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Thread: Your favorite mass

  1. #76
    Senior Member lupinix's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chordalrock View Post
    I've been listening through masses by the Renaissance masters, and so far Dufay's "Missa L'homme Arme" stands out as a favorite. I especially love the credo, which is probably one of the best pieces I've heard. Here's a good recording of it:



    Dufay was considered the greatest composer of his time, some say the greatest of the century until Josquin and then Palestrina replaced his position. His use of rhythm is more unusual than the later composers' and he uses little imitation, basically letting the music flow rather than trying to impress with intellectual constructions like the canon. He was famed for his melodic inventiveness. He was also a pioneer in the use of thirds and sixths.

    A word of warning: composers from the 15th century didn't always notate the accidentals that they nevertheless expected to be performed. I think many ensembles get it wrong when it comes to these "musica ficta". You can, for example, compare Oxford Camerata's recording of the credo (link above) with The Hilliard's (also on youtube). The latter sounds completely different in places and not very successful due to their application of too many accidentals.

    I'm mostly not an expert on different recordings, but as far as Dufay goes, in addition to Oxford Camerata, The Binchois Consort and The Huelgas Ensemble are reliable, competent performers. The latter recorded all of Dufay's isorhythmic motets, and the former his "Missa Se la face ay pale". There's also a Josquin recording that, judging from one of the reviews, is probably competent: the one with the two L'homme arme masses by Ensemble Metamorphoses. I think it's out of print currently, although it's a very recent recording.

    Someone said newer recordings tend to be more successful with the musica ficta. I guess current understanding is better than it was a decade or two ago.
    its also my favorite mass, as far as I know now, a really great composer

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  3. #77
    Senior Member Marschallin Blair's Avatar
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    I don't know if I have a favorite mass in extenso, but I sure adore Karajan's Kyrie from Mozart's Great Mass in C Minor for starters.

    aaa mass.jpg

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  5. #78
    Senior Member jdec's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marschallin Blair View Post
    I don't know if I have a favorite mass in extenso, but I sure adore Karajan's Kyrie from Mozart's Great Mass in C Minor for starters.

    aaa mass.jpg


    I love the whole CD.

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  7. #79
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    Let's not forget Haydn's Lord Nelson Mass, Heligmesse and Theresienmesse.
    Facts don't care about your feelings.

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    Senior Member Ingélou's Avatar
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    Wonderful thread with so much beautiful music to explore. I see that I already posted with the Mass of St John Chrysostom. It is celestial; but when I reflect, I think that my most loved Mass setting is probably the Missa de Angelis , the traditional parish Mass setting that was still often sung when I became a Catholic in 1973. I made an effort to learn it, and it still speaks to my heart.

    I was curious about where it came from. On one site, it suggested it went back to the 9th century - but I think not. This sounds more likely, from the Musica Sacra site (Church Music Association of America):

    The Mass of the Angels — Mass VIII — for example, consists of a Kyrie from the 15th or 16th century in mode 5; a Gloria from the 16th century, mode 5; a Sanctus from the 12th century, mode 6; and an Agnus from the 15th century, mode 6. The grouping did not become known as Missa de Angelis until late in its life. It is perhaps best to keep these Masses together as they are in the Liber, for uniformity, and for tradition.

    http://youtu.be/37q9zIznj2M - by Schola Gregoriana
    Last edited by Ingélou; Jun-01-2014 at 09:47.
    ~ Mollie ~
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  10. #81
    Senior Member Richannes Wrahms's Avatar
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    8.19×10^-14 J (various artists)

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  12. #82
    Senior Member Dustin's Avatar
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    At this point I'd go with the popular choice and pick Mozart's Great Mass in C Minor. That haunting melody in the very beginning grabbed me by the throat when I first heard it in the movie Amadeus.

    But I really don't know a lot of Masses yet although I heard some of Haydn's later ones and think they are brilliant.

