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Thread: What is This Percussion Instrument?

  1. #16
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    An instrument, such as a drum, xylophone, piano, or maraca, in which sound is produced by one object striking another or by being scraped or shaken.

  2. #17
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    A percussion instrument is any object which produces a sound when hit with an implement, shaken, rubbed, scraped, or by any other action which sets the object into vibration. The term usually applies to an object used in a rhythmic context or with musical intent.

    The word "percussion" has evolved from Latin terms: "percussio" (which translates as "to beat, strike" in the musical sense, rather than the violent action), and "percussus" (which is a noun meaning "a beating"). As a noun in contemporary English it is described in Wiktionary as "the collision of two bodies to produce a sound". The usage of the term is not unique to music but has application in medicine and weaponry, as in percussion cap, but all known and common uses of the word, "percussion", appear to share a similar lineage beginning with the original Latin: "percussus". In a musical context then, the term "percussion instruments" may have been coined originally to describe family of instruments including drums, rattles, metal plates, or wooden blocks which musicians would beat or strike (as in a collision) to produce sound.

  3. #18
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    In other words............................................. ..





    not claves.

  4. #19
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    A percussion instrument is any object which produces a sound when hit with an implement, shaken, rubbed, scraped, or by any other action which sets the object into vibration. The term usually applies to an object used in a rhythmic context or with musical intent.

    The word "percussion" has evolved from Latin terms: "percussio" (which translates as "to beat, strike" in the musical sense, rather than the violent action), and "percussus" (which is a noun meaning "a beating"). As a noun in contemporary English it is described in Wiktionary as "the collision of two bodies to produce a sound". The usage of the term is not unique to music but has application in medicine and weaponry, as in percussion cap, but all known and common uses of the word, "percussion", appear to share a similar lineage beginning with the original Latin: "percussus". In a musical context then, the term "percussion instruments" may have been coined originally to describe family of instruments including drums, rattles, metal plates, or wooden blocks which musicians would beat or strike (as in a collision) to produce sound.

  5. #20
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    Me too. And I also hate Chopin.

  6. #21
    Senior Member Rasa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Elliott View Post
    Me too. And I also hate Chopin.
    You appear to be mistaken

  7. #22
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    Thumbs down

    I never said I was right. I am only describing my taste.

  8. #23
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    I should really read post dates before actually posting.
    Last edited by LastExile; Jul-10-2011 at 09:46. Reason: Brain fart.

  9. #24
    Senior Member Il_Penseroso's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by baroque flute View Post
    Something I'm curious about: what is that percussion instrument that sounds sort of like the sound you would make by clicking your tongue (but much better, naturally )? It it some kind of wood block? I've heard it used in classical music.
    Now if you mean something like that wooden sound in Prokofiev's orchetral works, it's simply indicated a Legno (wood) in the score ... listen to Alexander Nevsky Cantata for example ...
    Last edited by Il_Penseroso; Jul-10-2011 at 17:02.
    Tutto nel mondo è burla

  10. #25
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    Yes, usually a woodblock (which can be high or low in pitch). Also the claves may have such a sound as well, used in Latin stuff a lot.

  11. #26
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    Probably


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