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Thread: Most known&meaningful melodies ever

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    Senior Member jani's Avatar
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    Default Most known&meaningful melodies ever

    So what are the most known&meaningful melodies you know, melodies that have shaped our culture and "changed the world"

    Beethovens Ode to joy definitely fits to that category.


    A quote form wikipedia
    "During the division of Germany in the Cold War, the Ode to Joy segment of the symphony was also played in lieu of an anthem at the Olympic Games for the Unified Team of Germany between 1956 and 1968. In 1972, the musical backing (without the words) was adopted as the Anthem of Europe by the Council of Europe and subsequently by the European Communities (now the European Union) in 1985.[34] In 1985, the European Union chose Beethoven's music as the EU anthem.[35] When Kosovo declared independence in 2008, it lacked an anthem, so for the independence ceremonies it used Ode to Joy, in recognition of the European Union's role in its independence. It has since adopted its own anthem. Additionally, the Ode to Joy was used as the national anthem of Rhodesia between 1974 and 1979, as "Rise, O Voices of Rhodesia"."

    I still can't comprehend how he was able to create one of the most beautiful after what he had been trough in his life.
    Last edited by jani; Jul-25-2012 at 16:12.
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    Two of the top of my head:

    Wagner, Ride of the Valkyries. It's just notorious. Rich with all kinds of subtexts.
    Barber, Adagio for Strings. Played at JFK's funeral and after nine-eleven.

    Both war movies soundtracks, I just noticed.

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    Senior Member LordBlackudder's Avatar
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    most known are Greensleeves, Amiercan national anthem.

    o fortuna changed how movie trailers and pop idol shows are presented.

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    Senior Member BurningDesire's Avatar
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    that little tune from Taurega's Grand Waltz X3

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    Senior Member beetzart's Avatar
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    Chopin piano sonata no.2 3rd movement first few bars.

    I've heard it chanted at many a football match when someone gets injured.

    Haydn 'Emperor' string Quartet 2nd movement?

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    Most known and meaningful? Wow, that narrows down the choices.

    The motto for Beethoven's 5th probably fits as far as meaningful, especially since it matches the Morse code symbol for V, and the BBC used it during World War II, played on a tympani. As far as recognizable, there's no question. It even was recorded in a disco version in the '70s.

    Maybe not on that level, but Mahler's Adagietto should have a place, especially after Ekaterina Gordeeva used it as tribute to her late husband as she skated alone.

    In America, the theme from Dvorak's New World Symphony fits, since it has become a spiritual, Going Home. I can't find the picture, but there is a moving photograph of a black man in tears watching JFK's funeral procession and, on his accordion, playing Going Home.

    Two other themes of significance to Americans is Copland's Fanfare for the Common Man and the Shaker tune from Appalachian Spring. Also, the theme to Rhapsody in Blue has come to symbolize the emergence of American music into the 20th Century world - as one BBC commentator put it, the sliding clarinet has the effect of a woman in a red dress walking into a bar.
    Last edited by Manxfeeder; Jul-25-2012 at 23:34.

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    Inactive Carpenoctem's Avatar
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    Beethoven Symphony No. 5, first movement, also his 9th.

    Mozart - Symphony No.40 - first movement

    Wagner - Ride of the Valkyries

    Brahms - Hungarian Dance No.5

    Bach - Toccata and Fugue in D minor

    Mozart - Eine Kleine Nachtmusik - Allegro

    This were the first ones I could think of, I'm sure there are many more.

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    Senior Member beetzart's Avatar
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    Elgar-Nimrod
    I love Muzio Clementi's music.

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    Senior Member crmoorhead's Avatar
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    I'm constantly hearing opera tunes on TV. Such things as:

    Nessun dorma from Turandot
    Casta diva from Norma
    La donna e mobile from Rigoletto
    Brindisi from Traviata
    O mio babbino caro from Gianni Schicchi
    Ride of the Valkeries from Die Walkure
    Queen of the Night aria from Die Zauberflote
    Largo al factotum from The Barber of Seville
    Anvil chorus from Il Trovatore

    Overtures from:

    Barber of Seville
    William Tell
    The Marriage of Figaro

    Intermezzo from Cavalleria Rusticana.

    I'm sure I've missed lots, but all of these are well-known tunes to the general public and are usually used to sell something to them. In the last while I have seen Casta Diva advertising perfume, The Overture to Figaro advertising supermarkets, the Queen of the night being used to advertise Durex and La Donna e mobile being used, rather implausibly, to advertise pizza. Meanful, probably not, but I do think they have fully infiltrated popular culture.

    Last edited by crmoorhead; Jul-26-2012 at 02:18.

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    Senior Member EricABQ's Avatar
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    Fur Elise.

    It seems like everyone i ever knew who took piano lessons played that melody.

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    Senior Member Ramako's Avatar
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    Sorry to be boring, but in classical music I think it is the opening motif of the first movement of Beethoven's fifth. Of course its arguably the best known motif in all of music ever written, so its obviously known. I always enjoyed that movement, but not especially so. But then recently I suddenly connected with it, and heard and felt all the tragedy, the heroism, especially when the motif comes back in the recap and coda. It is like Beethoven, or his music, shaking his fist at fate, and going on anyway. He really understood how to make best use of that motif.
    Last edited by Ramako; Jul-26-2012 at 08:34.

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    Wagner's overture to Tannhauser. It was used in a Bugs Bunny episode (I also remember Barber of Seville). There was a bunch of other melodies, but I don't remember them. (Does anyone have a link to a list?)

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    Senior Member peeyaj's Avatar
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    No one mentioned it yet?

    [yt]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mCbtQTL4P0M[/yt]

    Arthur Rubinstein wish is to play this piece on his funeral. The melody is bare, almost skeletal, but it is heavenly, transcendent and heart-breakingly beautiful.

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    Quote Originally Posted by peeyaj View Post
    No one mentioned it yet?
    We were waiting for you.

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    Senior Member Art Rock's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Manxfeeder View Post
    In America, the theme from Dvorak's New World Symphony fits, since it has become a spiritual, Going Home. I can't find the picture, but there is a moving photograph of a black man in tears watching JFK's funeral procession and, on his accordion, playing Going Home.
    Found it for you (it was Roosevelt's funeral actually).

    Attachment 6482

    Link.
    Last edited by Art Rock; Jul-26-2012 at 15:49.
    #I♥CD

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