Page 3 of 17 FirstFirst 123456713 ... LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 241

Thread: Top 10 Composers For Solo Piano Works

  1. #31
    Senior Member BurningDesire's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    2,537
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I find it bizarre when people list a composer who never wrote for the piano as one of the best piano composers. Keyboard/harpsichord aren't the same thing as piano. It would be like a list for composers who wrote best for the bassoon, and including some renaissance composer for using the krummhorn.

    I don't care if you like Bach's music on piano. He didn't write those pieces for it. A fair amount of the pieces are really for any keyboard, but I think its silly to call that "great piano writing". Its great keyboard writing, but it doesn't acknowledge anything unique to the piano, no use of sustain or dynamics. It is tempered by limitations and capabilities of the harpsichord.
    Last edited by BurningDesire; Nov-26-2012 at 06:50.

  2. #32
    Senior Member KenOC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    SoCal, USA
    Posts
    19,881
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BurningDesire View Post
    I don't care if you like Bach's music on piano. He didn't write those pieces for it.
    Bach's Musical Offering may well have been written for the fortepiano, since that's about all Freddie the Great had. And in fact, Bach acted as a sales agent for Silbermann's fortepianos in later years, once he thought them sufficiently improved. Sales documents survive.


  3. #33
    Senior Member neoshredder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    4,991
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    And the piano does a very poor job of imitating a Harpsichord as well. So it has its limitations as well. Some people just want to hear Bach's music through a Romantic prism. Both are great instruments in their own right but are quite different in sound.

  4. #34
    Senior Member violadude's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    University Place, WA
    Posts
    7,021
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by violadude View Post
    Beethoven
    Chopin
    Schumann
    Liszt
    Brahms
    Prokofiev
    Ravel
    Debussy
    Ravel
    Scriabin

    Also Messiaen
    Why did I put Ravel twice? It won't let me edit it now!

  5. #35
    Senior Member neoshredder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    4,991
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Well Ravel is quite good.

  6. #36
    Senior Member Webernite's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    1,525
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Let's be honest. The list is:

    1. Chopin
    2. Others

    And I don't even like Chopin that much.

  7. #37
    Senior Member Lisztian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    1,166
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Webernite View Post
    Let's be honest. The list is:

    1. Chopin
    2. Others

    And I don't even like Chopin that much.
    Why?

    Filler.

  8. Likes Webernite liked this post
  9. #38
    Senior Member Webernite's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    1,525
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    It's just one of the laws of classical music.

  10. Likes Lisztian liked this post
  11. #39
    Senior Member BurningDesire's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    2,537
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KenOC View Post
    Bach's Musical Offering may well have been written for the fortepiano, since that's about all Freddie the Great had. And in fact, Bach acted as a sales agent for Silbermann's fortepianos in later years, once he thought them sufficiently improved. Sales documents survive.
    I wasn't aware, but still, does the piece take advantage of the capabilities of a fortepiano? And my point stands that in pretty much all his most famous keyboard works he was writing for keyboard in general, and wasn't thinking pianistically.

  12. #40
    Senior Member BurningDesire's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    2,537
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by neoshredder View Post
    And the piano does a very poor job of imitating a Harpsichord as well. So it has its limitations as well. Some people just want to hear Bach's music through a Romantic prism. Both are great instruments in their own right but are quite different in sound.
    I find it plenty Romantic on a harpsichord. I think the instrument suits the drama of his music so much better. On piano it sounds so held-back, and restrained, because when it is played in the manner most musicologists would call accurate, its this extremely limited kind of piano playing. The harder, grimmer sound of the harpsichord fits his music so much better in my opinion, as a romantic :3

  13. #41
    Senior Member tdc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    7,704
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BurningDesire View Post
    I find it bizarre when people list a composer who never wrote for the piano as one of the best piano composers. Keyboard/harpsichord aren't the same thing as piano. It would be like a list for composers who wrote best for the bassoon, and including some renaissance composer for using the krummhorn.

    I don't care if you like Bach's music on piano. He didn't write those pieces for it. A fair amount of the pieces are really for any keyboard, but I think its silly to call that "great piano writing". Its great keyboard writing, but it doesn't acknowledge anything unique to the piano, no use of sustain or dynamics. It is tempered by limitations and capabilities of the harpsichord.
    You do have a point, I just wanted to include Baroque for this list, since I usually leave it out of such lists, but lets face it Bach and Scarlatti sound great on the piano, and as you say yourself a great many of these pieces are really for any keyboard. The piano itself is like an upgraded advanced version of the harpsichord in many ways and very closely related. We have an entire list of 'Keyboard Concertos' for this reason - the two instruments are similar enough that they are often grouped together. Its not like people have to change these works significantly to make them sound great on a modern piano. Do you really think that had the piano been invented in the Baroque era, these master composers would have struggled composing the dynamics for this instrument?

  14. #42
    Senior Member millionrainbows's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    13,908
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    137

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BurningDesire View Post
    I find it bizarre when people list a composer who never wrote for the piano as one of the best piano composers. Keyboard/harpsichord aren't the same thing as piano. It would be like a list for composers who wrote best for the bassoon, and including some renaissance composer for using the krummhorn.

    I don't care if you like Bach's music on piano. He didn't write those pieces for it. A fair amount of the pieces are really for any keyboard, but I think its silly to call that "great piano writing". Its great keyboard writing, but it doesn't acknowledge anything unique to the piano, no use of sustain or dynamics. It is tempered by limitations and capabilities of the harpsichord.
    I would agree with you if it were organ pieces by Bach being proffered, but I see enough correspondences between harpsichord and piano to warrant an exception (bassoon/krummhorn...feh). Plus, the thread idea of "composers" completely excludes artists like Glenn Gould, who worked wonders for Bach on piano.

    If we adhere to the thread idea in a strict manner, then we are assessing "Top 10" piano composers for musical ideas, but also for "pianistic" writing, which includes fingering, appropriate content for execution on keyboard, technical dimensions, etc. On these technical points, I think Bach is very strong, as he himself played piano/organ/keyboards. To exclude him seems unfair; I'm sure he could have been a kick-*** pianist, and his music sits very well for piano. This is keyboard music!

    A blind adherence to history and tradition seems to defeat the purpose. If this thread had been "Top 10 Composers for Solo Keyboard," it might well have included Bach.
    Last edited by millionrainbows; Nov-26-2012 at 15:54.

  15. #43
    Senior Member BurningDesire's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    2,537
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by millionrainbows View Post
    I would agree with you if it were organ pieces by Bach being proffered, but I see enough correspondences between harpsichord and piano to warrant an exception (bassoon/krummhorn...feh). Plus, the thread idea of "composers" completely excludes artists like Glenn Gould, who worked wonders for Bach on piano.

    If we adhere to the thread idea in a strict manner, then we are assessing "Top 10" piano composers for musical ideas, but also for "pianistic" writing, which includes fingering, appropriate content for execution on keyboard, technical dimensions, etc. On these technical points, I think Bach is very strong, as he himself played piano/organ/keyboards. To exclude him seems unfair; I'm sure he could have been a kick-*** pianist, and his music sits very well for piano. This is keyboard music!

    A blind adherence to history and tradition seems to defeat the purpose. If this thread had been "Top 10 Composers for Solo Keyboard," it might well have included Bach.
    Its not blind adherence, its that I don't think Bach really had that instrument in mind. It is a very different instrument from a harpsichord in mechanics and timbre, and in its limitations. I am not questioning Bach's merit as a writer, I love his music, especially that for keyboard, and I am fine with it being performed on other instruments. I just don't think its fair to put him on a list for piano composers and exclude people who actually wrote specifically for that instrument. Bach is awesome, but I stand by that he wasn't really a piano composer in the sense we would call Mozart or Beethoven or Satie or Cage piano composers. If we were talking solo keyboard music I would probably include him on my list.

  16. #44
    Senior Member BurningDesire's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    2,537
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    my list, incidentally, and in no particular order:

    Frederic Chopin
    Claude Debussy
    Charles Ives
    Erik Satie
    Olivier Messiaen
    John Cage
    Ludwig van Beethoven
    Franz Liszt
    Sergei Prokofiev
    Henry Cowell

  17. #45
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    3,054
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Referring to some earlier posts, I would absolutely list Bach here. He didn't write for piano, but only because there was no piano. I think it would be safe to say he wrote for keyboard, so I would definitely list him as a composer who wrote for piano. Here is my list, in order:

    1. Bach - best representation, for me, is the Goldberg Variations, and I like Murray Perahia's recording on piano.
    2. Beethoven - his Waldstein sonata is one of my favorites - go for the Wilhelm Kempff recording
    3. Chopin - he did some other stuff, but stands out the most for piano works - I like the Tristesse Etude
    4. Schubert - try his Wanderer Fantasy
    5. Mozart - his sonatas are great, but I think I prefer his piano concertos
    6. Haydn - very under-recognized in this genre (most people think of his symphonies and string quartets) but try any of the three recordings of his piano sonatas recorded by Marc-Andre Hamelin
    7. Rachmaninoff - his 2nd piano concerto is amazing
    8. Grieg - very lyrical and beautiful piano pieces
    9. Brahms - I know, not what he is typically known for, but I happen to really love some of his solo piano works (as well as his Piano Trio No. 1)
    10. C.P.E. Bach - He is a recent discovery for me, but I love his keyboard solo works and concertos.

Page 3 of 17 FirstFirst 123456713 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Neglected (but Great) Piano Works of Famous Composers
    By teccomin in forum Solo & Chamber Music
    Replies: 80
    Last Post: Jan-25-2015, 14:35
  2. greatest contemporary solo piano works
    By vamos in forum Classical Music Discussion
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: Dec-22-2013, 06:32
  3. Favourite Solo Piano Works
    By Topaz in forum Solo & Chamber Music
    Replies: 29
    Last Post: Apr-23-2013, 21:14
  4. Works for solo wind instrument and solo strings ensamble
    By Aramis in forum Solo & Chamber Music
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: Sep-06-2010, 19:37
  5. Solo Piano works by Composer
    By toejamfootball in forum Classical Music Discussion
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: Aug-24-2007, 13:58

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •