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Thread: Digital piano and PC?

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    Default Digital piano and PC?

    Hi,

    I'm planning to buy a digital piano. My main concern is fidelity, and I'm not convinced by the few layers of some digital pianos. The question is: through a PC, can I make my keyboard (provided it has MIDI/USB ports of course) sound more like a real one? Can I add a lot of layers through some utilities that process MIDI or the like?

    Hope you get the idea, but if not, I'll try to make it more clear. Thanks in advance!

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    Senior Member Ravndal's Avatar
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    i don't know how this works http://www.synthogy.com/products/uprightpianos.html

    but yeah
    "That as s."

    - Mark Twain

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    Just to make it clear: as you already know, depending on the speed you hit a key, a real piano produces a particular timbre. Some digital pianos try to replicate this behaviour using different "layers". For instance, some digital pianos use only a sample and change its volume depending on the speed, and it's quite okay, but... My question deals with this point: software able to cleverly convert MIDI input to audio, replicating as much as possible what happens when strings get hit in a piano.

    Ravndal, thanks for the link. I'll read it thoroughly.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Luca View Post
    Hi, I'm planning to buy a digital piano. My main concern is fidelity, and I'm not convinced by the few layers of some digital pianos. The question is: through a PC, can I make my keyboard (provided it has MIDI/USB ports of course) sound more like a real one? Can I add a lot of layers through some utilities that process MIDI or the like?
    My suggestion is: first, get a physical keyboard you like, as your MIDI controller; then start exploring the numerous "plug-ins" that are available.

    When I made my "big decision," I chose the Yamaha P-90. It's got 88 weighted keys, feels good to play, and is (relativley) compact & easy to transport.

    When I play its "harpsichord" setting, I often layer other harpsichord sounds with it, as well as shorter-attack sounds. You'd be surprised; just experiment.

    They make a "John Cage prepared piano" plug-in I'd like to get next.
    Last edited by millionrainbows; Aug-25-2012 at 01:13.

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    Thanks for the reply.

    I'm trying to understand if it's worth getting a multi layered piano, or a single layer piano that I can mess around with software to add more layers. If the latter is not possible, I would head to a multi layered one.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Luca View Post
    Just to make it clear: as you already know, depending on the speed you hit a key, a real piano produces a particular timbre. Some digital pianos try to replicate this behaviour using different "layers". For instance, some digital pianos use only a sample and change its volume depending on the speed, and it's quite okay, but... My question deals with this point: software able to cleverly convert MIDI input to audio, replicating as much as possible what happens when strings get hit in a piano.

    Ravndal, thanks for the link. I'll read it thoroughly.
    Yes, you can play into a sequencer program with whatever software instruments you want or by a packaged program that does the same. You can buy very meticulously sampled pianos, http://www.synthogy.com/products/ivorygrand.html has a Steinway and Bosendorfer with 18 velocity layers per key and simulates soundboard resonance
    Doch dieses Wörtlein: und, -wär' es zerstört,
    wie anders als mit Isoldes eignem Leben wär' Tristan der Tod gegeben?

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    Senior Member Ravndal's Avatar
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    If you're intro music production, i have heard that this VST is very nice http://www.native-instruments.com/#/...akt/the-giant/

    Havent tested it yet though.
    Last edited by Ravndal; Aug-26-2012 at 17:42.
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    I'm not sure what you mean by "layered" unless you mean playing several patches at once through a mixer.



    Last edited by millionrainbows; Sep-08-2012 at 22:51.

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    Quote Originally Posted by millionrainbows View Post
    I'm not sure what you mean by "layered" unless you mean playing several patches at once through a mixer.
    This video (the second part of it) shows a piano using different layers, check it out (don't mind the piano itself, it's just a video I've found)
    www.youtube.com/watch?v=UrM7TzRVWhI

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    Hi,

    on www.scorio.com you can find a music editor which works like a digital piano. You can easily compose music pieces with it.
    To save and print your pieces you have to register for free.
    scorio could also be interesting for ipad users because there are two music case apps available.

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