs more in the 1770s in style; the Gregorian melody of the opening movement ("Te decet") quotes J.A. Hasse's Requiem in C, which was written 8 years earlier. The arias also have a certain "Hassean" post-Baroque quality about them. An exceptional work for its time, but Mozart's by comparison sounds more "contemporary" to the late Classical period, like Die Zauberflote, for example.

    I always think that Michael's influence on Mozart (his younger colleague and friend), Weber (his pupil), Schubert (his admirer) is more important and significant than his brother Joseph's (whose influence on Mozart did not go beyond some rhythmically rustic expressions in string ensemble music.) in terms of dramatic/expressive chromaticism.
    4:28 (written in 1773) , 3:00 , 1:37 , 1:24 , 1:17 (written in 1772) , 5:49 (written in 1768)
    {Never found Joseph's use of chromaticism really "striking" tbh btw; seems to be just "playing around notes for notes' sake" on the "surface" level: 23:55 , 12:20. It might be why his music can sometimes be seen as "narrow" in terms of emotional scope. I'm even inclined to think his Op.20 should classify as "divertimentos", but this is a topic for another thread.}

    The way to set the text "Lacrimosa dies illa" for psychological effect in the final minutes of the Dies irae (11:40~13:40); I believe this even goes beyond his contemporary Gluck's achievements in operatic music. Also look at sections like: 12:41 , 14:01 , 16:55, etc.

    "In just two weeks Michael Haydn composed his work in December 1771, on the occasion of the death of his employer, Prince Bishop Sigismund Count Schrattenbach, who was beloved among the people and was a great patron of the arts. The work was written under the impression of personal tragedy: Haydn’s only child, Aloisia Josepha, died in January 1771, before completing her first year of life."

    The Michael Haydn requiem also influenced works of Mozart Mozart himself actually considered important such as K.339/iv (from the vespers, which Mozart himself held in high regard) and K.426 (which Mozart later transcribed for strings and added an introductory adagio, and would profoundly affect Beethoven). For instance, K.339/iv (with its subject) is unmistakably reminiscent of the Cum sanctis tuis from the Michael Haydn requiem. Both K.339/iv and K.426 deal with this motivic expression, found in the Michael Haydn:

    K.426, I believe, just takes the chromatic expressivity to the maximum. (There are other works such as K.194, K.243, K.257, etc where Mozart takes ideas from the Michael Haydn requiem, but I'll just focus on K.339, K.426 in this post)

    Btw, this is how I see the formal layout:
    Requiem in C Minor, MH 155 (1771)
    "trumpet signal" & requiem 1st theme: [ 0:20 ]
    requiem 2nd theme: [ 3:20 ~ 3:45 ]
    lacrimosa theme: [ 11:40 ~ 11:48 ]
    chromatic fourth theme (climbing from D to G in the bassline): [ 12:40 ~ 12:50 ]
    hosanna theme (lacrimosa theme transformed/recapitulated): [ 24:21 ~ 24:29 ]
    "trumpet signal": [ 26:48 , 27:56 ]
    chromatic fourth theme recapitulated (climbing from G to C in the soprano solo): [ 28:40 ~ 28:50 ]
    cum sanctis tuis fugue: [ 29:17 ~ 31:16 ]
    requiem 2nd theme recapitulated: [ 31:22 ~ 31:50 ]
    requiem 1st theme recapitulated: [ 31:58 ~ 32:30 ]
    cum sanctis tuis fugue recapitulated: [ 32:38 ~ 34:30 ]
    Last edited by hammeredklavier; Jun-08-2021 at 01:49.

  11. Likes Josquin13 liked this post
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Similar Threads

  1. Michael Haydn
    By clavichorder in forum Composer Guestbooks
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: Oct-05-2021, 06:58
  2. Michael Harrison
    By Polednice in forum Composer Guestbooks
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: Jun-15-2016, 05:56
  3. Johann Michael Haydn...Related to ?
    By hawk in forum Classical Music Discussion
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: Jan-02-2012, 16:19
  4. Michael Gandolfi
    By Mirror Image in forum Composer Guestbooks
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Sep-09-2009, 07:30

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •