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Thread: The first piece(s) you learned

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    Senior Member Lukecash12's Avatar
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    Default The first piece(s) you learned

    So, what did you learn first? As strange as it sounds, the first pieces that I learned for the piano were Chopin's fantasie impromptu and Mendelssohn's songs without words. The fantasie impromptu doesn't seem like beginner's material at all, but I actually started with the organ before I moved on to the piano. I wasn't very successful at all with Chopin, because of course I hadn't yet been acquainted with the action and tension of a piano's keys. So Mendelssohn seemed more inviting. But it posed it's own challenges. Stuff like his consolation and venetian gondolas was easy enough, but some others like the passion and lost happiness still posed some trouble.

    As for the organ, I started out playing some Franck and Bach. Just simple things I could play in church. Nothing more complex than a chorale by Bach (which is already complex enough). I can see now that this had an impact on which of Bach's cantatas were my favorite later on, because of the nostalgia from chorale melodies.
    Last edited by Lukecash12; Nov-17-2012 at 10:56.
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    Senior Member Ravndal's Avatar
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    The first piece i learned was a piano version of Rossini - Se il mio nome saper voi bramate (The Barber of Seville)

    I played it with my girlfriend at the time, who was an opera singer. so we played it together. was fun
    we also played didos lament, and a song by poulenc i cant remember the name of.
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    Chopin's Prelude in E minor; then some Bach for beginners. I was 20 yrs. old

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    Senior Member Ravndal's Avatar
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    i started when i was 20 as well ^^
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    What beginner Bach pieces are recommended for a newbie?

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    Senior Member jani's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sonata View Post
    What beginner Bach pieces are recommended for a newbie?
    I played this when i played ( I learned half of it).
    I mean the prelude part not the fugue.
    Last edited by jani; Nov-17-2012 at 20:01.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sonata View Post
    What beginner Bach pieces are recommended for a newbie?
    The collected 'beginner's pieces' are in a few various editions -- most are from the "Musical notebook for Anna Magdalena"
    The Schirmer edition "Beginner's Bach" includes a number of those, one movement from a French or English suite (cannot recall which), the Solfeggietto, by Bach fils, Carl Philip Emmanuel, etc.

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    Quote Originally Posted by millionrainbows View Post
    Chopin's Prelude in E minor; then some Bach for beginners. I was 20 yrs. old
    Ah, the prelude in E minor. My Papa would play that fairly often, so I had always wanted to learn it, and it ended up being one of the first Chopin pieces I had success with.
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    Senior Member PetrB's Avatar
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    Age five and a half / six were a long time ago...
    The first piece, then, and the books from which I was learning in that first year.
    (...and, folks, 'first' is by its nature both prime and singular :-)

    Bartok ~ Microkosmos, Book I (of VI); No. 1 - The first piece I learned, which was also the simultaneous 'gateway' into reading, counting and playing. [BTW -- These are brilliant and musical pedagogical pieces. Recommend then to all as 'beginner' 0 mark, or to any struggling with reading, theory. They are that replete.]

    Then in that same year, soon after a number of pieces, in sequence from The Mikroksomos, pieces from...
    Johanne Sebastian Bach ~ Beginner's Bach, Schirmer Edition

    Octavio Pinto ~ "Run Run" from his 'Scenas Infantis'

    Schumann ~ Pieces from 'Album für die Jugend' -- certainly 'the happy farmer,' 'Knicht Ruprecht' as assigned. I was so fascinated with these I read through them all, recalling an especial fascination with 'Fremder Mann.'
    Last edited by PetrB; Nov-17-2012 at 23:01.

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    I think it was the first prelude of Bach's WTC I. Then I moved quickly to other Bach's pieces, like the Italian Concerto (first and second movement), some Inventions, etc. lol, I played a lot of Bach. The first "difficult" piece I played at a decent level was a Polonaise by Chopin, Op. 26, No.1. I remember that I was quite excited with all those pieces, and with piano playing in general. Now I'm in a "flat" moment, I rarely play new pieces, since I rarely play the piano!. . I think that I'm going to, slowly, abandon an active role in music in favor of a passive one, i.e., only music listening.

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    Senior Member Sonata's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by aleazk View Post
    I think that I'm going to, slowly, abandon an active role in music in favor of a passive one, i.e., only music listening.
    We're moving in opposite directions....after years of listening, I'm finally learning to play myself, albeit very slowly. Still, I'm at 90% listening, 10% playing or even more. Once I get a teacher next year that will shift a bit. But teachers and pianos cost money unfortunately!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sonata View Post
    We're moving in opposite directions....after years of listening, I'm finally learning to play myself, albeit very slowly. Still, I'm at 90% listening, 10% playing or even more. Once I get a teacher next year that will shift a bit. But teachers and pianos cost money unfortunately!
    That depends on your area. For example, I bought a Nelson upright built in the 60's for $50, tuned it myself, and it's still a fine instrument. And I found it in a penny saver ad.
    Last edited by Lukecash12; Nov-19-2012 at 09:30.
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    The first complete piece I had memorized that is still there today, was an easy arrangement from the series, "First Fun With Classics." 'Waves of the Danube' by Joseph Ivanici or something like that. There was also an arrangement of the tune in the final sections William Tell overture, but I struggled with it because it was an exercise in repeated notes. The other early piece I still know is my own simple arrangement of the 2nd mvt. of Haydn Symphony 101, "The Clock." There was also an early Ecossaise by Beethoven that may have been the first unaltered piece I ever learned.

    Jump ahead to age 17 from those ages of about 8-10, and the first piece I learned was Bach Invention 13 in A minor. That was more of a technical leap. Before ever having heard it, I picked it from a compilation of baroque music based on sight alone, as I could see there was a consistency to its rhythm and texture while having it still be (more than)sufficiently complex and technically challenging. I attempted Maple Leaf Rag as well, but lost sight of my progress as I was struggling to remember its thicker chords and modulation sections.
    Last edited by clavichorder; Nov-21-2012 at 15:54.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jani View Post
    I played this when i played ( I learned half of it).
    I mean the prelude part not the fugue.
    My first piece too! I played it hundreds of times. I'm sure i could play it perfectly whilst blindfolded, drunk and under attack from furious swans in the back of a speeding transit van.
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    Fur Elise, by ludvig van beethoven.
    This is where I come from: http://ninjakiwi.com/
    Okay, now to the main part.
    Da best song Is. Da most pathetique it could be. If you get the pun, have a cookie.
    www.youtube.com/watch?v=mB4oBRsV3xI
    and the most andante one (more cookies if you get the pun)
    www.youtube.com/watch?v=klZYv-f9kCE
    And the allegro (2 more cookies if you get this pun)
    www.youtube.com/watch?v=k7xl9_gD360

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