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  14. #83
    Senior Member (Ret) Alypius's Avatar
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    My favorites come from the Renaissance:

    Antoine Brumel, Missa Et ecce terrae motus (sometimes called the "Earthquake Mass" -- one of the most complex works of polyphony prior to Tallis' dazzling Spem in Alium



    Josquin Desprez: Missa Hercules Dux Ferrariae
    An extraordinary performance by the Italian ensemble De Labyrintho on Stradivarius from 2009:



    Josquin Desprez: Missa Ave Maris Stella
    Again, an amazing performance by a new group: Manfred Cordes / Weser Renaissance Bremen on CPO, 2012:


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  16. #84
    Senior Member PetrB's Avatar
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    Having answered this already, I feel impelled to mention every time I see the heading of this OP while looking through the classical discussion threads, I see it as,
    Your Favorite Mess

    Thanks, now I have that off my chest maybe I can just pass the listing by without that little mental hiccup.

    P.s. Seconding: Josquin Desprez, Missa Ave Maris Stella
    Last edited by PetrB; Jun-03-2014 at 18:23.

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  18. #85
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    Oh yes.

    That's the one that goes

    STELLA!!! STELLA!!!
    Last edited by hpowders; Jun-03-2014 at 18:52.
    Facts don't care about your feelings.

  19. #86
    Senior Member Muse Wanderer's Avatar
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    Johann Sebastian Bach's Mass in B Minor BWV 232

    The Kyrie Eleison is a colossal work that grabs you like no other introductory piece. It is profound, serious and demands your attention from the first few bars. The ritornello and fugue fuse into a virtual cathedral slowly built in our minds. It feel like we are in front of God kneeling down with hands clasped together whilst asking for our redemption and salvation from our earthly suffering. Criste Eleison then acclaims Christ as our saviour.

    In contrast, perhaps representing earthly happiness, the aria in A major - Laudamus Te, feels like the violin and alto dancing and singing their heart out with joy and freedom.

    Et Incarnatus Est soon followed by Crucifixus gives me the shivers with every listen and reminds me of my long gone theist beliefs.

    The Sanctus is another climax during which the voices blend together so gracefully.

    Agnus Dei soon followed by Dona Nobis Pacem are the symbol of Bach's mastery representing Italian melody and German contrapuntal harmony respectively.

    The Angus Dei is a melancholic aria for alto in G minor reminiscent of the melodious Italian ritornellos abundant in Bach's cantatas. At this point we are back to the Kyrie's state of mind, but this time it is more personal and peaceful.

    Dona Nobis Pacem is its answer, a highly harmonious fugue literally elevating you to the higher echelons of heaven up to the supreme being himself.

    A stairway to heaven, or if you wish, the answer to our existential question in this universe that only Bach could construct for us, humanity.
    Last edited by Muse Wanderer; Jun-03-2014 at 23:10.

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  21. #87
    Senior Member science's Avatar
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    I might be lame and say Bach's is my favorite, but up there is Brumel's "earthquake" mass so I get credit for that. In general my favorite masses would be Renaissance - Dufay, Gombert, Ockeghem, Josquin, Palestrina, those guys.
    Liberty for wolves is death to the lambs.

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  23. #88
    Senior Member Xaltotun's Avatar
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    Yesterday I listened to Gounod's Messe Solennelle de Sainte Cécile and was very impressed! I expected ethereal, French blandness and while this mass indeed had no traces of Germanic "OOMPH" that I love, it was a very beautiful, ethereal, French thing, not bland at all. Sort of like a Girodet painting!
    Wäre das Faktum wahr, – wäre der außerordentliche Fall wirklich eingetreten, daß die politische Gesetzgebung der Vernunft übertragen, der Mensch als Selbstzweck respektiert und behandelt, das Gesetz auf den Thron erhoben, und wahre Freiheit zur Grundlage des Staatsgebäudes gemacht worden, so wollte ich auf ewig von den Musen Abschied nehmen, und dem herrlichsten aller Kunstwerke, der Monarchie der Vernunft, alle meine Thätigkeit widmen.

  24. #89
    Junior Member fairbanks's Avatar
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    1. Mozart in C minor
    2. Mozart Requiem
    3. Bach B minor

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  26. #90
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    Haydn Lord Nelson Mass

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